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  #1   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

Hi all,

I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.

I removed the tyre today and I was right, loads of ally 'fur' in
there? ;-(

So my intention is to just clean the inside of the rims out (I'm doing
the rear as well although that tyre was tubed so not leaking), spray
them with some acid-etch primer and a few coats of car spray paint to
seal them up. Normally I would do a full refurb on such things (like
getting them bead blasted etc) but the bikes not worth it .. so as
long as I sort the corrosion out and it looks 'ok' when finished that
will do this time.

I was wondering if there was an easy_to_obtain_and_use chemical that
would remove this 'corrosion' (sulphate?) easily please? (like vinegar
on lime scale etc).

If not I'll just stick a medium wire brush in the electric drill?

All the best ..

T i m

p.s. And it was interesting to find a 55.1 x 16 inner tube all
buckled up in the 4.1 x 16 rear tyre .. another reminder should one be
needed why I like to do / check these things myself ...
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Chris Bacon
 
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Default De-furring aluminium ..?

T i m wrote:
I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.

I removed the tyre today and I was right, loads of ally 'fur' in
there? ;-(

So my intention is to just clean the inside of the rims out (I'm doing
the rear as well although that tyre was tubed so not leaking), spray
them with some acid-etch primer and a few coats of car spray paint to
seal them up. Normally I would do a full refurb on such things (like
getting them bead blasted etc) but the bikes not worth it .. so as
long as I sort the corrosion out and it looks 'ok' when finished that
will do this time.

I was wondering if there was an easy_to_obtain_and_use chemical that
would remove this 'corrosion' (sulphate?) easily please? (like vinegar
on lime scale etc).

If not I'll just stick a medium wire brush in the electric drill?


If you could use a chemical means, it would leave a pitted
surface anyway. I's be inclined to brush it off, and use a
tubed tyre, if you want "cheap". You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.
  #3   Report Post  
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raden
 
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Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In message , T i m
writes
Hi all,

I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.



You need some

http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html

that's what you need

some

http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html

although you could probably do without the intro

--
geoff
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On 15 May 2006 22:39:11 +0200, Chris Bacon
wrote:

T i m wrote:
I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.

I removed the tyre today and I was right, loads of ally 'fur' in
there? ;-(

So my intention is to just clean the inside of the rims out (I'm doing
the rear as well although that tyre was tubed so not leaking), spray
them with some acid-etch primer and a few coats of car spray paint to
seal them up. Normally I would do a full refurb on such things (like
getting them bead blasted etc) but the bikes not worth it .. so as
long as I sort the corrosion out and it looks 'ok' when finished that
will do this time.

I was wondering if there was an easy_to_obtain_and_use chemical that
would remove this 'corrosion' (sulphate?) easily please? (like vinegar
on lime scale etc).

If not I'll just stick a medium wire brush in the electric drill?


If you could use a chemical means, it would leave a pitted
surface anyway.


Well from my experimental scrapings so far the surface under the
corrosion seems suprisingingly flat (I would of betted on 'well
pitted' looking at the amount of corrosion)?

I's be inclined to brush it off,


Failing a suitable 'chemical' solution g then brushing would be my
solution.

and use a
tubed tyre, if you want "cheap".


Cheap isn't something I generally mix with tyres .. especially
motorcycle ones. The rear tyre is infact brand new (I've probably done
50 miles on it) but it's tubed and not the same brand / model as the
front (Pirelli) so I've ordered a matching tubeless Pirelli for the
rear. Apart from liking them to be the same I like to use Ultraseal
(puncture preventer not 'get_you_home' stuff) and that works best in
tubeless tyres.

My old Rover was given to me with 'Happy Shopper' (or similar) brand
tyres fitted .. they were lethal .. swapped them for a set of Avons
(at nearly twice the cost of the car) .. much better ;-)

You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.


Ok I'll have a look. Were there many classic bikes with cast alloy
wheels Chris?

All the best ..

T i m

  #5   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Mon, 15 May 2006 20:50:15 GMT, raden wrote:

In message , T i m
writes
Hi all,

I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.



You need some

http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html

that's what you need

some

http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html

although you could probably do without the intro


Funny you should mention that as I was repling to Chris!

I'm not sure how well Ultraseal would work sealing a rim leak though
Geoff? I did once use 'Tyre weld' to cure a similar leak on my
Electric car as it had 4 wheels, didn't go very fast and wasn't ever
likely to wear them out (so wouldn't need to get them off). It worked
very well.

Ultraseal is very viscose and is designed to only protect the tread
erea of the tyre rather than the sidewall / rim area?

I suppose if it dribbled down into the rim gap when the bike was
stationary it could work there as well ..?

I will be fitting the stuff when I've properly sorted the rims though
... ;-)

All the best ..

T i m



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Posted to uk.d-i-y
raden
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In message , Chris Bacon
writes
T i m wrote:
I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.
I removed the tyre today and I was right, loads of ally 'fur' in
there? ;-(
So my intention is to just clean the inside of the rims out (I'm
doing
the rear as well although that tyre was tubed so not leaking), spray
them with some acid-etch primer and a few coats of car spray paint to
seal them up. Normally I would do a full refurb on such things (like
getting them bead blasted etc) but the bikes not worth it .. so as
long as I sort the corrosion out and it looks 'ok' when finished that
will do this time.
I was wondering if there was an easy_to_obtain_and_use chemical that
would remove this 'corrosion' (sulphate?) easily please? (like vinegar
on lime scale etc).
If not I'll just stick a medium wire brush in the electric drill?


If you could use a chemical means, it would leave a pitted
surface anyway. I's be inclined to brush it off, and use a
tubed tyre, if you want "cheap". You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.


It depends how you approach them

You've obviously discovered that they don't suffer fools gladly
--
geoff
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Posted to uk.d-i-y
Thomas Prufer
 
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Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Mon, 15 May 2006 17:12:31 GMT, T i m wrote:

I was wondering if there was an easy_to_obtain_and_use chemical that
would remove this 'corrosion' (sulphate?) easily please? (like vinegar
on lime scale etc).


Bike seat posts sometimes get stuck due to corrosion, and one chemical suggested
is ammonia.

Thomas Prufer
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Tue, 16 May 2006 00:03:27 +0200, Thomas Prufer
wrote:

On Mon, 15 May 2006 17:12:31 GMT, T i m wrote:

I was wondering if there was an easy_to_obtain_and_use chemical that
would remove this 'corrosion' (sulphate?) easily please? (like vinegar
on lime scale etc).


Bike seat posts sometimes get stuck due to corrosion, and one chemical suggested
is ammonia.


Ah, ok, where / how / what form do we buy that these days please?

All the best ..

T i m
  #9   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
raden
 
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Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In message , T i m
writes
I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.

You need some
http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html
that's what you need
some
http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html
although you could probably do without the intro


Funny you should mention that as I was repling to Chris!

I'm not sure how well Ultraseal would work sealing a rim leak though
Geoff? I did once use 'Tyre weld' to cure a similar leak on my
Electric car as it had 4 wheels, didn't go very fast and wasn't ever
likely to wear them out (so wouldn't need to get them off). It worked
very well.

It works

I've always had a slow leak on my GS750, which could only be down to a
scabby rim - gobbed a bit of ultraseal in and I haven't even had to fart
in it's general direction


--
geoff
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Thomas Prufer
 
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Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Mon, 15 May 2006 22:06:57 GMT, T i m wrote:

Ah, ok, where / how / what form do we buy that these days please?


Eh, dunno, being far from the UK... ("Ammonia" is correctly "aqueous solution of
ammonia" or "ammonium hydroxide", so Wiki tells me, just in case you end up at a
chemical supply house, where these differences matter.)

It's used for window cleaning, fuming oak, cleaning zinc before painting -- so
supermarket, diy wood/paints place, paint specialist might be the places to try.


Thomas Prufer


  #11   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Mon, 15 May 2006 23:07:16 GMT, raden wrote:

In message , T i m
writes
I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.
You need some
http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html
that's what you need
some
http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html
although you could probably do without the intro


Funny you should mention that as I was repling to Chris!

I'm not sure how well Ultraseal would work sealing a rim leak though
Geoff? I did once use 'Tyre weld' to cure a similar leak on my
Electric car as it had 4 wheels, didn't go very fast and wasn't ever
likely to wear them out (so wouldn't need to get them off). It worked
very well.

It works

I've always had a slow leak on my GS750, which could only be down to a
scabby rim - gobbed a bit of ultraseal in and I haven't even had to fart
in it's general direction


Hmmm, well that's interesting (I did nearly did as you have done but
as I wanted to change the rear tyre so .... ).

The good news is I will be putting Ultrasal in there anyway so if the
rims don't come up to scratch I know I'll be ok ;-)

Good stuff tho innit Geoff ;-)

All the best ..

T i m



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Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Tue, 16 May 2006 08:18:28 +0200, Thomas Prufer
wrote:

On Mon, 15 May 2006 22:06:57 GMT, T i m wrote:

Ah, ok, where / how / what form do we buy that these days please?


Eh, dunno, being far from the UK... ("Ammonia" is correctly "aqueous solution of
ammonia" or "ammonium hydroxide", so Wiki tells me, just in case you end up at a
chemical supply house, where these differences matter.)


Ok, cheers.

It's used for window cleaning, fuming oak, cleaning zinc before painting -- so
supermarket, diy wood/paints place, paint specialist might be the places to try.


Ok, I'll have a look today .. just out of interest .. any idea what
it does to the ally itself?

All the best ..

T i m
  #13   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Thomas Prufer
 
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Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Tue, 16 May 2006 06:30:08 GMT, T i m wrote:

Ok, I'll have a look today .. just out of interest .. any idea what
it does to the ally itself?


Wiki says "Solutions of ammonium hydroxide can also dissolve reactive metals
such as aluminum and zinc, with the liberation of hydrogen gas."

A professional painter in a German diy group says to etch zinc with ammonia
before painting, so I don't think dilute household ammonia will strip the zinc
rapidly, nor ally, but best not to go out for a pint while the rims soak in a
tub....


Thomas Prufer
  #14   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Tue, 16 May 2006 09:20:35 +0200, Thomas Prufer
wrote:

On Tue, 16 May 2006 06:30:08 GMT, T i m wrote:

Ok, I'll have a look today .. just out of interest .. any idea what
it does to the ally itself?


Wiki says "Solutions of ammonium hydroxide can also dissolve reactive metals
such as aluminum and zinc, with the liberation of hydrogen gas."


Ah ;-(

A professional painter in a German diy group says to etch zinc with ammonia
before painting, so I don't think dilute household ammonia will strip the zinc
rapidly, nor ally, but best not to go out for a pint while the rims soak in a
tub....


I think you are right Thomas!

Thanks again .. and with that I think I'll just use 'elbow grease' ...
it's better for the environment anyway .. ;-)

All the best ..

T i m
  #15   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.motorcycles.classic
Chris Bacon
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

T i m wrote:
Chris Bacon wrote:
T i m wrote:
I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.

I removed the tyre today and I was right, loads of ally 'fur' in
there? ;-(

So my intention is to just clean the inside of the rims out (I'm doing
the rear as well although that tyre was tubed so not leaking), spray
them with some acid-etch primer and a few coats of car spray paint to
seal them up. Normally I would do a full refurb on such things (like
getting them bead blasted etc) but the bikes not worth it .. so as
long as I sort the corrosion out and it looks 'ok' when finished that
will do this time.

I was wondering if there was an easy_to_obtain_and_use chemical that
would remove this 'corrosion' (sulphate?) easily please? (like vinegar
on lime scale etc).

If not I'll just stick a medium wire brush in the electric drill?


If you could use a chemical means, it would leave a pitted
surface anyway.


Well from my experimental scrapings so far the surface under the
corrosion seems suprisingingly flat (I would of betted on 'well
pitted' looking at the amount of corrosion)?

I's be inclined to brush it off,


Failing a suitable 'chemical' solution g then brushing would be my
solution.

and use a tubed tyre, if you want "cheap".


Cheap isn't something I generally mix with tyres


You said "a full refurb ... is not worth it". There's nothing wrong
with using a tubed tyre on this machine (indeed you said in your OP
that you have a tube on the other wheel).


.. especially
motorcycle ones. The rear tyre is infact brand new (I've probably done
50 miles on it) but it's tubed and not the same brand / model as the
front (Pirelli) so I've ordered a matching tubeless Pirelli for the
rear. Apart from liking them to be the same


Why on earth? The design of the front is most likely to be completely
different to that of the rear. There's not necessarily any value in
having the front and rear of the same brand.


I like to use Ultraseal
(puncture preventer not 'get_you_home' stuff) and that works best in
tubeless tyres.


That's not a very good idea according to some, there are safety issues.


My old Rover was given to me with 'Happy Shopper' (or similar) brand
tyres fitted .. they were lethal .. swapped them for a set of Avons
(at nearly twice the cost of the car) .. much better ;-)

You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.


Ok I'll have a look. Were there many classic bikes with cast alloy
wheels Chris?


Of course.


  #16   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Chris Bacon
 
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Default De-furring aluminium ..?

raden wrote:
Chris Bacon writes
You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.


It depends how you approach them

You've obviously discovered that they don't suffer fools gladly


Got one!

I used to use u.r.m. quite a lot, it was great! I haven't posted
there for years. I heard that many ****s post there nowadays.

You post there, don't you.
  #17   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Rob Morley
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In article
T i m wrote:
On Tue, 16 May 2006 09:20:35 +0200, Thomas Prufer
wrote:

On Tue, 16 May 2006 06:30:08 GMT, T i m wrote:

Ok, I'll have a look today .. just out of interest .. any idea what
it does to the ally itself?


Wiki says "Solutions of ammonium hydroxide can also dissolve reactive metals
such as aluminum and zinc, with the liberation of hydrogen gas."


Ah ;-(

A professional painter in a German diy group says to etch zinc with ammonia
before painting, so I don't think dilute household ammonia will strip the zinc
rapidly, nor ally, but best not to go out for a pint while the rims soak in a
tub....


I think you are right Thomas!

Thanks again .. and with that I think I'll just use 'elbow grease' ...
it's better for the environment anyway .. ;-)

For the back wheel you could just refit it (minus tyre) and let the
engine turn it while you hold a bit of emery paper against it. But
don't get wrapped around the axle.

  #18   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Chris Bacon
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

Rob Morley wrote:
T i m wrote:
Thanks again .. and with that I think I'll just use 'elbow grease' ...
it's better for the environment anyway .. ;-)

For the back wheel you could just refit it (minus tyre) and let the
engine turn it while you hold a bit of emery paper against it. But
don't get wrapped around the axle.


Lots of accidents happen when people do this sort of
thing.. fingers trapped between chain and sprocket,
and all sorts. A wheel, spinning, stores quite a lot
of energy.
  #19   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Rob Morley
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In article
Chris Bacon wrote:
Rob Morley wrote:
T i m wrote:
Thanks again .. and with that I think I'll just use 'elbow grease' ...
it's better for the environment anyway .. ;-)

For the back wheel you could just refit it (minus tyre) and let the
engine turn it while you hold a bit of emery paper against it. But
don't get wrapped around the axle.


Lots of accidents happen when people do this sort of
thing.. fingers trapped between chain and sprocket,
and all sorts. A wheel, spinning, stores quite a lot
of energy.

I caught my finger between chain and sprocket on a push bike once - it
was not a pleasant experience. As is so often the case recently my
suggestion was potentially dangerous, I shouldn't encourage others to
take silly risks, I'll try not to do it again ...
  #20   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Chris Bacon
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

Rob Morley wrote:
I caught my finger between chain and sprocket on a push bike once - it
was not a pleasant experience. As is so often the case recently my
suggestion was potentially dangerous, I shouldn't encourage others to
take silly risks, I'll try not to do it again ...


Ow, bad luck... (I wasn't trying to berate you, you know).


  #21   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.motorcycles.classic
raden
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In message , Chris Bacon
writes
I like to use Ultraseal
(puncture preventer not 'get_you_home' stuff) and that works best in
tubeless tyres.


That's not a very good idea according to some, there are safety issues.


Safety issues ?

If I had a puncture at speed on my bike, I would much rather have
ultraseal in the tyre than not


--
geoff
  #22   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
raden
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In message , Chris Bacon
writes
raden wrote:
Chris Bacon writes
You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.

It depends how you approach them
You've obviously discovered that they don't suffer fools gladly


Got one!

I used to use u.r.m. quite a lot, it was great! I haven't posted
there for years. I heard that many ****s post there nowadays.

You post there, don't you.


I do, but the TQ is much lower than it was a few years ago, isn't it
Dave

--
geoff
  #23   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
raden
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In message , T i m
writes
On Mon, 15 May 2006 23:07:16 GMT, raden wrote:

In message , T i m
writes
I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.
You need some
http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html
that's what you need
some
http://www.ultrasealuk.biz/flashintro.html
although you could probably do without the intro

Funny you should mention that as I was repling to Chris!

I'm not sure how well Ultraseal would work sealing a rim leak though
Geoff? I did once use 'Tyre weld' to cure a similar leak on my
Electric car as it had 4 wheels, didn't go very fast and wasn't ever
likely to wear them out (so wouldn't need to get them off). It worked
very well.

It works

I've always had a slow leak on my GS750, which could only be down to a
scabby rim - gobbed a bit of ultraseal in and I haven't even had to fart
in it's general direction


Hmmm, well that's interesting (I did nearly did as you have done but
as I wanted to change the rear tyre so .... ).

The good news is I will be putting Ultrasal in there anyway so if the
rims don't come up to scratch I know I'll be ok ;-)

Good stuff tho innit Geoff ;-)

'Kin dog's gonads

(whatever some **** says)

--
geoff
  #24   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
raden
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In message , Thomas Prufer
writes
On Mon, 15 May 2006 22:06:57 GMT, T i m wrote:

Ah, ok, where / how / what form do we buy that these days please?


Eh, dunno, being far from the UK... ("Ammonia" is correctly "aqueous
solution of
ammonia" or "ammonium hydroxide", so Wiki tells me, just in case you
end up at a
chemical supply house, where these differences matter.)

It's used for window cleaning, fuming oak, cleaning zinc before painting -- so
supermarket, diy wood/paints place, paint specialist might be the
places to try.

I bought some years ago direct from a pharmacist, prolly not so easy
nowadays

Someone posted the contact details of a chemical supplier a while ago,
prolly your best bet if needs to be strong

--
geoff
  #25   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On 16 May 2006 12:20:04 +0200, Chris Bacon
wrote:



Cheap isn't something I generally mix with tyres


You said "a full refurb ... is not worth it".


Indeed I did, but there are certain things I don't penny pinch on ..

There's nothing wrong
with using a tubed tyre on this machine (indeed you said in your OP
that you have a tube on the other wheel).


But that's not what is specified in the owners handbook (tubed tyres).


.. especially
motorcycle ones. The rear tyre is infact brand new (I've probably done
50 miles on it) but it's tubed and not the same brand / model as the
front (Pirelli) so I've ordered a matching tubeless Pirelli for the
rear. Apart from liking them to be the same


Why on earth? The design of the front is most likely to be completely
different to that of the rear. There's not necessarily any value in
having the front and rear of the same brand.


The 'design' (tread pattern etc) on most tyres I have ever come across
are very much the same on front and back, be it a scooter, tourer or
trail? The only exception that I can remember were the smaller stuff
(50, 70, 80, 90) that tended to have more of a ribbed tyre on the
front? I work that a good starting point for any vehicle is to have a
matching set of tyres to start with and go from there. Normally this
results in staying with a pair / set of what works the best. Like I
said, the front is tubless, Ultraseal works best with tubeless so I
want a matching tubeless on the rear shrug


I like to use Ultraseal
(puncture preventer not 'get_you_home' stuff) and that works best in
tubeless tyres.


That's not a very good idea according to some, there are safety issues.


And a flat tyre on the front at 70 mph 'isn't' a safety issue Chris? I
have seen too much real evidence (experience) for and very little
(real) evidence against ..



Ok I'll have a look. Were there many classic bikes with cast alloy
wheels Chris?


Of course.


Ok, thanks.

All the best ..

T i m





  #26   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Tue, 16 May 2006 19:04:25 GMT, raden wrote:

In message , Chris Bacon
writes
I like to use Ultraseal
(puncture preventer not 'get_you_home' stuff) and that works best in
tubeless tyres.


That's not a very good idea according to some, there are safety issues.


Safety issues ?

If I had a puncture at speed on my bike, I would much rather have
ultraseal in the tyre than not


I should have read all the replies first eh Geoff! ;-)

I have had direct communication with too many real riders of real
bikes that have had real 'punctures' where it has either completely
sealed the hole or slowed the leak sufficiently to allow them to come
to a halt under control. ;-)

All the best ..

T i m

  #27   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Tue, 16 May 2006 13:42:25 +0100, Rob Morley
wrote:


A professional painter in a German diy group says to etch zinc with ammonia
before painting, so I don't think dilute household ammonia will strip the zinc
rapidly, nor ally, but best not to go out for a pint while the rims soak in a
tub....


I think you are right Thomas!

Thanks again .. and with that I think I'll just use 'elbow grease' ...
it's better for the environment anyway .. ;-)

For the back wheel you could just refit it (minus tyre) and let the
engine turn it while you hold a bit of emery paper against it. But
don't get wrapped around the axle.


Hmmm ;-)

I did think of putting an 'axle' in the workmate and letting the
spinning wire brush in the drill to spin the wheel and slow it with my
leg etc ..?

Either that or just holding it in the workmate conventionally and
doing it in sectors. It's one of those jobs that I find quite
rewarding as a d-i-yer .. starting with a corroded mess and
(hopefully) ending up with a long lasting well finished product. ;-)

The the MZ that got caught up in a shop fire and a couple of weeks
later looked like new. My mate is still riding it 20k miles later ;-)

All the best ..

T i m





  #28   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Tue, 16 May 2006 18:07:09 +0100, Grimly Curmudgeon
wrote:


I like to use Ultraseal
(puncture preventer not 'get_you_home' stuff) and that works best in
tubeless tyres.


That's not a very good idea according to some, there are safety issues.


Only if the owner is clueless enough to never check his tyres for
evidence of the sealer working on a hole - that's why it's bright green
or similar.


I'm not quite sure what that would achieve other than knowing you
*had* a punture within 100 miles or so and it fixed it (outside of
general regular tyre checks of course)?

You tend to get bull**** spouted from tyrefitters too, about
safety, but it's more to do with the admittedly slight extra hassle of
cleaning the rim.


Ultraseal is water soluble so not mush hassle to remove (but you can
actually put the tyre on a new rim and leave the stuff in the tyre
(apparently).


Ok I'll have a look. Were there many classic bikes with cast alloy
wheels Chris?


Of course.


Plenty, unless the OP is of the opinion that only ****eOldBritters are
Classics.


Indeed I don't .. I suppose I was thinking more along the lines of how
many 'classics' (not that *none* did) had cast wheels (I think cast
ally is slightly 'different' to spun / rolled / pressed ally)? I
believe most *older* bikes had chromed steel rims or ally rims (again
with steel spokes)?

But then I've nevery really been into 'classic' unless I happened is
one as *transport* .. like my Messerschmitt .. ;-)

All the best ..

T i m



  #29   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.motorcycles.classic
Chris Bacon
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

raden wrote:
Chris Bacon writes
someone wrote:
I like to use Ultraseal
(puncture preventer not 'get_you_home' stuff) and that works best in
tubeless tyres.


That's not a very good idea according to some, there are safety issues.


Safety issues ?

If I had a puncture at speed on my bike, I would much rather have
ultraseal in the tyre than not


As Mr. G.C. (ISTR) says, there are those who find out they should
have done a bit more checking... after they've come to grief.
  #30   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Chris Bacon
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

raden wrote:
Chris Bacon writes
raden wrote:
Chris Bacon writes
You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.

It depends how you approach them
You've obviously discovered that they don't suffer fools gladly


I used to use u.r.m. quite a lot, it was great! I haven't posted
there for years. I heard that many ****s post there nowadays.


I do, but the TQ is much lower than it was a few years ago, isn't it Dave


I should hope it is.... the only Dave that IR at all is one whose
surname begins with S. I'm sure there are lots more Daves - or are
they in an outhouse... time goes by.


  #31   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Chris Bacon
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

T i m wrote:
Chris Bacon wrote:
Cheap isn't something I generally mix with tyres


You said "a full refurb ... is not worth it".


Indeed I did, but there are certain things I don't penny pinch on ..

There's nothing wrong
with using a tubed tyre on this machine (indeed you said in your OP
that you have a tube on the other wheel).


But that's not what is specified in the owners handbook (tubed tyres).


You've already said you have a tubed tyre. There's no problem with
tubed tyres on that thing. I don't know why you've apparently a chip
on your shoulder - I assume it's my fault, again. Anyway, in lieu of
apologies, I put it to you that if you aren't penny pinching on this,
your best recourse is to have the wheel re-built with NOS wheels and
brand-new matching fronts & rear covers, and make sure any work is
done by a five-star rated establishment with gold-plating facilities.



















or if it's really needed.
  #32   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
raden
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

In message , Chris Bacon
writes
raden wrote:
Chris Bacon writes
raden wrote:
Chris Bacon writes
You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.

It depends how you approach them
You've obviously discovered that they don't suffer fools gladly


I used to use u.r.m. quite a lot, it was great! I haven't posted
there for years. I heard that many ****s post there nowadays.

I do, but the TQ is much lower than it was a few years ago, isn't it
Dave


I should hope it is.... the only Dave that IR at all is one whose
surname begins with S. I'm sure there are lots more Daves - or are
they in an outhouse... time goes by.


Do we get a fiver for the first correct answer ?

--
geoff
  #33   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On 16 May 2006 23:29:53 +0200, Chris Bacon
wrote:

raden wrote:
Chris Bacon writes
someone wrote:
I like to use Ultraseal
(puncture preventer not 'get_you_home' stuff) and that works best in
tubeless tyres.

That's not a very good idea according to some, there are safety issues.


Safety issues ?

If I had a puncture at speed on my bike, I would much rather have
ultraseal in the tyre than not


As Mr. G.C. (ISTR) says, there are those who find out they should
have done a bit more checking... after they've come to grief.


Not sure what you are trying to endorse here Chris?

You check your tubeless tyres before a journey and they are fine.

Whilst on yer journey you ride over a sharp object and gain a
puncture.

Without Ultraseal your tyre rapidly deflates and if you feel it before
it's too late and can get to safety before you get
chucked_down_the_road you are indeed a lucky man

or

With Ultraseal you carry on your journey oblivious of anything being
different (because there isn't)

What have I forgotten to check?

All the best ..

T i m



  #34   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On 16 May 2006 23:48:57 +0200, Chris Bacon
wrote:

T i m wrote:
Chris Bacon wrote:
Cheap isn't something I generally mix with tyres

You said "a full refurb ... is not worth it".


Indeed I did, but there are certain things I don't penny pinch on ..

There's nothing wrong
with using a tubed tyre on this machine (indeed you said in your OP
that you have a tube on the other wheel).


But that's not what is specified in the owners handbook (tubed tyres).


You've already said you have a tubed tyre. There's no problem with
tubed tyres on that thing.


Ok, I wan't sure if I should of replied to you the first time (I
though we had an agreement that you didn't reply to any of my posts?)
now I'm even more sure ...

I want tubeless tyres on 'that thing' because whatever bike it is, if
I'm sitting on it I'd like to know that I have the best chance
possible should summat go wrong. Now I can't do much about Volvos but
I can choose the best tyres (make , pattern, type) for my machine and
that means tubeless because

1) That's what I believe it was designed for (rim profile etc)
2) Ultraseal works best in tubeless tyres. Ok?

I don't know why you've apparently a chip
on your shoulder -


About what?

I assume it's my fault, again.


Well you certianly aren't answering my queston on removing sulphate
now are you?

Anyway, in lieu of
apologies,


None needed?

I put it to you that if you aren't penny pinching on this,
your best recourse is to have the wheel re-built with NOS wheels and
brand-new matching fronts & rear covers, and make sure any work is
done by a five-star rated establishment with gold-plating facilities.


Close. New rear cover (front ok), re-rurbished inner rims (at least)
plus probably 'quick spray over' on the outside and by a 5* place
(me).

And gold has little place in my world (other than for electrical
connectors afaik).




or if it's really needed.


Not sure it's enough Chris but thanks for trying .... ;-)

All the best ..

T i m


  #35   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
The Natural Philosopher
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

Chris Bacon wrote:
T i m wrote:
I decided to do something about the slow 'puncture' on the front wheel
of my little runabout motorbike (Honda CB 'Two Fifty') that I was
pretty confident was caused by corrosion / flakey paint between the
(tubeless) tyre and ally rim.

I removed the tyre today and I was right, loads of ally 'fur' in
there? ;-(

So my intention is to just clean the inside of the rims out (I'm doing
the rear as well although that tyre was tubed so not leaking), spray
them with some acid-etch primer and a few coats of car spray paint to
seal them up. Normally I would do a full refurb on such things (like
getting them bead blasted etc) but the bikes not worth it .. so as
long as I sort the corrosion out and it looks 'ok' when finished that
will do this time.

I was wondering if there was an easy_to_obtain_and_use chemical that
would remove this 'corrosion' (sulphate?) easily please? (like vinegar
on lime scale etc).

If not I'll just stick a medium wire brush in the electric drill?


If you could use a chemical means, it would leave a pitted
surface anyway. I's be inclined to brush it off, and use a
tubed tyre, if you want "cheap". You could try u.r.m.classic,
or u.r.m., although you're unlikely to get a reasonable
answer fron the latter.


Agreed, or simply take the tyre off, mount the bike on stands, get some
emery cloth and let the wheel rev and use it as a sort of lathe... Oh it
is the front wheel.

You will have to get someone else to spin it.


  #36   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On Wed, 17 May 2006 02:22:42 +0100, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:


If you could use a chemical means, it would leave a pitted
surface anyway. I's be inclined to brush it off,


Agreed, or simply take the tyre off, mount the bike on stands, get some
emery cloth and let the wheel rev and use it as a sort of lathe... Oh it
is the front wheel.

You will have to get someone else to spin it.


lol

What would be *ideal* would be something like a very slow lathe (/
lathe geared right down).

'Spinning' 16 or 18" diameter of cast ally fast whist trying to wire
brush it wouldn't be very easy / nice (this corrosion must be 1mm deep
/ thoick in places). I think turning it the speed of a tyre removal
machine would still be too fast to be able to focus on the worst bits?

Once cleaned of corrosion a slightly faster spin with some wet-n-dry
to give it a nice smoothe finish would be nice ;-)

All the best ..

T i m



  #37   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Guy King
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

The message
from T i m contains these words:

Without Ultraseal your tyre rapidly deflates and if you feel it before
it's too late and can get to safety before you get
chucked_down_the_road you are indeed a lucky man


A puncture big enough to deflate so rapidly that you can't get to the
hard shoulder is in my experience too large for tyre sealants to deal
with.

--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  #38   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Chris Bacon
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

T i m wrote:
Chris Bacon wrote:
[ snip all ]

Ok, I wan't sure if I should of replied to you the first time (I
though we had an agreement that you didn't reply to any of my posts?)
now I'm even more sure ...


Look, I don't know why you think "we had an agreement that you
didn't reply to any of my posts?" (as if). I've haven't "got it
in for you" or anything like that. Try looking at these posts
from another angle. I can't help you more than that.
  #39   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Chris Bacon
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

T i m wrote:
'Spinning' 16 or 18" diameter of cast ally fast whist trying to wire
brush it wouldn't be very easy / nice (this corrosion must be 1mm deep
/ thoick in places). I think turning it the speed of a tyre removal
machine would still be too fast to be able to focus on the worst bits?


If you support the wheel on the axle (or even leave it on
the bike) you can use a wire brush in an electric drill,
which will turn the wheel. Slow the bike wheel with your
shoe or knee.
  #40   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
T i m
 
Posts: n/a
Default De-furring aluminium ..?

On 17 May 2006 10:42:57 +0200, Chris Bacon
wrote:

T i m wrote:
'Spinning' 16 or 18" diameter of cast ally fast whist trying to wire
brush it wouldn't be very easy / nice (this corrosion must be 1mm deep
/ thoick in places). I think turning it the speed of a tyre removal
machine would still be too fast to be able to focus on the worst bits?


If you support the wheel on the axle (or even leave it on
the bike) you can use a wire brush in an electric drill,
which will turn the wheel. Slow the bike wheel with your
shoe or knee.


Could do .. but for what it's probably gonna take to do the job a few
rotations of it held in the workmate will probably have to do (and be
easier to control / apply effort etc).

All the best ..

T i m

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