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Old December 20th 09, 05:20 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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I have just watched a prog on digital tv (Ideal world) and they were
demonstrating a drill set that can drill through wood, plaster, brick,
concrete, tiles, mild steel, cast iron and bricks. See www.idealworld.tv

They were saying that they were a tipped drill and the tip was
cryogenically frozen cobalt. Now I have been around drills all my
working life and I can't understand how a drill can keep an edge on
these materials. They did demonstrate what would happen with this drill,
compared to a carbide tipped drill, by pushing it tip first into a
normal carbide grinding wheel. Their drill formed a groove in the wheel,
the carbide tipped drill had its tip ground back.

Has anyone come across them before?

Dave

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Old December 20th 09, 05:47 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Dave explained on 20/12/2009 :
They did demonstrate what would happen with this drill, compared to a carbide
tipped drill, by pushing it tip first into a normal carbide grinding wheel.
Their drill formed a groove in the wheel, the carbide tipped drill had its
tip ground back.


Dunno if they are actually any good, but....

Any form of carbide will make a groove in a normal (gray or white)
grinding wheel. A green wheel is needed to sharpen carbide.

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Old December 20th 09, 06:31 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Dave wrote:

I have just watched a prog on digital tv (Ideal world) and they were
demonstrating a drill set that can drill through wood, plaster, brick,
concrete, tiles, mild steel, cast iron and bricks. See
www.idealworld.tv
They were saying that they were a tipped drill and the tip was
cryogenically frozen cobalt. Now I have been around drills all my
working life and I can't understand how a drill can keep an edge on
these materials. They did demonstrate what would happen with this
drill, compared to a carbide tipped drill, by pushing it tip first
into a normal carbide grinding wheel. Their drill formed a groove in
the wheel, the carbide tipped drill had its tip ground back.

Has anyone come across them before?

Dave



You often see them demonstrated at Ideal Home exhibitions and Tool Fairs
etc. - where they invariably show them drilling through hardened steel
files, etc. I've got a set and they *do* work - and will go through most
materials. They're quite useful in situations when you're not quite sure
what you're going to encounter - like drilling above windows when you don't
know whether the lintel is concrete or steel. But I wouldn't regard them as
precision devices, and normally prefer the correct drill for the material -
wood bit for wood, HSS for steel, SDS for concrete, etc.
--
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Roger
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Old December 20th 09, 07:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Dave
wibbled on Sunday 20 December 2009 17:20

I have just watched a prog on digital tv (Ideal world) and they were
demonstrating a drill set that can drill through wood, plaster, brick,
concrete, tiles, mild steel, cast iron and bricks. See www.idealworld.tv

They were saying that they were a tipped drill and the tip was
cryogenically frozen cobalt. Now I have been around drills all my
working life and I can't understand how a drill can keep an edge on
these materials. They did demonstrate what would happen with this drill,
compared to a carbide tipped drill, by pushing it tip first into a
normal carbide grinding wheel. Their drill formed a groove in the wheel,
the carbide tipped drill had its tip ground back.

Has anyone come across them before?

Dave


http://www.screwfix.com/prods/95958

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Old December 20th 09, 10:23 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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In article ,
Dave writes:
I have just watched a prog on digital tv (Ideal world) and they were
demonstrating a drill set that can drill through wood, plaster, brick,
concrete, tiles, mild steel, cast iron and bricks. See www.idealworld.tv

They were saying that they were a tipped drill and the tip was
cryogenically frozen cobalt.


What does cryogenically frozen mean when it freezes at 1495C?
Dunked in water, perhaps?

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Old December 20th 09, 11:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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On 20 Dec, 19:09, Tim W wrote:
Dave


Has anyone come across them before?


Cobalt-unobtainium alloy drill bits have been around for decades, but
are a very niche market. Locksmithing is one user of them, for
drilling hardplate in safes. Certainly the chap demonstrating drilling
through files was at the model engineer exhibition 30 years ago.

They're less useful than you'd think. Just how often do you need to
drill something that won't respond to a carbide masonry bit, or decent
HSS ? I've used mine a few times (every couple of years), but always
for demolishing stuff, not for fabrication. As always when drilling
out broken drill stubs etc., wandering sideways into the softer metal
is a huge problem.


http://www.screwfix.com/prods/95958


Those aren't.

The usual "cobalt" drills these days have a "cobalt" (sic) coating on
them, giving a bluish rainbow look. They're cheap, Chinese, and made
of a secret alloy of rubber and bananas. No earthly use for anything.
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Old December 21st 09, 09:07 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Andy Dingley
wibbled on Sunday 20 December 2009 23:52



http://www.screwfix.com/prods/95958


Those aren't.

The usual "cobalt" drills these days have a "cobalt" (sic) coating on
them, giving a bluish rainbow look. They're cheap, Chinese, and made
of a secret alloy of rubber and bananas. No earthly use for anything.


Yeah - I was thinking more about the claimed ability to drill various
substrates. The Bosch drills do work, (limited depending on substrate, very
well on others).

If I were the OP I'd buy the Bosch which has some record of usability before
a random TV ad set.

Cheers

Tim


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Old December 21st 09, 11:16 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Tim W wrote:

Yeah - I was thinking more about the claimed ability to drill various
substrates. The Bosch drills do work, (limited depending on substrate,
very well on others).


In desperation I tried these Bosch ones from screwfix to drill out a broken
drill bit is a feed auger, it made no progress and then the tip
disintegrated.

AJH
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Old December 21st 09, 11:33 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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(Andrew Gabriel) writes:

In article ,
Dave writes:
I have just watched a prog on digital tv (Ideal world) and they were
demonstrating a drill set that can drill through wood, plaster, brick,
concrete, tiles, mild steel, cast iron and bricks. See
www.idealworld.tv

They were saying that they were a tipped drill and the tip was
cryogenically frozen cobalt.


What does cryogenically frozen mean when it freezes at 1495°C?
Dunked in water, perhaps?


If you solidify metal quickly enough you can get metallic glass.
(My metallurgy supervisor was working on this thirty years ago
by dipping a thermally massive rotating wheel into molten metal,
resulting in a ribbon of metallic glass whizzing off. I've no
idea of the current state of the art.) Dropping hot cobalt into
liquid nitrogen might do it, but whether cobalt glass is any use
for anything, I can't say.

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Jón Fairbairn
http://www.chaos.org.uk/~jf/Stuff-I-dont-want.html (updated 2009-01-31)
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Old December 21st 09, 11:22 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold. I remember Jon Fairbairn
saying something like:

If you solidify metal quickly enough you can get metallic glass.
(My metallurgy supervisor was working on this thirty years ago
by dipping a thermally massive rotating wheel into molten metal,
resulting in a ribbon of metallic glass whizzing off. I've no
idea of the current state of the art.) Dropping hot cobalt into
liquid nitrogen might do it, but whether cobalt glass is any use
for anything, I can't say.


Reminds me of dropping molten lead into a bucket of water. Weird spikey
shapes.


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