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Old April 23rd 10, 01:15 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence

I've just made a picket fence, with H3 treated timber (this is treated for above
ground use). I've trying to decide what to apply to it to provide some
additional protection, and also some cosmetic benefits. Our thinking is not to
paint (I know, best protection but more work and presumably cost, also we prefer
the natural wood look). A friend recommends boiled linseed oil. From I've
seen this would probably be the cheapest option, but how good is it? I read an
article that refers to these disadvantages:

*Sometimes linseed oil can take forever to dry... or stays sticky or doesn't dry
at all (not really a problem on a fence)
*No UV (ultraviolet) light resistance... UV causes more damage to exposed wood
than any other factor, destroying wood fibers and setting it up for attack by
mildew, fungus, and insects.
*Linseed oil is mildew food...Linseed oil is not completely denatured, so it can
encourage rather than discourage mildew growth.

Comments? Any other suggestions?

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Old April 23rd 10, 04:35 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence

On Apr 23, 12:15 pm, Gib Bogle wrote:
I've just made a picket fence, with H3 treated timber (this is treated for above
ground use). I've trying to decide what to apply to it to provide some
additional protection, and also some cosmetic benefits. Our thinking is not to
paint (I know, best protection but more work and presumably cost, also we prefer
the natural wood look).


I don't know about linseed oil outside. I think you would have to keep
applying it every year.
My picket fence is really easy to paint because each section is hung
on large screws and can easily be lifted off for painting. I rest them
on old sheets of corrugated iron and spray paint the fence, which is
20 times quicker than hand painting.
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Old April 23rd 10, 06:10 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence

Matty F wrote:
On Apr 23, 12:15 pm, Gib Bogle wrote:
I've just made a picket fence, with H3 treated timber (this is treated for above
ground use). I've trying to decide what to apply to it to provide some
additional protection, and also some cosmetic benefits. Our thinking is not to
paint (I know, best protection but more work and presumably cost, also we prefer
the natural wood look).


I don't know about linseed oil outside. I think you would have to keep
applying it every year.
My picket fence is really easy to paint because each section is hung
on large screws and can easily be lifted off for painting. I rest them
on old sheets of corrugated iron and spray paint the fence, which is
20 times quicker than hand painting.


I don't like the idea of annual applications.

My fence is all nailed together, no sections. Hand-made!

I guess the spray-painting idea is still possible, with a sheet of corrugated
iron for example, by leaning it up against the other side of the fence to catch
the excess spray.
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Old April 23rd 10, 12:10 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence

On 23 Apr, 01:15, Gib Bogle wrote:

A friend recommends boiled linseed oil.


Only thing linseed is the right oil for is a cricket bat.

I'd suggest a decent exterior varnish. A spar varnish (more elastic)
if the fence posts are long and thin.

If you want to stick with oil, then a danish oil. These are a 2/3rd
oil / 1/3rd varnish mix, although materials and proportions vary with
brands. Oils just don't last forever outdoors, but this is about as
good as it gets.

Organoil is, AFAIR, Australian and so ought to be available locally.
They've a range of pretty good outdoor oil and varnish finishes.
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Old April 24th 10, 12:44 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence


"Gib Bogle" wrote in message
...
I've just made a picket fence, with H3 treated timber (this is treated for
above ground use). I've trying to decide what to apply to it to provide
some additional protection, and also some cosmetic benefits. Our thinking
is not to paint (I know, best protection but more work and presumably
cost, also we prefer the natural wood look). A friend recommends boiled
linseed oil. From I've seen this would probably be the cheapest option,
but how good is it? I read an article that refers to these disadvantages:

*Sometimes linseed oil can take forever to dry... or stays sticky or
doesn't dry at all (not really a problem on a fence)
*No UV (ultraviolet) light resistance... UV causes more damage to exposed
wood than any other factor, destroying wood fibers and setting it up for
attack by mildew, fungus, and insects.
*Linseed oil is mildew food...Linseed oil is not completely denatured, so
it can encourage rather than discourage mildew growth.

Comments? Any other suggestions?


For a lot of things linseed oil = food. Not ideal for outdoors. The
'boiled' is supposed to set more quickly, but a walking stick I painted with
the Screwfix variety last year, has been in the airing cupboard ever since
and is still tacky...

Painted picket fence with expensive 'breathable' white coating one year;
mostly fallen off the next. Redid with ordinary outdoor gloss - fine but do
wear sunglasses while applying. Green algae and snail trails blast off with
modern pressure washer, but not on jet, or paint all gone and fence too.
(Slats stainless screwed on, cos kids round here like pulling them off, and
saves on rust in paint.)

S




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Old April 24th 10, 08:31 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence

Gib Bogle wrote:
Matty F wrote:
On Apr 23, 12:15 pm, Gib Bogle
wrote:
I've just made a picket fence, with H3 treated timber (this is
treated for above ground use). I've trying to decide what to apply
to it to provide some additional protection, and also some cosmetic
benefits. Our thinking is not to paint (I know, best protection
but more work and presumably cost, also we prefer the natural
wood look).


I don't know about linseed oil outside. I think you would have to
keep applying it every year.
My picket fence is really easy to paint because each section is hung
on large screws and can easily be lifted off for painting. I rest
them on old sheets of corrugated iron and spray paint the fence,
which is 20 times quicker than hand painting.


I don't like the idea of annual applications.

My fence is all nailed together, no sections. Hand-made!

I guess the spray-painting idea is still possible, with a sheet of
corrugated iron for example, by leaning it up against the other side
of the fence to catch the excess spray.


IMO painting a fence is making a rod for your own back. Paint forms a
coating on the surface which will bubble/flake/blister eventually. Better
off with one of the specialised fench treatments.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


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Old April 24th 10, 09:30 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence

On Apr 24, 7:31 pm, "The Medway Handyman" [email protected]
blueyonder.co.uk wrote:
Gib Bogle wrote:
Matty F wrote:
On Apr 23, 12:15 pm, Gib Bogle
wrote:
I've just made a picket fence, with H3 treated timber (this is
treated for above ground use). I've trying to decide what to apply
to it to provide some additional protection, and also some cosmetic
benefits. Our thinking is not to paint (I know, best protection
but more work and presumably cost, also we prefer the natural
wood look).


I don't know about linseed oil outside. I think you would have to
keep applying it every year.
My picket fence is really easy to paint because each section is hung
on large screws and can easily be lifted off for painting. I rest
them on old sheets of corrugated iron and spray paint the fence,
which is 20 times quicker than hand painting.


I don't like the idea of annual applications.


My fence is all nailed together, no sections. Hand-made!


I guess the spray-painting idea is still possible, with a sheet of
corrugated iron for example, by leaning it up against the other side
of the fence to catch the excess spray.


IMO painting a fence is making a rod for your own back. Paint forms a
coating on the surface which will bubble/flake/blister eventually. Better
off with one of the specialised fench treatments.


I have a tin of Wattyl Deck and Furniture Oil which should be suitable
for a fence, and can be touched up easily if necessary.
Otherwise if the fence is H3 Radiata Pine it needs no treatment and
will turn a silver colour.
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Old April 24th 10, 10:37 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence

The Medway Handyman wrote:
Gib Bogle wrote:
Matty F wrote:
On Apr 23, 12:15 pm, Gib Bogle
wrote:
I've just made a picket fence, with H3 treated timber (this is
treated for above ground use). I've trying to decide what to apply
to it to provide some additional protection, and also some cosmetic
benefits. Our thinking is not to paint (I know, best protection
but more work and presumably cost, also we prefer the natural
wood look).
I don't know about linseed oil outside. I think you would have to
keep applying it every year.
My picket fence is really easy to paint because each section is hung
on large screws and can easily be lifted off for painting. I rest
them on old sheets of corrugated iron and spray paint the fence,
which is 20 times quicker than hand painting.

I don't like the idea of annual applications.

My fence is all nailed together, no sections. Hand-made!

I guess the spray-painting idea is still possible, with a sheet of
corrugated iron for example, by leaning it up against the other side
of the fence to catch the excess spray.


IMO painting a fence is making a rod for your own back. Paint forms a
coating on the surface which will bubble/flake/blister eventually. Better
off with one of the specialised fench treatments.


French? Ah, fence. I think the same way. I guess what you're saying is don't
go half way with linseed oil, but use something more targetted to the application.
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Old April 24th 10, 10:39 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 259
Default Linseed oil on a fence

Andy Dingley wrote:
On 23 Apr, 01:15, Gib Bogle wrote:

A friend recommends boiled linseed oil.


Only thing linseed is the right oil for is a cricket bat.

I'd suggest a decent exterior varnish. A spar varnish (more elastic)
if the fence posts are long and thin.

If you want to stick with oil, then a danish oil. These are a 2/3rd
oil / 1/3rd varnish mix, although materials and proportions vary with
brands. Oils just don't last forever outdoors, but this is about as
good as it gets.

Organoil is, AFAIR, Australian and so ought to be available locally.
They've a range of pretty good outdoor oil and varnish finishes.


Will check it out.
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Old April 24th 10, 10:41 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Linseed oil on a fence

Matty F wrote:
On Apr 24, 7:31 pm, "The Medway Handyman" [email protected]
blueyonder.co.uk wrote:
Gib Bogle wrote:
Matty F wrote:


I have a tin of Wattyl Deck and Furniture Oil which should be suitable
for a fence, and can be touched up easily if necessary.
Otherwise if the fence is H3 Radiata Pine it needs no treatment and
will turn a silver colour.


Thanks for that suggestion. I agree about the "no treatment" policy (it's all
H2 pine), but her indoors has other ideas - she thinks that attractive silver
colour looks old and tired and uncared-for.


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