Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old November 27th 04, 01:22 AM
Kenn E. Thompson
 
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Default Convert Degrees to Foot Pounds?

Working on a Deutz Diesel engine. The instructions say to torque the
bolts to 30 foot pounds then turn 45 degrees.

Can I convert the degrees to foot pounds so I can use a torque wrench
to make them more exact?

Is there an abbreviation for "foot pounds"?

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Old November 27th 04, 02:11 AM
Tom Gardner
 
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Do what it says. There are factors that affect torque readings. The
engineers have it right, no sense second guessing them.


"Kenn E. Thompson" wrote in message
om...
Working on a Deutz Diesel engine. The instructions say to torque the
bolts to 30 foot pounds then turn 45 degrees.

Can I convert the degrees to foot pounds so I can use a torque wrench
to make them more exact?

Is there an abbreviation for "foot pounds"?



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Old November 27th 04, 02:54 AM
DoN. Nichols
 
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Default

In article ,
Kenn E. Thompson wrote:
Working on a Deutz Diesel engine. The instructions say to torque the
bolts to 30 foot pounds then turn 45 degrees.

Can I convert the degrees to foot pounds so I can use a torque wrench
to make them more exact?


No -- that would be making them *less* exact.

Do you have an old school protractor? (The D-shaped thing with
angles marked on it in degrees.) Use your torque wrench as instructed
to tighten to 30 foot pounds, and then place the protractor to measure
the angle of the wrench handle. Turn it an extra 45 degrees (1/8 of a
full turn). This part is to stretch the bolt after you get it to that
torque starting point. And that bolt should *never* be re-used -- you
stretch it once, no more.

Is there an abbreviation for "foot pounds"?


"Ft-Lbs" is one.

Enjoy,
DoN.

--
Email: | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
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Old November 27th 04, 02:58 AM
Robert Swinney
 
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Yep. It is probably easier to turn 45 degrees and stop rather than to
"torque" to some specified final amount.

Bob Swinney
"Tom Gardner" wrote in message
news
Do what it says. There are factors that affect torque readings. The
engineers have it right, no sense second guessing them.


"Kenn E. Thompson" wrote in message
om...
Working on a Deutz Diesel engine. The instructions say to torque the
bolts to 30 foot pounds then turn 45 degrees.

Can I convert the degrees to foot pounds so I can use a torque wrench
to make them more exact?

Is there an abbreviation for "foot pounds"?





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Old November 27th 04, 06:57 AM
Leo Lichtman
 
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Default


"Tim Williams" wrote: 3 * 4 = 4 * 3. ;^)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's the reciprocity law, and it applies to addition and multiplication.
However, there is a HUGE difference when you are dealing with vectors. If
the vectors are colinear, you get WORK, and by convention it is labelled
foot-pounds. If the vectors are at right angles, you get TORQUE, and label
it pound-feet. The labelling is arbitrary, but important. :-)


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Old November 27th 04, 12:54 PM
ATP
 
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Default


"DoN. Nichols" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Kenn E. Thompson wrote:
Working on a Deutz Diesel engine. The instructions say to torque the
bolts to 30 foot pounds then turn 45 degrees.

Can I convert the degrees to foot pounds so I can use a torque wrench
to make them more exact?


No -- that would be making them *less* exact.

Do you have an old school protractor? (The D-shaped thing with
angles marked on it in degrees.) Use your torque wrench as instructed
to tighten to 30 foot pounds, and then place the protractor to measure
the angle of the wrench handle. Turn it an extra 45 degrees (1/8 of a
full turn). This part is to stretch the bolt after you get it to that
torque starting point. And that bolt should *never* be re-used -- you
stretch it once, no more.

Doesn't every bolt stretch when you torque it down? How are these
fundamentally different?


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Old November 27th 04, 01:34 PM
Jeff R.
 
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Default


"ATP" wrote in message
...

"DoN. Nichols" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Kenn E. Thompson wrote:
Working on a Deutz Diesel engine. The instructions say to torque the
bolts to 30 foot pounds then turn 45 degrees.

Can I convert the degrees to foot pounds so I can use a torque wrench
to make them more exact?


No -- that would be making them *less* exact.

Do you have an old school protractor? (The D-shaped thing with
angles marked on it in degrees.) Use your torque wrench as instructed
to tighten to 30 foot pounds, and then place the protractor to measure
the angle of the wrench handle. Turn it an extra 45 degrees (1/8 of a
full turn). This part is to stretch the bolt after you get it to that
torque starting point. And that bolt should *never* be re-used -- you
stretch it once, no more.

Doesn't every bolt stretch when you torque it down? How are these
fundamentally different?


Also...
Doesn't this assume that these bolts are tightened past their elastic limit?
Past their UTS?

Surely not...

==
Jeff R.


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Old November 27th 04, 01:37 PM
Jeff R.
 
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"Jeff R." wrote in message news:41a88252$0$17543

Doesn't this assume that these bolts are tightened past their elastic limit?
Past their UTS?


Brain fart.
I meant "Yield Stress"

(oops)




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