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Old February 24th 04, 07:51 PM
Rachel
 
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Default Covering worktop with Fablon

Hi there,

We are renovating our house as we go along, we have put new doors on
the existing carcass of our kitchen, and they look great.

One problem we have is the worktops, really out of date and naf
looking. We can't afford to replace all the worktops yet, as the
cooker fits into the corner of one of them and they we can't get the
depth without ordering it, and it is going to cost quite a lot....

My question is : Has anyone had any experience of covering the
existing worktops using FABLON ?

If so, how was it? Does it still look ok, and is it a good idea.

Obviously we realise that we would have to be careful with the surface
with sharp objects etc .. but nothing can be as bad as it looks at
the moment.

There are some quite nice patterns available these days too :-)

Many thanks in advance for your help.

Regards


Rachel

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Old February 24th 04, 08:00 PM
Lee
 
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Default Covering worktop with Fablon

Rachel wrote:

snip

My question is : Has anyone had any experience of covering the
existing worktops using FABLON ?


The owner of the next door flat did this prior to letting it and yes,
it does look as bad as it sounds.
Fits in well with the state of the rest of his flat though.

It may look ok for a little while though, if you are careful about
applying it and what you put on it...

Lee



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Old February 24th 04, 08:09 PM
dmc
 
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Default Covering worktop with Fablon

In article ,
Rachel wrote:

My question is : Has anyone had any experience of covering the
existing worktops using FABLON ?


As in the sticky back plastic stuff? Can't see that lasting long
at all if I'm thinking of the right stuff.


A friend when presented with a similar problem fitted a thin hardwood
strip along the front of the worktop to square it off and tiled onto
the worktop with cheap white tiles (the type that are 3 quid per acre
in Wickes etc). Looked surprisingly good and lasted several years. I seem
to remember him using some special grout that didn't get so dirty though -
I'm sure others on here could advise.

Tiled worktops can be a bit of a nightmare but if the one you have is
really that bad it maybe worth a try. Certainly I would have thought
it would be better than sticky back plastic (if fablon isn't sticky
back plastic then ignore me :-))!

Darren



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Old February 24th 04, 11:18 PM
Owain
 
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Default Covering worktop with Fablon

"Rachel" wrote
| My question is : Has anyone had any experience of covering
| the existing worktops using FABLON ?

s/FABLON/sticky-back-plastic because I might not have been using the
authentic trademarked stuff.

Yes. And cupboard fronts.

| If so, how was it?

Vile.

| Does it still look ok,

No.

| and is it a good idea.

No.

| Obviously we realise that we would have to be careful with the surface
| with sharp objects etc .. but nothing can be as bad as it looks at
| the moment.

Sticky-back-plastic works okay for things that have *very light* use. I've
had very good results converting a bedside chest of drawers from white to
"pine" and changing the knobs to brass.

However, it seems to shrink after a while leaving sticky edges, it is
difficult to get edges to stick down, and any 3-dimesnional curves go
wrinkly. joints are an absolute no-no.

If your worktops are square edged you might be able to just stick new
laminate on the top and front edge.

Owain


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Old February 25th 04, 08:16 PM
PoP
 
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Default Covering worktop with Fablon

On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 17:50:20 +0000, Andy Hall
wrote:

A good trimming method is a router with trimming cutter - i.e. ball
race on the bottom.


Back in the 60's when the design objectives for B&Q hadn't yet taken
shape in the scrotum of its originator routers weren't exactly the
routine tool a DIYer acquired. A simple electric drill and sander was
about it. I just have this vision of Dad doing the formica by scribing
and snapping - but I'm still not sure if this is right!

PoP

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Old February 25th 04, 09:00 PM
Andy Hall
 
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Default Covering worktop with Fablon

On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 20:16:54 +0000, PoP wrote:

On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 17:50:20 +0000, Andy Hall
wrote:

A good trimming method is a router with trimming cutter - i.e. ball
race on the bottom.


Back in the 60's when the design objectives for B&Q hadn't yet taken
shape in the scrotum of its originator routers weren't exactly the
routine tool a DIYer acquired.


That seminal moment had not taken place.

A simple electric drill and sander was
about it. I just have this vision of Dad doing the formica by scribing
and snapping - but I'm still not sure if this is right!


That was how it was done and it's still effective. The other tool
was something like a Surform to clean up the edges.



PoP



..andy

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