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Old February 15th 20, 11:01 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

Hi All

I have a standard wooden internal hinged door. I have recently put a new floor down and when closing the door, the leading edge (i.e. handle edge not the hinge edge) rubs on the floor. Rather than take the door off and plane the bottom etc I thought that if I packed the hinge out a little it would kick that edge up and solve the problem. Only needs about 1mm. So I packed the bottom hinge on the door frame and that seemed to have the opposite effect.

Anyone know which hinge (top or bottom) I should pack and then where the bit that goes on the frame or the bit on the door?

Thanks in advance

Lee.

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Old February 15th 20, 11:43 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 02:01:24 -0800 (PST), Lee Nowell
wrote:

Hi All

I have a standard wooden internal hinged door. I have recently put a new floor down and when closing the door, the leading edge (i.e. handle edge not the hinge edge) rubs on the floor.


Not uncommon.

Rather than take the door off and plane the bottom etc I thought that if I packed the hinge out a little it would kick that edge up and solve the problem.


That 'end' of the bottom of the door you mean, rather than just a
leading / trailing edge as the door sweeps?

Only needs about 1mm. So I packed the bottom hinge on the door frame and that seemed to have the opposite effect.


Strange. Could you have simply allowed the door to drop slightly when
you removed the hinge and re-fitted it?

Anyone know which hinge (top or bottom) I should pack and then where the bit that goes on the frame or the bit on the door?


I'm not sure that any amount of packing that will still allow the door
to sit in the frame squarely will resolve your issue.

Lifting the door 1mm by repositioning the hinges may do it (if you
have room over the door) but a lot of faff?

I think it might be time to get the plane out [1], or fit rising
butt's? ;-)


Cheers, T i m

[1] What about a multitool on some protective material with the door
still hung (if it's only 1mm and 'for now')?
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Old February 15th 20, 11:46 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 02:01:24 -0800 (PST), Lee Nowell wrote:

Anyone know which hinge (top or bottom) I should pack and then where the
bit that goes on the frame or the bit on the door?


Where does the door catch the floor? Near open, half way or near
closed?

If near open pack the bottom hinge against the door.
If near closed pack the bottom hinge against the frame.
If half way pack both sides of the hinge.

Be aware that such packing may make the door swing closed (or open)
on it's own accord. Ideally all the hinge pins need to be plumb
vertical above each other.

--
Cheers
Dave.



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Old February 15th 20, 12:05 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

In article ,
Lee Nowell wrote:
I have a standard wooden internal hinged door. I have recently put a new
floor down and when closing the door, the leading edge (i.e. handle edge
not the hinge edge) rubs on the floor. Rather than take the door off and
plane the bottom etc I thought that if I packed the hinge out a little
it would kick that edge up and solve the problem. Only needs about 1mm.
So I packed the bottom hinge on the door frame and that seemed to have
the opposite effect.


Anyone know which hinge (top or bottom) I should pack and then where the
bit that goes on the frame or the bit on the door?


Change the hinges for rising butt types?

--
*White with a hint of M42*

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Old February 15th 20, 01:01 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

Thanks all. The door was never correctly fitted as the room didn't have any floor covering. Given it was so close to be guessed right the first time thought a little bodge would do the trick.

Did a bit more packing on the bottom hinge and now just slightly scuffs the floor which is good enough. I did try lifting the door slightly but the screw holes essentially made the hinges go back to where it started.

Thanks again another job off the DIY list.


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Old February 15th 20, 04:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

Chris Hogg wrote in
:

On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 04:01:14 -0800 (PST), Lee Nowell
wrote:

Thanks all. The door was never correctly fitted as the room didn't
have any floor covering. Given it was so close to be guessed right
the first time thought a little bodge would do the trick.

Did a bit more packing on the bottom hinge and now just slightly
scuffs the floor which is good enough. I did try lifting the door
slightly but the screw holes essentially made the hinges go back to
where it started.

Thanks again another job off the DIY list.


Pack the screw holes with a matchstick or two on the appropriate side
to shift the screws a smidgen.


MAy have to chisel the rebate a bit if that is constraining the hinge as it
normally would.
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Old February 15th 20, 05:15 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 15:38:47 GMT, John [email protected] wrote:

Chris Hogg wrote in
:

On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 04:01:14 -0800 (PST), Lee Nowell
wrote:

Thanks all. The door was never correctly fitted as the room didn't
have any floor covering. Given it was so close to be guessed right
the first time thought a little bodge would do the trick.

Did a bit more packing on the bottom hinge and now just slightly
scuffs the floor which is good enough. I did try lifting the door
slightly but the screw holes essentially made the hinges go back to
where it started.

Thanks again another job off the DIY list.


Pack the screw holes with a matchstick or two on the appropriate side
to shift the screws a smidgen.


MAy have to chisel the rebate a bit if that is constraining the hinge as it
normally would.


Assuming there is a bit of slack, doing as Chris suggested whilst
lifting the door up (hard) whilst doing the final tightening, might
help a bit (and a bit was all that was needed).

I'm sure we have all biased / eased something in one direction when
final tightening to make it sit better? ;-)

Cheers, T i m
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Old February 16th 20, 09:02 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

If its that close inabout six months you will be doing it all over again as
the damp gets in and the door drops.
I think its plane on bottom of door time, personally.
Brian

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"T i m" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 02:01:24 -0800 (PST), Lee Nowell
wrote:

Hi All

I have a standard wooden internal hinged door. I have recently put a new
floor down and when closing the door, the leading edge (i.e. handle edge
not the hinge edge) rubs on the floor.


Not uncommon.

Rather than take the door off and plane the bottom etc I thought that if I
packed the hinge out a little it would kick that edge up and solve the
problem.


That 'end' of the bottom of the door you mean, rather than just a
leading / trailing edge as the door sweeps?

Only needs about 1mm. So I packed the bottom hinge on the door frame and
that seemed to have the opposite effect.


Strange. Could you have simply allowed the door to drop slightly when
you removed the hinge and re-fitted it?

Anyone know which hinge (top or bottom) I should pack and then where the
bit that goes on the frame or the bit on the door?


I'm not sure that any amount of packing that will still allow the door
to sit in the frame squarely will resolve your issue.

Lifting the door 1mm by repositioning the hinges may do it (if you
have room over the door) but a lot of faff?

I think it might be time to get the plane out [1], or fit rising
butt's? ;-)


Cheers, T i m

[1] What about a multitool on some protective material with the door
still hung (if it's only 1mm and 'for now')?



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Old February 16th 20, 11:10 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Adjusting hinged doors

On 16 Feb 2020 at 08:02:11 GMT, ""Brian Gaff \" Sofa 2\)"
wrote:

If its that close inabout six months you will be doing it all over again as
the damp gets in and the door drops.
I think its plane on bottom of door time, personally.
Brian


With a saw board and (battery) circular saw it can be very quick and accurate
- even just shaving a mm or 2 off. Bitter experience - I've got it down to 10
minutes ;-)


--
Cheers, Rob
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Old February 16th 20, 11:35 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 9,678
Default Adjusting hinged doors

On Sun, 16 Feb 2020 08:02:11 -0000, "Brian Gaff \(Sofa 2\)"
wrote:

If its that close inabout six months you will be doing it all over again as
the damp gets in and the door drops.


Ah, but the flooring might have been compressed slightly by then as
well. ;-)

I think its plane on bottom of door time, personally.


That and rising butt hinges. I don't know why rising butts aren't
standard (they are here) thought as they make this issue of missing
the flooring (till the door is nearly closed and you don't want a gap)
nearly a non issue and means the door closes itself, handy if you have
dogs or kids that leave the door open when you want it closed (even if
not fully closed etc).

They also mean you can just lift the door off if you need to move
furniture in / out (if it give more room / width) or to paint the door
or frame (even if you also take the hinges off to do that, it's easier
to do when the door is on trestles).

Cheers, T i m




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