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Old January 11th 19, 11:30 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Resin 'paving'.

On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:00:06 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

In article ,
Steve Walker writes:
On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:
In article ,
R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.


Note the above - the drive is not being done.

There are a couple of manholes at jaunty angles though and a soil
pipe so I can see a lot of cutting and faffing so wondered about the
resin stuff that I'm seeing advertised for drives.

probably not allowed under current building regs. Surfaces like drives
need to be permeable.


Its not the drive.

Non-permeable surfaces are allowed, but they must drain to a soakaway.


You now need planning permission to install a non-permeable driveway,


Its not the drive that is being done.

But for the OP I'd say that it would be better to hire a Stihl saw and
cut the paving around the manholes if they cannot be easily repositioned
more 'squarely'. The job will look a lot better.


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Old January 11th 19, 11:42 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Resin 'paving'.

On 10/01/2019 21:48, wrote:
On Thursday, 10 January 2019 18:00:49 UTC, R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.

There are a couple of manholes at jaunty angles though and a soil pipe
so I can see a lot of cutting and faffing so wondered about the resin
stuff that I'm seeing advertised for drives.

Anyone got any opinion or experience? Is it DIYable?


no need to fear doing blockwork round oddly angled drains.


Years ago I thought it might look nice to do some block paving round
circular flower beds and various other curved edges...

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...kPavedPath.jpg

It all looked nice, but at the time I did not really think through the
consequences of cutting in all the blocks:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...hCuttingIn.jpg

It took a couple of days to cut them all in, and by the time it was done
we must have had half a ton of left over offcuts!

(still we needed some hardcore for under another bit of paving elsewhere)


--
Cheers,

John.

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Old January 11th 19, 12:27 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Resin 'paving'.

On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:
In article ,
R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.


There are a couple of manholes at jaunty angles though and a soil pipe
so I can see a lot of cutting and faffing so wondered about the resin
stuff that I'm seeing advertised for drives.


Anyone got any opinion or experience? Is it DIYable?


probably not allowed under current building regs. Surfaces like drives need
to be permeable.


The key phrase was 'back of our house'.

There is nothing in building regs to dictate what you can do in
your back garden.

Only if your front garden (that leads onto a highway) slopes
towards the road, are you supposed to install a drainage
system to prvent surface water spilling onto the highway.

In my village I have seen at least 6 houses block pave
their front garden and no attempt to provide drainage, by
a company (pikey-sounding) who probably undercuts a local
tradesman who does a proper job.
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Old January 11th 19, 03:22 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Resin 'paving'.

On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:00:06 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

In article ,
Steve Walker writes:
On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:
In article ,
R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.


Note the above - the drive is not being done.


Whether its the drive is not the relevant bit. Any impermeable hard
standing counts, regardless of if its a drive, patio, tennis court etc.



--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/


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Old January 11th 19, 03:42 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Resin 'paving'.

On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:22:08 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

On 11/01/2019 11:30, Mark Allread wrote:
On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:00:06 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

In article ,
Steve Walker writes:
On 10/01/2019 18:19, charles wrote:
In article ,
R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.


Note the above - the drive is not being done.


Whether its the drive is not the relevant bit. Any impermeable hard
standing counts, regardless of if its a drive, patio, tennis court etc.


See:

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/inf...n_projects/44/
patio_and_driveway

extract:
"Please note: different rules apply to paving over your front garden.

Elsewhere around your house there are no restrictions on the area of land
which you can cover with hard surfaces at, or near, ground level.

However, significant works of embanking or terracing to support a hard
surface might need a planning application.

If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent
for any significant works whether internal or external.

Please note: The permitted development allowances described here apply to
houses and not to:

Flats and maisonettes (view our guidance on flats and maisonettes)
Converted houses or houses created through the permitted development
rights to change use (as detailed in our change of use section)
Other buildings
Areas where there may be a planning condition, Article 4 Direction or
other restriction that limits permitted development rights.

Also note that these rules only cover your Patio/Driveway."
end extract

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Old January 11th 19, 03:51 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Resin 'paving'.

On Thursday, 10 January 2019 18:00:49 UTC, R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.

There are a couple of manholes at jaunty angles though and a soil pipe
so I can see a lot of cutting and faffing so wondered about the resin
stuff that I'm seeing advertised for drives.

Anyone got any opinion or experience? Is it DIYable?


They did it on the highway outside our house about six months ago.
High friction grit glued down.
Seems to be holding out OK.
  #19   Report Post  
Old January 11th 19, 03:54 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Resin 'paving'.

On Thursday, 10 January 2019 18:49:10 UTC, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 10/01/19 18:19, charles wrote:
In article ,
R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.


There are a couple of manholes at jaunty angles though and a soil pipe
so I can see a lot of cutting and faffing so wondered about the resin
stuff that I'm seeing advertised for drives.


Anyone got any opinion or experience? Is it DIYable?


probably not allowed under current building regs. Surfaces like drives need
to be permeable.


Maybe if you are doing one from scratch, but what if you are replacing
one impermeable surface (concrete) by another (resin)? Is there a
difference if the resin in laid on top of the concrete, or the concreter
removed first and the resin laid on a prepared base? If the latter, do
the base and resin have to be permeable?

--

Jeff


It's all bollix anyway. The permeable bit soon blocks up with moss and general crap.
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Old January 11th 19, 05:00 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Resin 'paving'.

On 11/01/2019 15:51, harry wrote:
On Thursday, 10 January 2019 18:00:49 UTC, R D S wrote:
I fancy doing some paving at the back of our house to replace some
poorly laid concrete.

There are a couple of manholes at jaunty angles though and a soil pipe
so I can see a lot of cutting and faffing so wondered about the resin
stuff that I'm seeing advertised for drives.

Anyone got any opinion or experience? Is it DIYable?


They did it on the highway outside our house about six months ago.
High friction grit glued down.
Seems to be holding out OK.


As usual harry replies with an answer that's not relevant to the question.



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