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Old January 18th 04, 06:43 PM
James W
 
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Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame

I have a deep window frame above my front door. It currently has a
single glazed pane in it. I was wondering whether anyone has had any
experience getting a correct sized double glazed pane made up and
fitting it into the existing frame.

Are glazing companies willing to make a double glazed pane for this?
And would it be cheap enough to be worthwhile. Also, would the double
glazed pane fit OK into the existing pane? It is deep enough to
accomodate the pane from what I can tell.

Thanks in advance

Jim

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Old January 18th 04, 07:07 PM
Coherers
 
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Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame

You can get sealed units made up, however there are issues with respect to
getting the units to last. Apparently they will fail ( mist up) if not
fitted to allow for proper ventilation around the edges. And they require
deeper rebates.

Check out the following web site - they seem very knowledgeable on the
forum:

www.thewindowman.co.uk

There is an "e-book" for download there, giving the ins and outs of fitting
sealed units in old frames:

http://www.thewindowman.co.uk/Ebook_...s_drainage.pdf

Been meaning to try replacing one myself, but not got around to it yet...

"coherers"


"James W" wrote in message
om...
I have a deep window frame above my front door. It currently has a
single glazed pane in it. I was wondering whether anyone has had any
experience getting a correct sized double glazed pane made up and
fitting it into the existing frame.

Are glazing companies willing to make a double glazed pane for this?
And would it be cheap enough to be worthwhile. Also, would the double
glazed pane fit OK into the existing pane? It is deep enough to
accomodate the pane from what I can tell.

Thanks in advance

Jim



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Old January 18th 04, 07:12 PM
Grunff
 
Posts: n/a
Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame

James W wrote:
I have a deep window frame above my front door. It currently has a
single glazed pane in it. I was wondering whether anyone has had any
experience getting a correct sized double glazed pane made up and
fitting it into the existing frame.

Are glazing companies willing to make a double glazed pane for this?
And would it be cheap enough to be worthwhile. Also, would the double
glazed pane fit OK into the existing pane? It is deep enough to
accomodate the pane from what I can tell.


You need to be able to accommodate a unit at least 12mm thick. Most good
DG companies will supply you with a sealed unit, and they are
surprisingly cheap. I recently bought 8 of them (1.5x1.2m average) at
about 50 each.

The key point is that it must not end up sitting in a puddle of water in
the frame. This is easily avoided through careful sealing.

--
Grunff
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Old January 18th 04, 08:04 PM
Mary Fisher
 
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Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame


"James W" wrote in message
om...
I have a deep window frame above my front door. It currently has a
single glazed pane in it. I was wondering whether anyone has had any
experience getting a correct sized double glazed pane made up and
fitting it into the existing frame.

Are glazing companies willing to make a double glazed pane for this?
And would it be cheap enough to be worthwhile. Also, would the double
glazed pane fit OK into the existing pane? It is deep enough to
accomodate the pane from what I can tell.


We've double glazed our whole house by getting the glass company to make
factory sealed units to exactly the size we specified. That's thirty five (I
think) units. Spouse fitted them over a couple of years so the cost - which
was VERY low - wasn't felt at all.

They've been perfect in every way. There has been absoutely no misting. They
were easy to fit (he does know what he's doing but with a little care and
intelligence anyone could do it - it's safer than single pane glazing). The
key is accurate measuring. For the largest panes - up to 4' square - it
needed two people because the units are heavy (on two ladders for 1st floor
lights); for others one person inside and one outside was a help but not
absolutely necessary. He did our 1st floor bedroom the week after being
discharged from hospital after a hip replacement.

What I like best is that we retain the timber frames and don't have the
reduced light which is inevitable with plastic frames. The relative cost was
unbelievably low and we were in control at all times. The only disruption
was one pane being out at any one time - at our convenience.

Go for it.

Mary

Thanks in advance

Jim



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Old January 18th 04, 08:42 PM
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame

On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 20:04:12 -0000, "Mary Fisher"
wrote:


"James W" wrote in message
. com...
I have a deep window frame above my front door. It currently has a
single glazed pane in it. I was wondering whether anyone has had any
experience getting a correct sized double glazed pane made up and
fitting it into the existing frame.

Are glazing companies willing to make a double glazed pane for this?
And would it be cheap enough to be worthwhile. Also, would the double
glazed pane fit OK into the existing pane? It is deep enough to
accomodate the pane from what I can tell.


We've double glazed our whole house by getting the glass company to make
factory sealed units to exactly the size we specified. That's thirty five (I
think) units. Spouse fitted them over a couple of years so the cost - which
was VERY low - wasn't felt at all.

They've been perfect in every way. There has been absoutely no misting. They
were easy to fit (he does know what he's doing but with a little care and
intelligence anyone could do it - it's safer than single pane glazing). The
key is accurate measuring. For the largest panes - up to 4' square - it
needed two people because the units are heavy (on two ladders for 1st floor
lights); for others one person inside and one outside was a help but not
absolutely necessary. He did our 1st floor bedroom the week after being
discharged from hospital after a hip replacement.

What I like best is that we retain the timber frames and don't have the
reduced light which is inevitable with plastic frames. The relative cost was
unbelievably low and we were in control at all times. The only disruption
was one pane being out at any one time - at our convenience.

Go for it.

Mary


Are you talking about sash frames and windows here, Mary? How did you
fit in the units and did you have to add to the sash weights if they
were sashes?



..andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl


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Old January 18th 04, 09:23 PM
Mary Fisher
 
Posts: n/a
Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 20:04:12 -0000, "Mary Fisher"
wrote:


"James W" wrote in message
. com...
I have a deep window frame above my front door. It currently has a
single glazed pane in it. I was wondering whether anyone has had any
experience getting a correct sized double glazed pane made up and
fitting it into the existing frame.

Are glazing companies willing to make a double glazed pane for this?
And would it be cheap enough to be worthwhile. Also, would the double
glazed pane fit OK into the existing pane? It is deep enough to
accomodate the pane from what I can tell.


We've double glazed our whole house by getting the glass company to make
factory sealed units to exactly the size we specified. That's thirty five

(I
think) units. Spouse fitted them over a couple of years so the cost -

which
was VERY low - wasn't felt at all.

They've been perfect in every way. There has been absoutely no misting.

They
were easy to fit (he does know what he's doing but with a little care and
intelligence anyone could do it - it's safer than single pane glazing).

The
key is accurate measuring. For the largest panes - up to 4' square - it
needed two people because the units are heavy (on two ladders for 1st

floor
lights); for others one person inside and one outside was a help but not
absolutely necessary. He did our 1st floor bedroom the week after being
discharged from hospital after a hip replacement.

What I like best is that we retain the timber frames and don't have the
reduced light which is inevitable with plastic frames. The relative cost

was
unbelievably low and we were in control at all times. The only disruption
was one pane being out at any one time - at our convenience.

Go for it.

Mary


Are you talking about sash frames and windows here, Mary? How did you
fit in the units and did you have to add to the sash weights if they
were sashes?


No, sorry, I should have specified.I suppose it they had been sashes I'd
have said so.

But I don't suppose he'd have been daunted by sashes and he has a collection
of lead which he occasionally casts into moulds for various purposes.
Working out the required added weight for the counterbalances would have
been the cerebral part of the exercise.

Mary





.andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl



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Old January 18th 04, 10:24 PM
Steve Walker
 
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Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame

On 18 Jan 2004 10:43:50 -0800, James W wrote:

I have a deep window frame above my front door. It currently has a
single glazed pane in it. I was wondering whether anyone has had any
experience getting a correct sized double glazed pane made up and
fitting it into the existing frame.

Are glazing companies willing to make a double glazed pane for this?
And would it be cheap enough to be worthwhile. Also, would the double
glazed pane fit OK into the existing pane? It is deep enough to
accomodate the pane from what I can tell.

Thanks in advance

Jim


Just in case you find that there is not enough depth for a double glazing
unit, it is possible to have a stepped unit made - ie the two panes of
glass are different sizes and the metal spacer is the size of the smaller
pane, allowing the unit to fit a rebate meant only for single glazing, held
in pace only by the larger pane.

Steve W
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Old January 18th 04, 10:52 PM
jacob
 
Posts: n/a
Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame

Waste of money. If it's broken and needs replacing double glazing
still a waste of money - don't bother.

cheers

Jacob
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Old January 18th 04, 11:44 PM
Dave Plowman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame

In article ,
James W wrote:
I have a deep window frame above my front door. It currently has a
single glazed pane in it. I was wondering whether anyone has had any
experience getting a correct sized double glazed pane made up and
fitting it into the existing frame.


Yup - did this recently.

Are glazing companies willing to make a double glazed pane for this?
And would it be cheap enough to be worthwhile. Also, would the double
glazed pane fit OK into the existing pane? It is deep enough to
accomodate the pane from what I can tell.


Yes - any decent glazier will order up a double glazed panel in any size.
But it can't just be fitted with putty - it needs to be fully sealed
against rain and must be in a flexible seal so when the frame moves
slightly it doesn't get subject to twisting, etc. The glazier will supply
materials and details.

If it's in a rebate it will probably have to be enlarged. If it's got
planted on beading, then this can be changed or moved.

--
*If a parsley farmer is sued, can they garnish his wages?

Dave Plowman London SW 12
RIP Acorn
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Old January 19th 04, 10:56 AM
jacob
 
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Default Putting a double glazed pane in an old frame

Heat loss through windows rule of thumb is about 10%.
Double glazing halves this and so saves 5% of heating component of
fuel bills.
Typically about 500 p.a. hence saving 25 p.a. Really not worth the
bother.
Higher proportion of heat lost through windows if the house is highly
insulated but the small saving is the same i.e. larger % of smaller
bill - still not worth it.
Add in rapid obsolescence of DG units makes it very costly - they all
mist up eventually.
Better to increase loft insulation, reduce draughts, thicker curtains
etc etc. Cheaper to install new gas condensing CH boiler will save
much more.
Double glazing expensive con.

cheers

Jacob


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