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Old December 4th 19, 05:32 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy

I found a few rechargeable batteries that had not been used for at
least three years. I charged them all and found they do not seem to
be holding their charge (unable to power a cordless mouse for more
than five minutes).

Is this type of battery destroyed by being left discharged for a long
period or could it recover with a few more charges?

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Old December 4th 19, 05:42 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy

On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:32:01 +0000, Scott wrote:

I found a few rechargeable batteries that had not been used for at least
three years. I charged them all and found they do not seem to be
holding their charge (unable to power a cordless mouse for more than
five minutes).

Is this type of battery destroyed by being left discharged for a long
period or could it recover with a few more charges?


It depends.......

I have an HP PDA not used since about 2005 and the batteries won't hold
charge.

I have a JVC badged digital camera last used in 2005 with several spare
batteries and all seem to hold charge.

So it probably depends on the size of the battery, the chemistry and the
manufacturer.


Cheers



Dave R


--
AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64
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Old December 4th 19, 06:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy

On 04/12/2019 16:42, David wrote:
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:32:01 +0000, Scott wrote:

I found a few rechargeable batteries that had not been used for at least
three years. I charged them all and found they do not seem to be
holding their charge (unable to power a cordless mouse for more than
five minutes).

Is this type of battery destroyed by being left discharged for a long
period or could it recover with a few more charges?


It depends.......

I have an HP PDA not used since about 2005 and the batteries won't hold
charge.

I have a JVC badged digital camera last used in 2005 with several spare
batteries and all seem to hold charge.

So it probably depends on the size of the battery, the chemistry and the
manufacturer.

NiMh and LIPO will in general be destroyed, but Nicad can take it.


Cheers



Dave R




--
There’s a mighty big difference between good, sound reasons and reasons
that sound good.

Burton Hillis (William Vaughn, American columnist)
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Old December 4th 19, 06:26 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy

On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 17:09:58 +0000, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

On 04/12/2019 16:42, David wrote:
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:32:01 +0000, Scott wrote:

I found a few rechargeable batteries that had not been used for at least
three years. I charged them all and found they do not seem to be
holding their charge (unable to power a cordless mouse for more than
five minutes).

Is this type of battery destroyed by being left discharged for a long
period or could it recover with a few more charges?


It depends.......

I have an HP PDA not used since about 2005 and the batteries won't hold
charge.

I have a JVC badged digital camera last used in 2005 with several spare
batteries and all seem to hold charge.

So it probably depends on the size of the battery, the chemistry and the
manufacturer.

NiMh and LIPO will in general be destroyed, but Nicad can take it.


Your avvin a laff, mate.
Even good quality NiCads would grow whiskers if they were left
discharged for any length of time.
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Old December 4th 19, 07:11 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy

In message , Custos Custodum
writes
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 17:09:58 +0000, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

On 04/12/2019 16:42, David wrote:
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:32:01 +0000, Scott wrote:

I found a few rechargeable batteries that had not been used for at least
three years. I charged them all and found they do not seem to be
holding their charge (unable to power a cordless mouse for more than
five minutes).

Is this type of battery destroyed by being left discharged for a long
period or could it recover with a few more charges?

It depends.......

I have an HP PDA not used since about 2005 and the batteries won't hold
charge.

I have a JVC badged digital camera last used in 2005 with several spare
batteries and all seem to hold charge.

So it probably depends on the size of the battery, the chemistry and the
manufacturer.

NiMh and LIPO will in general be destroyed, but Nicad can take it.


Your avvin a laff, mate.
Even good quality NiCads would grow whiskers if they were left
discharged for any length of time.


Hum. Connect a charged NiCad in parallel and vaporise the whiskers:-)

--
Tim Lamb


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Old December 4th 19, 07:17 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy



"Jethro_uk" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:32:01 +0000, Scott wrote:

I found a few rechargeable batteries that had not been used for at least
three years. I charged them all and found they do not seem to be
holding their charge (unable to power a cordless mouse for more than
five minutes).

Is this type of battery destroyed by being left discharged for a long
period or could it recover with a few more charges?


Does it matter

Gave up using rechargeables for AA AAA batteries years ago. There's no
way they saved any money after buying the charger(s) and having the
batteries last for a few months.


My eneloops have lasted much longer than that.

I wouldn't be surprised if they are less environmentally friendly than
regular disposable ones.


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Old December 4th 19, 07:30 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy

In article ,
Jethro_uk wrote:
Gave up using rechargeables for AA AAA batteries years ago. There's no
way they saved any money after buying the charger(s) and having the
batteries last for a few months.


They've save me a fortune on an old rather power hungry mouse.

--
*I didn't drive my husband crazy -- I flew him there -- it was faster

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Old December 4th 19, 09:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default More Heavy Trolling by Senile Nym-Shifting Rodent Speed!

On Thu, 5 Dec 2019 05:17:45 +1100, Ray, better known as cantankerous
trolling senile geezer Rodent Speed, wrote:

Gave up using rechargeables for AA AAA batteries years ago. There's no
way they saved any money after buying the charger(s) and having the
batteries last for a few months.


My eneloops have lasted much longer than that.


BG Auto-contradicting senile asshole!

--
Kerr-Mudd,John addressing senile Rot:
"Auto-contradictor Rod is back! (in the KF)"
MID:
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Old December 4th 19, 09:17 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy

On 04/12/2019 16:32, Scott wrote:
I found a few rechargeable batteries that had not been used for at
least three years. I charged them all and found they do not seem to
be holding their charge (unable to power a cordless mouse for more
than five minutes).


They may never have been able to power a cordless mouse even when new.
Rechargeable batteries have a lower terminal voltage than conventional
single use alkaline cells. At low currents this can matter some devices
shutdown when the cell reaches a certain voltage to help prevent leaks.

My desk phone display will not run at all on rechargables as the LCDs
cannot produce black with the limited voltage. Current requirement is
almost nil but without enough voltage the display just doesn't work.

Is this type of battery destroyed by being left discharged for a long
period or could it recover with a few more charges?


Leaving them flat for a long time or overcharging them will both
seriously shorten battery life. Check them on something with a more
realistic load like a torch and see how long they can power that for.

Some battery technologies handle abuse better than others and in general
the higher the energy density the less happy it is about being abused.
It is worth giving them a charge discharge cycle to see if they wake up.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old December 4th 19, 09:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Rechargeable batteries - life expectancy

On 04/12/2019 17:38, Jethro_uk wrote:
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:32:01 +0000, Scott wrote:

I found a few rechargeable batteries that had not been used for at least
three years. I charged them all and found they do not seem to be
holding their charge (unable to power a cordless mouse for more than
five minutes).

Is this type of battery destroyed by being left discharged for a long
period or could it recover with a few more charges?


Does it matter

Gave up using rechargeables for AA AAA batteries years ago. There's no
way they saved any money after buying the charger(s) and having the
batteries last for a few months.


They should last at least a couple of years (or more) if you look after
them and use them in rotation. Leave some dead flat in a drawer or
continuously on charge and you will more than likely wreck them.

I wouldn't be surprised if they are less environmentally friendly than
regular disposable ones.


NiCads certainly were. NiHM and Lithium less so but I do wonder about
the mining of lithium salts for green electric vehicles being displaced
environmental damage of the out of sight out of mind third world sort.

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/lith...ronment-impact

I have some old WWII surplus NiFe cells that are still going - they are
wet plate, heavy and low capacity by modern standards but they are also
virtually indestructible! Silver zinc from the same source gave up long
since - perhaps no surprise they were not intended for many cycles.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...78775399001640

--
Regards,
Martin Brown


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