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Old December 23rd 05, 11:24 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
The3rd Earl Of Derby
 
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Default Restoring oak.

Stuart Noble wrote:
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:
For thr intricate Nitromors and a dremel drill or similiar, using
the brass conical bit, this is so fine and soft it won't gouge the
wood, put drill on slowest speed.
Providing you have a dremel that is?



Oh and if you haven't a dremel a "brass suede shoe brush" is your
best bet.

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite



The *only* way to make a good job of panelling is is to have it
dipped, preferably by the non-caustic method. Dip 'n Strip used to
have franchises dotted about.


Thats the way to go but if its the 1930's? paneling in this situ then it
would be a bugger to to take orf with a lot of making good putting back on.

--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite



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Old December 23rd 05, 11:48 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
Dave Plowman (News)
 
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Default Restoring oak.

In article ,
The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:
The *only* way to make a good job of panelling is is to have it
dipped, preferably by the non-caustic method. Dip 'n Strip used to
have franchises dotted about.


Thats the way to go but if its the 1930's? paneling in this situ then it
would be a bugger to to take orf with a lot of making good putting back
on.


It certainly would.

--
*When I'm not in my right mind, my left mind gets pretty crowded *

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
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Old December 23rd 05, 01:36 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Dingley
 
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Default Restoring oak.

On 22 Dec 2005 18:42:18 -0800, "Buzby" wrote:

Andy reminded me: How come when I repeatedly mention how I'd love a big
Skarsten scraper for Christmas no-one in my family ever takes the hint?


Skarsten don't do big scrapers. Sandvik do _big_ scrapers.

Friend of mine has a panelled room (sloped ceilings too) in a building
which was allegedly built as a dairy. But it's either a Welsh
priest-hole or else it was built by someone who normally did Chapels
(and very finely he built it too). Now scraping the flat surfaces of
that really was hard going - tried everything on it he did. In the end
he got very attached to one particular top-end model of Sandvik scraper.
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Old December 23rd 05, 01:50 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
The Natural Philosopher
 
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Default Restoring oak.

On Fri, 23 Dec 2005 00:48:01 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

A new neighbour wishes to restore the oak panelling in his hall - the
house was once owned by a coffin maker. ;-)

When I first saw it many years ago it was stained very dark - near black.
The next owner painted it white.

The present one wants it back to natural, but even after sanding there are
traces of the original stain - and the intricate mouldings make sanding
difficult without damage. Any tips?


Sandblasting is the only hope. In situ.

Not that expenisve - a few hundred only - use calcium carbonate for wood.
Helluva mess afterwards. Strip area of EVERYTHING and expect to hoover ten
times or so.

See yellow pages


If dismantled, caustic may work.

After blasting, it will be grain etched. Sanding will help for a newish
look, or leave it etched for Ye Olde Worlde look.


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Old December 23rd 05, 01:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
The Natural Philosopher
 
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Default Restoring oak.

On Fri, 23 Dec 2005 06:43:33 GMT, Stephen Dawson wrote:

"Andy Dingley" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 23 Dec 2005 00:48:01 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"
wrote:

The present one wants it back to natural,


He'll be lucky.

but even after sanding there are
traces of the original stain - and the intricate mouldings make sanding
difficult without damage. Any tips?


Same as any complicated stripping job - you probably have to use a
number of methods in sequence. Try one of the "blanket" strippers if
it's mouldings - something like the usual Nitromors recipe of methanol
and dichloromethane, thickened with cellulose and laid on under a layer
of thick polyethylene. Some of this depends on the stain - pigment
stains will lift off the surface but not out of the pores, dye stains
will be near impossible to shift from oak.

Sandvik also do some nice long-handled scrapers with carbide blades and
a ball handle to apply pressure with,

As a final measure, try oxalic acid bleach to lighten aged oak.


It will be messy but you could also get it sand blasted. One of my customers
is having this done to oak beams.


I had it done on some new ones after stupid builder painted thick varnish
on them..

Came out well, but heavily grained. No trace of varnish left anywhere.
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