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Old June 2nd 05, 12:24 AM
Adrian
 
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Default Recycled Railway Sleepers

All,

We're about to start on doing some major work to the back garden, including
replacing a retaining wall (about 500mm). We were planning on using
recycled railway sleepers for this, laid horizontally.

We knew there were certain caveats on these - something to do with the
preservatives that had been used causing anybody that goes within a mile of
'em to grow three heads or something - but we're finding some of the people
quoting are more than a bit reluctant.

We've heard that they're just plain illegal and unobtainable.

Then we've heard that they're illegal anywhere near where you may be
growing food. We probably won't be, but there's a possibility there'll be a
few veggies or more likely herbs in a bed bordered with them.

Now we've heard they're really not all that suitable, and likely to warp
and not hold well.

Thoughts? Is it just that they don't much like the idea of lugging the
bloody things through the house to the back garden but don't want to say
so?

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Old June 2nd 05, 02:06 AM
raden
 
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Default

In message . 170,
Adrian writes
All,

We're about to start on doing some major work to the back garden, including
replacing a retaining wall (about 500mm). We were planning on using
recycled railway sleepers for this, laid horizontally.

We knew there were certain caveats on these - something to do with the
preservatives that had been used causing anybody that goes within a mile of
'em to grow three heads or something - but we're finding some of the people
quoting are more than a bit reluctant.

We've heard that they're just plain illegal and unobtainable.

Then we've heard that they're illegal anywhere near where you may be
growing food. We probably won't be, but there's a possibility there'll be a
few veggies or more likely herbs in a bed bordered with them.

Now we've heard they're really not all that suitable, and likely to warp
and not hold well.

Thoughts? Is it just that they don't much like the idea of lugging the
bloody things through the house to the back garden but don't want to say
so?


Just think of how many people have ****ed on them over the years


--
geoff
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Old June 2nd 05, 04:24 AM
EricP
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 02 Jun 2005 00:06:37 GMT, raden babbled
like a waterfall and said:

In message . 170,
Adrian writes
All,

We're about to start on doing some major work to the back garden, including
replacing a retaining wall (about 500mm). We were planning on using
recycled railway sleepers for this, laid horizontally.

We knew there were certain caveats on these - something to do with the
preservatives that had been used causing anybody that goes within a mile of
'em to grow three heads or something - but we're finding some of the people
quoting are more than a bit reluctant.

We've heard that they're just plain illegal and unobtainable.

Then we've heard that they're illegal anywhere near where you may be
growing food. We probably won't be, but there's a possibility there'll be a
few veggies or more likely herbs in a bed bordered with them.

Now we've heard they're really not all that suitable, and likely to warp
and not hold well.

Thoughts? Is it just that they don't much like the idea of lugging the
bloody things through the house to the back garden but don't want to say
so?


Just think of how many people have ****ed on them over the years


That's rubbish!

The **** makes em waterproof so the **** won't soak in.

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Old June 2nd 05, 04:49 AM
BigWallop
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Adrian" wrote in message
. 244.170...
All,

We're about to start on doing some major work to the back garden,

including
replacing a retaining wall (about 500mm). We were planning on using
recycled railway sleepers for this, laid horizontally.

We knew there were certain caveats on these - something to do with the
preservatives that had been used causing anybody that goes within a mile

of
'em to grow three heads or something - but we're finding some of the

people
quoting are more than a bit reluctant.

We've heard that they're just plain illegal and unobtainable.

Then we've heard that they're illegal anywhere near where you may be
growing food. We probably won't be, but there's a possibility there'll be

a
few veggies or more likely herbs in a bed bordered with them.

Now we've heard they're really not all that suitable, and likely to warp
and not hold well.

Thoughts? Is it just that they don't much like the idea of lugging the
bloody things through the house to the back garden but don't want to say
so?

Old recycled sleepers are not really suitable for a garden where people are
sitting on them, or making use of them as flower bed borders and veggie bed
borders (if that's what you'd call them), because they were pressure treated
and embedded with very strong chemical preservatives. These chemicals were
known to cause skin irritation and sometimes cancers. They would also leak
these chemicals into the surrounding soil and kill off the plants that were
grown there. But that was the old recycled sleepers which I think are now
illegal to sell to the general public for all those very reasons.

New sleepers are obtainable though, and these have not been given the strong
treatment that the older ones got. These can be used quite safely for
around the house uses. So you can have the newer ones without worries.

This site tells some more tales on them:
http://www.rdgservices.com/newsleepers.html


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Old June 2nd 05, 08:38 AM
Alan J. Wylie
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 01 Jun 2005 22:24:12 GMT, Adrian said:

All, We're about to start on doing some major work to the back
garden, including replacing a retaining wall (about 500mm). We were
planning on using recycled railway sleepers for this, laid
horizontally.


We knew there were certain caveats on these - something to do with
the preservatives that had been used causing anybody that goes
within a mile of 'em to grow three heads or something - but we're
finding some of the people quoting are more than a bit reluctant.


http://railwaysleepers.net/

Given the comments about toxic preservatives in other replies to this
question, does anyone have any comments on the furniture at
http://www.jarabosky.co.uk/ ?

Are sleepers imported from tropical countries made from high quality
hardwoods, and treated with nothing more unpleasant that creosote?

--
Alan J. Wylie http://www.wylie.me.uk/
"Perfection [in design] is achieved not when there is nothing left to add,
but rather when there is nothing left to take away."
-- Antoine de Saint-Exupery


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Old June 2nd 05, 10:23 AM
Rick
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 01 Jun 2005 22:24:12 GMT, Adrian wrote:

All,

We're about to start on doing some major work to the back garden, including
replacing a retaining wall (about 500mm). We were planning on using
recycled railway sleepers for this, laid horizontally.

We knew there were certain caveats on these - something to do with the
preservatives that had been used causing anybody that goes within a mile of
'em to grow three heads or something - but we're finding some of the people
quoting are more than a bit reluctant.

We've heard that they're just plain illegal and unobtainable.

Then we've heard that they're illegal anywhere near where you may be
growing food. We probably won't be, but there's a possibility there'll be a
few veggies or more likely herbs in a bed bordered with them.

Now we've heard they're really not all that suitable, and likely to warp
and not hold well.

Thoughts? Is it just that they don't much like the idea of lugging the
bloody things through the house to the back garden but don't want to say
so?


I have used railway sleepers ....

They can be joined by drilling 10mm holes throught them, and then
hammeriing in 10mm rebar - this is hard work.

They stink - especially if cut, I ended up putting decking on mine to
make seats and the like.

You can still buy them, they are about 20 quid each

I'd use bricks for this application

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Old June 2nd 05, 12:28 PM
Andy Dingley
 
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Default

On Thu, 02 Jun 2005 07:38:34 +0100, (Alan J. Wylie)
wrote:

Given the comments about toxic preservatives in other replies to this
question, does anyone have any comments on the furniture at
http://www.jarabosky.co.uk/ ?

It's plug ugly, made from nasty wood ?

I admit I've made some of this stuff myself, but I don't _like_ this
"timber brutalist" styling - even as bar fitting or lofts. We're so
divorced from decent timber these days that we've forgotten what good
furniture looks like. A bit of plasticy veneer from Ikea passes as
"wood" and the horror that is "naughty pine" gets passed off as an
antique. Then we see recycled outdoor timbers pretending to be quality
cabinetry, sealed under a layer of sprayed lacquer to keep the smell and
the oils in. I make _timber_framing_ that's more like cabinetry than
this stuff. Get yourself to bath, or somewhere else with decent
galleries full of 18th century work, and take a look at real
craftsmanship in the best of materials.

(and yes, I've looked _very_ closely at Jarabosky's work in Camden)


Are sleepers imported from tropical countries made from high quality
hardwoods,


As a general rule, UK sleepers are Australian Jarrah and were creosoted.
Some are Rhodesian timbers. Anything older than that is probably
pre-Beeching and you aren't going to find them now.

treated with nothing more unpleasant that creosote?


Creosote is pretty unpleasant. I cycle past a BT pole depot and on a
good Summer's day I can start smelling it about 1/4 mile away.

--
Cats have nine lives, which is why they rarely post to Usenet.
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Old June 2nd 05, 01:14 PM
Mary Fisher
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Andy Dingley" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 02 Jun 2005 07:38:34 +0100, (Alan J. Wylie)
wrote:

Given the comments about toxic preservatives in other replies to this
question, does anyone have any comments on the furniture at
http://www.jarabosky.co.uk/ ?

It's plug ugly, made from nasty wood ?


Hear hear.

I admit I've made some of this stuff myself, but I don't _like_ this
"timber brutalist" styling - even as bar fitting or lofts.


It's certainly brutal. It's creeping into mediaeval events too :-(

We're so
divorced from decent timber these days that we've forgotten what good
furniture looks like. A bit of plasticy veneer from Ikea passes as
"wood" and the horror that is "naughty pine" gets passed off as an
antique. Then we see recycled outdoor timbers pretending to be quality
cabinetry, sealed under a layer of sprayed lacquer to keep the smell and
the oils in. I make _timber_framing_ that's more like cabinetry than
this stuff. Get yourself to bath, or somewhere else with decent
galleries full of 18th century work, and take a look at real
craftsmanship in the best of materials.


Well said.

Mary


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Old June 2nd 05, 02:23 PM
Andy Dingley
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 2 Jun 2005 12:14:59 +0100, "Mary Fisher"
wrote:

It's certainly brutal. It's creeping into mediaeval events too :-(


How do you think oak should be finished for re-enactor events ?
White, brown or black ? Personally I like my Stickley-style ammonia
fumed work (mid-brown) but I've also made "Jacobean" work that's as back
as I can get it. However both of these are anachronistic for "period"
repro - that's not the colour such timber would have been when it was
made.

Hollywood tends to disagree of course - "Shakespeare in Love" being one
of the worst offenders. I haven't seen "Team Templars vs. bin Laden"
yet
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Old June 2nd 05, 05:09 PM
[news]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

EricP wrote:
On Thu, 02 Jun 2005 00:06:37 GMT, raden babbled
like a waterfall and said:

In message . 170,
Adrian writes
All,

We're about to start on doing some major work to the back garden, including
replacing a retaining wall (about 500mm). We were planning on using
recycled railway sleepers for this, laid horizontally.

We knew there were certain caveats on these - something to do with the
preservatives that had been used causing anybody that goes within a mile of
'em to grow three heads or something - but we're finding some of the people
quoting are more than a bit reluctant.

We've heard that they're just plain illegal and unobtainable.

Then we've heard that they're illegal anywhere near where you may be
growing food. We probably won't be, but there's a possibility there'll be a
few veggies or more likely herbs in a bed bordered with them.

Now we've heard they're really not all that suitable, and likely to warp
and not hold well.

Thoughts? Is it just that they don't much like the idea of lugging the
bloody things through the house to the back garden but don't want to say
so?


Just think of how many people have ****ed on them over the years


That's rubbish!

The **** makes em waterproof so the **** won't soak in.


hahahah. too true




RT





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