UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #21   Report Post  
Old January 11th 19, 06:31 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
ARW ARW is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2012
Posts: 8,352
Default Resin 'paving'.

On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:


But for the OP I'd say that it would be better to hire a Stihl saw and
cut the paving around the manholes if they cannot be easily repositioned
more 'squarely'. The job will look a lot better.


Would a 9 inch angle grinder do?

--
Adam

  #22   Report Post  
Old January 11th 19, 09:42 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 22,408
Default Resin 'paving'.

On 11/01/2019 15:42, Mark Allread wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:22:08 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:00:06 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

In article ,
Steve Walker writes:
On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:
In article ,
R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.

Note the above - the drive is not being done.


Whether its the drive is not the relevant bit. Any impermeable hard
standing counts, regardless of if its a drive, patio, tennis court etc.


See:

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/inf...n_projects/44/
patio_and_driveway

extract:
"Please note: different rules apply to paving over your front garden.


Fairy snuff, I sit corrected!


--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #23   Report Post  
Old January 11th 19, 09:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2015
Posts: 10,209
Default Resin 'paving'.

On Friday, 11 January 2019 11:42:41 UTC, John Rumm wrote:
On 10/01/2019 21:48, tabbypurr wrote:


no need to fear doing blockwork round oddly angled drains.


Years ago I thought it might look nice to do some block paving round
circular flower beds and various other curved edges...

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...kPavedPath.jpg

It all looked nice, but at the time I did not really think through the
consequences of cutting in all the blocks:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...hCuttingIn.jpg

It took a couple of days to cut them all in, and by the time it was done
we must have had half a ton of left over offcuts!

(still we needed some hardcore for under another bit of paving elsewhere)


I'd have been most tempted to do the infill in some sort of radial pattern to avoid all that cutting.


NT
  #24   Report Post  
Old January 11th 19, 10:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 22,408
Default Resin 'paving'.

On 11/01/2019 21:52, wrote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 11:42:41 UTC, John Rumm wrote:
On 10/01/2019 21:48, tabbypurr wrote:


no need to fear doing blockwork round oddly angled drains.


Years ago I thought it might look nice to do some block paving round
circular flower beds and various other curved edges...

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...kPavedPath.jpg

It all looked nice, but at the time I did not really think through the
consequences of cutting in all the blocks:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...hCuttingIn.jpg

It took a couple of days to cut them all in, and by the time it was done
we must have had half a ton of left over offcuts!

(still we needed some hardcore for under another bit of paving elsewhere)


I'd have been most tempted to do the infill in some sort of radial pattern to avoid all that cutting.


Then you would have to cut them lengthways and into a taper to avoid
large gaps!


--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #25   Report Post  
Old January 12th 19, 12:21 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: May 2018
Posts: 10
Default Resin 'paving'.

On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 21:42:58 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

On 11/01/2019 15:42, Mark Allread wrote:

extract:
"Please note: different rules apply to paving over your front garden.


Fairy snuff, I sit corrected!


:-) no worries.


  #26   Report Post  
Old January 12th 19, 12:22 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: May 2018
Posts: 10
Default Resin 'paving'.

On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 18:31:18 +0000, ARW wrote:

On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:


But for the OP I'd say that it would be better to hire a Stihl saw and
cut the paving around the manholes if they cannot be easily
repositioned more 'squarely'. The job will look a lot better.


Would a 9 inch angle grinder do?


Never tried it with an angle grinder but I'm not sure you would get as
good a finish on the 'cut' edge.

  #27   Report Post  
Old January 12th 19, 05:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
ARW ARW is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2012
Posts: 8,352
Default Resin 'paving'.

On 11/01/2019 15:42, Mark Allread wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:22:08 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:00:06 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

In article ,
Steve Walker writes:
On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:
In article ,
R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.

Note the above - the drive is not being done.


Whether its the drive is not the relevant bit. Any impermeable hard
standing counts, regardless of if its a drive, patio, tennis court etc.


See:

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/inf...n_projects/44/
patio_and_driveway

extract:
"Please note: different rules apply to paving over your front garden.

Elsewhere around your house there are no restrictions on the area of land
which you can cover with hard surfaces at, or near, ground level.

However, significant works of embanking or terracing to support a hard
surface might need a planning application.

If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent
for any significant works whether internal or external.

Please note: The permitted development allowances described here apply to
houses and not to:

Flats and maisonettes (view our guidance on flats and maisonettes)
Converted houses or houses created through the permitted development
rights to change use (as detailed in our change of use section)
Other buildings
Areas where there may be a planning condition, Article 4 Direction or
other restriction that limits permitted development rights.

Also note that these rules only cover your Patio/Driveway."
end extract



And there is this one.

https://goo.gl/maps/E1VHRmttLqj

Street view will take you back to 2009 and up to May 2018.

Every piece of garden is now concrete (trust me there has been more
concrete laid since the May 2018 Streetview picture).

--
Adam
  #28   Report Post  
Old January 12th 19, 06:45 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 32,238
Default Resin 'paving'.



"ARW" wrote in message
...
On 11/01/2019 15:42, Mark Allread wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:22:08 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:00:06 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

In article ,
Steve Walker writes:
On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:
In article ,
R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.

Note the above - the drive is not being done.

Whether its the drive is not the relevant bit. Any impermeable hard
standing counts, regardless of if its a drive, patio, tennis court etc.


See:

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/inf...n_projects/44/
patio_and_driveway

extract:
"Please note: different rules apply to paving over your front garden.

Elsewhere around your house there are no restrictions on the area of land
which you can cover with hard surfaces at, or near, ground level.

However, significant works of embanking or terracing to support a hard
surface might need a planning application.

If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent
for any significant works whether internal or external.

Please note: The permitted development allowances described here apply to
houses and not to:

Flats and maisonettes (view our guidance on flats and maisonettes)
Converted houses or houses created through the permitted development
rights to change use (as detailed in our change of use section)
Other buildings
Areas where there may be a planning condition, Article 4 Direction or
other restriction that limits permitted development rights.

Also note that these rules only cover your Patio/Driveway."
end extract



And there is this one.

https://goo.gl/maps/E1VHRmttLqj

Street view will take you back to 2009 and up to May 2018.

Every piece of garden is now concrete (trust me there has been more
concrete laid since the May 2018 Streetview picture).


Fark, we don’t get anything like that sort of streetview history.

And I saw the google streetview camera car here almost a year
ago now and it still hasn’t been updated. Something must have
been comprehensively ****ed with the system in the car or something.

  #29   Report Post  
Old January 13th 19, 02:51 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2015
Posts: 10,209
Default Resin 'paving'.

On Friday, 11 January 2019 22:52:45 UTC, John Rumm wrote:
On 11/01/2019 21:52, tabbypurr wrote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 11:42:41 UTC, John Rumm wrote:
On 10/01/2019 21:48, tabbypurr wrote:


no need to fear doing blockwork round oddly angled drains.

Years ago I thought it might look nice to do some block paving round
circular flower beds and various other curved edges...

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...kPavedPath.jpg

It all looked nice, but at the time I did not really think through the
consequences of cutting in all the blocks:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...CuttingIn..jpg

It took a couple of days to cut them all in, and by the time it was done
we must have had half a ton of left over offcuts!

(still we needed some hardcore for under another bit of paving elsewhere)


I'd have been most tempted to do the infill in some sort of radial pattern to avoid all that cutting.


Then you would have to cut them lengthways and into a taper to avoid
large gaps!


The ones you laid radially didn't have excessive gaps, or maybe I misremembered that. More would not be in a smaller circle. You can always cut every 4th one or so if gaps are a problem. It would be easier to move to the smaller rectangular blocks, less length equals far less gap size. Or go with stone.


NT
  #30   Report Post  
Old January 13th 19, 08:20 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 22,408
Default Resin 'paving'.

On 13/01/2019 02:51, wrote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 22:52:45 UTC, John Rumm wrote:
On 11/01/2019 21:52, tabbypurr wrote:
On Friday, 11 January 2019 11:42:41 UTC, John Rumm wrote:
On 10/01/2019 21:48, tabbypurr wrote:

no need to fear doing blockwork round oddly angled drains.

Years ago I thought it might look nice to do some block paving
round circular flower beds and various other curved edges...

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...kPavedPath.jpg



It all looked nice, but at the time I did not really think through the
consequences of cutting in all the blocks:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...hCuttingIn.jpg



It took a couple of days to cut them all in, and by the time it was done
we must have had half a ton of left over offcuts!

(still we needed some hardcore for under another bit of paving
elsewhere)

I'd have been most tempted to do the infill in some sort of
radial pattern to avoid all that cutting.


Then you would have to cut them lengthways and into a taper to
avoid large gaps!


The ones you laid radially didn't have excessive gaps


True, but I cheated by filling those gaps with black mortar - no too
onerous as the edging courses which have to be fully bedded anyway. The
main infill however is just grouted with fine sand, so the gaps have to
be small.


, or maybe I
misremembered that. More would not be in a smaller circle. You can
always cut every 4th one or so if gaps are a problem. It would be
easier to move to the smaller rectangular blocks, less length equals
far less gap size. Or go with stone.


There is a limit on how small you can go on blocks on a sand bed if you
want to ensure they can't get pushed into the bed with normal traffic
(why ideally you break the pattern in places where you would end up with
less than about a third of a block)

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shower Tray - Resin Stone V Resin Polymer Markt UK diy 1 December 6th 10 05:20 PM
Shower Tray - Resin Stone V Resin Polymer Markt UK diy 0 December 6th 10 12:51 PM
Paving over existing paving robert UK diy 1 March 27th 08 07:01 PM
Coving - plaster/poly/resin - pros and cons SteveRoche UK diy 2 May 22nd 04 11:11 PM
Shelving and fixings -polyester resin? Ashley UK diy 9 October 24th 03 11:31 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:29 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017