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Default GLS lightbulb storage

Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned) the thought crosses my mind - do they
deteriorate in storage?

I'm talking about a prolonged time period up to 20 - 30 years (which
should see us out of chez nous into another world). I envisage
storing them in the attic and avoiding movement until needed.

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jim wrote:
Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned) the thought crosses my mind - do they
deteriorate in storage?

I'm talking about a prolonged time period up to 20 - 30 years (which
should see us out of chez nous into another world). I envisage
storing them in the attic and avoiding movement until needed.


I've been thinking of doing that as well.


--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
01634 717930
07850 597257


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"jim" wrote in message
ps.com...
Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned) the thought crosses my mind - do they
deteriorate in storage?

I'm talking about a prolonged time period up to 20 - 30 years (which
should see us out of chez nous into another world). I envisage
storing them in the attic and avoiding movement until needed.


Well I have several boxes of specialised light bulbs (odd voltages)
that I use on machine tools in my workshop, and most are at least 20
years old, and some older. I cannot remember ever pulling one out that
didn't work. These are mainly 24 & 48v bulbs in the same format as
normal mains ones (ie standard bayonet). It may be that the stouter
filament of a lower voltage aids longevity, but I would think that
would only be the case if stored where vibration were a problem.

AWEM

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On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 12:51:35 -0700, jim
wrote:

Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned) the thought crosses my mind - do they
deteriorate in storage?

I'm talking about a prolonged time period up to 20 - 30 years (which
should see us out of chez nous into another world). I envisage
storing them in the attic and avoiding movement until needed.


Seal 'em up in plastic, binbags or somesuch, they'll be fine. I'll be
doing the same.

DG

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Get a life any just use the newer bulds. Get good quality ones and
they come on as quick as the old GLs bulbs



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On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 14:53:22 -0700, Denis
wrote:

Get a life any just use the newer bulds. Get good quality ones and
they come on as quick as the old GLs bulbs


Like **** they do.

Have you measured them?

DG

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On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 21:02:52 +0100, "The Medway Handyman"
wrote:

jim wrote:
Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned) the thought crosses my mind - do they
deteriorate in storage?

I'm talking about a prolonged time period up to 20 - 30 years (which
should see us out of chez nous into another world). I envisage
storing them in the attic and avoiding movement until needed.


I've been thinking of doing that as well.


The guvmint will probably change the mains voltage just to bu&&er up
that idea...
Just think of all the VAT they'll make on new bulbs and appliances.

--
Frank Erskine
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jim wrote:

Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned) the thought crosses my mind - do they
deteriorate in storage?

I'm talking about a prolonged time period up to 20 - 30 years (which
should see us out of chez nous into another world). I envisage
storing them in the attic and avoiding movement until needed.


They dont deteriorate as long as kept dry. There's nothing in the
bulb envelope that will corrode the filament. Would be a good idea
to fully encase the bulbs so no cleaning needed.


NT

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Jeepers what a bunch of Luddites.

Get real, we're talking about bloody light bulbs here forchristsakes...

Cheers

Richard



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On 2007-09-30 11:01:53 +0100, "r.bartlett" said:




Jeepers what a bunch of Luddites.

Get real, we're talking about bloody light bulbs here forchristsakes...

Cheers

Richard


Exactly. The point is that people realise that they are being
manipulated and forced into something inferior in terms of usability
for no good reason.

Earlier discussions on this subject have been met with comments on both
sides of the debate with some people feeling that the energy saving is
worth it to them (be it for economic or feel-good reasons), while
others feel that aesthetic factors outweigh that.

Until now, both views have been catered for because both types of
product continue to be available.

In general terms, people have not been persuaded about the alleged
benefits of fluorescent lightbulbs or they would have gone out and
bought them and the market dynamics would have moved that way.

Given that situation, the government now attempts to force the issue by
coercing market forces.

People aren't that stupid. They know when they are being had and
subjected to hype.



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Andy Hall wrote:
On 2007-09-30 11:01:53 +0100, "r.bartlett" said:


Jeepers what a bunch of Luddites.

Get real, we're talking about bloody light bulbs here forchristsakes...

Cheers

Richard


Exactly. The point is that people realise that they are being
manipulated and forced into something inferior in terms of usability
for no good reason.

Earlier discussions on this subject have been met with comments on both
sides of the debate with some people feeling that the energy saving is
worth it to them (be it for economic or feel-good reasons), while
others feel that aesthetic factors outweigh that.

Until now, both views have been catered for because both types of
product continue to be available.

In general terms, people have not been persuaded about the alleged
benefits of fluorescent lightbulbs or they would have gone out and
bought them and the market dynamics would have moved that way.

Given that situation, the government now attempts to force the issue by
coercing market forces.

People aren't that stupid. They know when they are being had and
subjected to hype.


Its surely a move that indicates people that dont understand the
country theyre running. If CFL mfrs want to take over the bulb
market, let them solve the issues of their CFLs - most of which are
simple to resolve given a bit of awareness and profit incentive.


NT

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On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 10:01:53 GMT, "r.bartlett"
wrote:


Jeepers what a bunch of Luddites.


Bad example.

The power looms represented a quantum leap in performance over hand
weaving.

I can't put it any better than Huge did in an earlier thread ...

"Electric lighting supplanted gas which supplanted candles/oil lamps
because in each case the new technology was superior to the old. This
is not the case with the banning of filament bulbs, which is being
done for pointless political reasons by someone who neither knows nor
cares about the issues and upon whom the inconvenience and expense of
the change will not fall.

Now, here's your teaspoon. Get bailing".


Get real, we're talking about bloody light bulbs here forchristsakes...


If it seems trivial to you ask yourself why the government sees fit to
take away our freedom to use whatever lighting we choose.

DG

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On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 12:26:12 +0100, Derek Geldard
wrote:


If it seems trivial to you ask yourself why the government sees fit to
take away our freedom to use whatever lighting we choose.


The reason of course is that they have no choice in the matter. They
have been ordered to do so by Brussels. Philips in particular no
longer make any profit out of incandescent bulbs and have spent a
considerable amount of money "lobbying" EU bureaucrats (who really
cost quite small amounts to buy) to get this change through as they
believe it will open market opportunities for them.
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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On 2007-09-30 14:21:46 +0100, Peter Parry said:

On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 12:26:12 +0100, Derek Geldard
wrote:


If it seems trivial to you ask yourself why the government sees fit to
take away our freedom to use whatever lighting we choose.


The reason of course is that they have no choice in the matter. They
have been ordered to do so by Brussels.


.... and here was me thinking that we had just signed up for a glorified
trade agreement.

There is always a choice........


Philips in particular no
longer make any profit out of incandescent bulbs and have spent a
considerable amount of money "lobbying" EU bureaucrats (who really
cost quite small amounts to buy) to get this change through as they
believe it will open market opportunities for them.


It couldn't also be that Philips have supplied bulbs to hand out, could it?

All very convenient.


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I replaced all my 50w GU10's with Megaman 11w and they are by far and away
superior.So they don't light up instantly whoopie do..

In no time at all the pressure will be on the manufacturers to solve the
problems you all fear. That's how these things work.

I have no real love for forced democracy but like seatbelts sometimes you
have to think for the masses and tell them what's good for them

Cheers

Richard




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On 2007-09-30 19:20:41 +0100, "r.bartlett" said:

I replaced all my 50w GU10's with Megaman 11w and they are by far and away
superior.So they don't light up instantly whoopie do..


I tried one of these - same brand and same product - and thought that
it was crap. Poor light quality and dim. That's before one
considers the warm up time.



In no time at all the pressure will be on the manufacturers to solve the
problems you all fear. That's how these things work.


I wait with baited breath. They will also have to come up with
something that mechanically fits properly as well.


I have no real love for forced democracy but like seatbelts sometimes you
have to think for the masses and tell them what's good for them


Except this is good for nobody and for nothing apart from cheap capital
for politicians. It doesn't resolve any particular problem or even
significantly affect one.


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r.bartlett wrote:
I replaced all my 50w GU10's with Megaman 11w and they are by far and away
superior.So they don't light up instantly whoopie do..


I'm sitting under a couple of them as I type. They're whiter, cooler,
generally a good thing. If they're a little slow to start - doesn't
matter much.

In the downstairs toilet (the room that is!) I have an incandescent. It
comes on effectively immediately, is on for a short time, then off
again. If it breaks through too much power cycling, WTH the replacement
is pence and won't put mercury into landfill.

CFLs do have their place, but so do incandescents.

Andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

I wait with baited breath.


If you use cheese you might catch a mouse. If you combine it with garlic
you could probably kill it as well.
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Owain wrote:
r.bartlett wrote:
I have no real love for forced democracy but like seatbelts
sometimes you have to think for the masses and tell them what's good
for them


I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident
fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?


Can't see the logic in that. You get run over by a car, then the driver is
projected through the windscreen & lands on top of you?

According to paramedic daughter, serious injuries in RTC's are much lower
since the introduction of seat belts, air bags, crumple zones etc. The
older medics tell harrowing tales of RTC injuries rarely seen these days.
Compulsory crash helmets have reduced motorcycle fatalities, but not serious
injuries.

Just as well really, they need the time saved to deal with all the drunks &
druggies these days.


--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
01634 717930
07850 597257


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On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 20:25:09 +0100, Owain
wrote:

r.bartlett wrote:
I have no real love for forced democracy but like seatbelts sometimes you
have to think for the masses and tell them what's good for them


I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident
fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?


And for "Risk Compensation" .

Drivers think they are asbestos and drive round like Valkyries.

DG



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In article ,
Derek Geldard writes:
On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 20:25:09 +0100, Owain
wrote:
I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident
fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?


And for "Risk Compensation" .

Drivers think they are asbestos and drive round like Valkyries.


I've got this theory that if toy cars (matchbox cars in my day)
were made of aluminium foil, kids might grow up with a little
more appreciation of how fragile real cars are.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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"jim" wrote in message
ps.com...
Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned)


Imagine the fuss if the technology history had gone the other way and people
were suddenly expected to swap from CFL to Filament bilbs and pay up to 20
extra per light bulb in electricity costs - it would be 'bloody Labour
hidden taxes'.

Sorry, that should be up to "BLOODY 20 EXTRA PER YEAR and the bulbs don't
last as long!"





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"Andrew Gabriel" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Derek Geldard writes:
On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 20:25:09 +0100, Owain
wrote:
I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident
fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?


And for "Risk Compensation" .

Drivers think they are asbestos and drive round like Valkyries.


I've got this theory that if toy cars (matchbox cars in my day)
were made of aluminium foil, kids might grow up with a little
more appreciation of how fragile real cars are.


Alternative theories are
1) all car body/chassis units should be made of toughened glass - with a
yard brush in every boot; anything above the slightest collision leaves you
with a pile of glass, engine and electrics that you can just sweep into the
gutter.

2) every steering wheel should have a 15 inch steel spike pointing towards
the heart of the driver - 'just to keep your attention on the task in hand!"



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"The Medway Handyman" wrote in message
...
Owain wrote:
r.bartlett wrote:
I have no real love for forced democracy but like seatbelts
sometimes you have to think for the masses and tell them what's good
for them


I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident
fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?


Can't see the logic in that. You get run over by a car, then the driver
is projected through the windscreen & lands on top of you?

According to paramedic daughter, serious injuries in RTC's are much lower
since the introduction of seat belts, air bags, crumple zones etc. The
older medics tell harrowing tales of RTC injuries rarely seen these days.
Compulsory crash helmets have reduced motorcycle fatalities, but not
serious injuries.


I know of lots of traffic police who`ve never seen a dead body (in work),
because of all the added safety features over the years.

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On 30 Sep, 20:25, Owain wrote:
r.bartlett wrote:
I have no real love for forced democracy but like seatbelts sometimes you
have to think for the masses and tell them what's good for them


I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident
fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?

Owain


And a shortage in donor organs

Trevor

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"OG" wrote in message
...

"Andrew Gabriel" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Derek Geldard writes:
On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 20:25:09 +0100, Owain
wrote:
I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident
fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?

And for "Risk Compensation" .

Drivers think they are asbestos and drive round like Valkyries.


I've got this theory that if toy cars (matchbox cars in my day)
were made of aluminium foil, kids might grow up with a little
more appreciation of how fragile real cars are.


Alternative theories are
1) all car body/chassis units should be made of toughened glass - with a
yard brush in every boot; anything above the slightest collision leaves
you with a pile of glass, engine and electrics that you can just sweep
into the gutter.

2) every steering wheel should have a 15 inch steel spike pointing towards
the heart of the driver - 'just to keep your attention on the task in
hand!"


I always felt that, if all drivers were on an unprotected boom poking out
the front of the car, there would be no need for any safety measures or
speed limits at all!


--
Bob Mannix
(anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)







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On 2007-10-01 01:24:16 +0100, "OG" said:


"jim" wrote in message
ps.com...
Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned)


Imagine the fuss if the technology history had gone the other way and people
were suddenly expected to swap from CFL to Filament bilbs and pay up to 20
extra per light bulb in electricity costs - it would be 'bloody Labour
hidden taxes'.



Sorry, that should be up to "BLOODY 20 EXTRA PER YEAR and the bulbs don't
last as long!"


Except that like most other information presented by this government,
it would be a lie.

I notice that over the course of a few posts, the alleged saving has
varied from 10 to 60.

Quite a range of promises. Have you been taking lessons from Brown?
Perhaps people should be asked whether they actually *want* to have
CFL bulbs. There are other reasons than alleged cost saving for
purchasing decisions. I suppose that Benn believes that he can get
away with this scam unnoticed on the basis that his boss is trying it
on over an EU referendum.


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"Tony Bryer" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 1 Oct 2007 08:39:57 +0100 Bob Mannix wrote :
I always felt that, if all drivers were on an unprotected boom poking out
the front of the car, there would be no need for any safety measures or
speed limits at all!


No it wouldn't work since every teenage male driver knows that they
are indestructible.

--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk


More to the point, it doesn't seem to be working for motorcyclists, and the
safety record in the 1930s when cars were equipped with steel spikes ready
to be driven into the drivers chest (aka steering columns) wasn't anything
to be proud of.

Andy


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On Mon, 1 Oct 2007 08:39:57 +0100 Bob Mannix wrote :
I always felt that, if all drivers were on an unprotected boom poking out
the front of the car, there would be no need for any safety measures or
speed limits at all!


No it wouldn't work since every teenage male driver knows that they
are indestructible.

--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk

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Bob Mannix wrote:
"OG" wrote in message
...
"Andrew Gabriel" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Derek Geldard writes:
On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 20:25:09 +0100, Owain
wrote:


I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident
fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?

And for "Risk Compensation" .

Drivers think they are asbestos and drive round like Valkyries.

I've got this theory that if toy cars (matchbox cars in my day)
were made of aluminium foil, kids might grow up with a little
more appreciation of how fragile real cars are.


Alternative theories are
1) all car body/chassis units should be made of toughened glass - with a
yard brush in every boot; anything above the slightest collision leaves
you with a pile of glass, engine and electrics that you can just sweep
into the gutter.

2) every steering wheel should have a 15 inch steel spike pointing towards
the heart of the driver - 'just to keep your attention on the task in
hand!"


I always felt that, if all drivers were on an unprotected boom poking out
the front of the car, there would be no need for any safety measures or
speed limits at all!


Well its been tried, in the 1890s thats how motor cars were. The
driver was the forward-most thing, nothing in front. Speed limits or
not there were no speed cameras, and no-one around for many a
mile. Sprung steering could be a bugger though, put too many
people into a ditch.

And oh the reckless speeders! Terrible how some people went over
5 mph. Actually was terrible considering the standards of the
vehicles.


NT

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"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On 2007-10-01 01:24:16 +0100, "OG" said:


"jim" wrote in message
ps.com...
Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned)


Imagine the fuss if the technology history had gone the other way and
people
were suddenly expected to swap from CFL to Filament bilbs and pay up to
20
extra per light bulb in electricity costs - it would be 'bloody Labour
hidden taxes'.



Sorry, that should be up to "BLOODY 20 EXTRA PER YEAR and the bulbs
don't
last as long!"


Except that like most other information presented by this government, it
would be a lie.

I notice that over the course of a few posts, the alleged saving has
varied from 10 to 60.


Of course it has, sometimes it refers to the total lifetime saving (for
which 60 isn't unreasonable), and sometimes it refers to the annual saving
(which depends on how much you use the bulb - hence how many years the
saving is spread over).






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On 2007-10-01 19:09:30 +0100, "OG" said:


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On 2007-10-01 01:24:16 +0100, "OG" said:


"jim" wrote in message
ps.com...
Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned)

Imagine the fuss if the technology history had gone the other way and
people
were suddenly expected to swap from CFL to Filament bilbs and pay up to
20
extra per light bulb in electricity costs - it would be 'bloody Labour
hidden taxes'.



Sorry, that should be up to "BLOODY 20 EXTRA PER YEAR and the bulbs
don't
last as long!"


Except that like most other information presented by this government, it
would be a lie.

I notice that over the course of a few posts, the alleged saving has
varied from 10 to 60.


Of course it has, sometimes it refers to the total lifetime saving (for
which 60 isn't unreasonable), and sometimes it refers to the annual saving
(which depends on how much you use the bulb - hence how many years the
saving is spread over).



Which in comparison with the amount of heat required to keep the house
warm is 2/3 of bugger all.


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On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 20:24:26 +0100, Andy Champ
wrote:

r.bartlett wrote:
I replaced all my 50w GU10's with Megaman 11w and they are by far and away
superior.So they don't light up instantly whoopie do..


I'm sitting under a couple of them as I type. They're whiter, cooler,
generally a good thing. If they're a little slow to start - doesn't
matter much.


And they're much longer too and will not go into many fittings.

M
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