UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old October 20th 08, 02:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2007
Posts: 227
Default RCBOs - the wiggly blue madness!

If you were to fill a large consumer unit with RCBOs, it looks to me
like you'd have trouble fitting all the wires in, let alone connect
the final circuits. Is there a knack to dealing with all the wiggly
blue wires, or a best practice? Alternatively is there a make of CU
that has more room inside?

T

  #2   Report Post  
Old October 20th 08, 02:59 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,538
Default RCBOs - the wiggly blue madness!

coughed up some electrons that declared:

If you were to fill a large consumer unit with RCBOs, it looks to me
like you'd have trouble fitting all the wires in, let alone connect
the final circuits. Is there a knack to dealing with all the wiggly
blue wires, or a best practice? Alternatively is there a make of CU
that has more room inside?

T


I'm in the process of ordering a Hager industrial Type A metal board (like
this:

http://www.sparksdirect.co.uk/hager-...d-p-14028.html

But the 20way version
)

It claims to be roomy. It's not an ugly board, but it's not very subtle
either - mine's getting a wiring cupboard built around it anyway.

I'll have mine in a couple of weeks - I can take photos if you can wait that
long.

Cheers

Tim
  #3   Report Post  
Old October 20th 08, 04:25 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,174
Default RCBOs - the wiggly blue madness!

In article ,
writes:
If you were to fill a large consumer unit with RCBOs, it looks to me
like you'd have trouble fitting all the wires in, let alone connect
the final circuits. Is there a knack to dealing with all the wiggly
blue wires, or a best practice? Alternatively is there a make of CU
that has more room inside?


I used MEM (now Eaton) Memshield2...

http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu1.jpg
http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu2.jpg

Bags of space inside. Very nice consumer units to work with.
Probably not cheap compared with domestic consumer units.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #4   Report Post  
Old October 20th 08, 05:19 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2008
Posts: 66
Default RCBOs - the wiggly blue madness!


"Andrew Gabriel" wrote in message
...
In article
,
writes:
If you were to fill a large consumer unit with RCBOs, it looks to me
like you'd have trouble fitting all the wires in, let alone connect
the final circuits. Is there a knack to dealing with all the wiggly
blue wires, or a best practice? Alternatively is there a make of CU
that has more room inside?


I used MEM (now Eaton) Memshield2...

http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu1.jpg
http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu2.jpg

Bags of space inside. Very nice consumer units to work with.
Probably not cheap compared with domestic consumer units.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]





Hi All,


welcome to electrics,




micky


  #5   Report Post  
Old October 20th 08, 05:47 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 158
Default RCBOs - the wiggly blue madness!


I used MEM (now Eaton) Memshield2...

http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu1.jpg
http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu2.jpg

Bags of space inside. Very nice consumer units to work with.
Probably not cheap compared with domestic consumer units.


I liked the way that example had a box before the CU which reduced the
number of wires in the CU. Wd that be OK in a domestic installation so
long as there is (as in your example) no gap between the 2 boxes (and of
course the singles are rated to cope)?
--
Robin




  #6   Report Post  
Old October 20th 08, 06:16 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,174
Default RCBOs - the wiggly blue madness!

In article ,
"neverwas" writes:

I used MEM (now Eaton) Memshield2...

http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu1.jpg
http://www.cucumber.demon.co.uk/cu2.jpg

Bags of space inside. Very nice consumer units to work with.
Probably not cheap compared with domestic consumer units.


I liked the way that example had a box before the CU which reduced the
number of wires in the CU. Wd that be OK in a domestic installation so
long as there is (as in your example) no gap between the 2 boxes (and of
course the singles are rated to cope)?


That's simply because the wires weren't long enough after
swapping the CU. I wouldn't do that if starting from scratch,
although it's fine from the regulatory point of view.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #7   Report Post  
Old October 20th 08, 11:37 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 158
Default RCBOs - the wiggly blue madness!

That's simply because the wires weren't long enough after
swapping the CU. I wouldn't do that if starting from scratch,
although it's fine from the regulatory point of view.


Thanks. I asked as I've faced just that situation; and what you had
done seemed to me much neater and more flexible than crimping on bits of
cable.
--
Robin




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mailbox madness HeyBub Home Repair 1 November 2nd 06 01:01 AM
wiggly dadoes? KJ Woodworking 14 August 29th 05 05:14 PM
Blue, blue, my world is blue -- is this fixable? Eric Vey Electronics Repair 2 September 24th 03 10:45 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:11 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017