Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old February 9th 21, 12:45 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Get -40C in my fillet weld tensile break tests



"Jim Wilkins" wrote in message ...

"Gerry" wrote in message ...

In order to draw compressed air from the upper level of my inverted
propane cylinder storage tank; I bazed a half coupling into the inner
end of a reducing bushing (I don't have a welder) and inserted the
smaller pipe through a 3/4" "T" and nipple in the threaded boss. The
branch of the "T" serves as inlet and drain.

--------------------------

Something like this, in effect?
https://www.zoro.com/nibco-2-x-34-x-...x2/i/G1806664/

-------------------------------
I vaguely remember cobbling up a fitting that let compressed air into and
oil out of a tank that had only one opening, back before I had a lathe. I
may have tapped the small end from the inside and cut the two pipes running
into it short enough to not meet.
https://www.buyfittingsonline.com/pi...eable-iron-ul/


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Old February 10th 21, 05:39 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Get -40C in my fillet weld tensile break tests

On Tue, 9 Feb 2021 06:18:47 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Gerry" wrote in message ...

In order to draw compressed air from the upper level of my inverted
propane cylinder storage tank; I bazed a half coupling into the inner
end of a reducing bushing (I don't have a welder) and inserted the
smaller pipe through a 3/4" "T" and nipple in the threaded boss. The
branch of the "T" serves as inlet and drain.

--------------------------

Something like this, in effect?
https://www.zoro.com/nibco-2-x-34-x-...x2/i/G1806664/

Somewhat similar, but in iron fittings and with the smaller pipe
extending through the nipple into the tank.
  #33   Report Post  
Old February 10th 21, 05:55 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Get -40C in my fillet weld tensile break tests

On Tue, 9 Feb 2021 06:45:38 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:



"Jim Wilkins" wrote in message ...

"Gerry" wrote in message ...

In order to draw compressed air from the upper level of my inverted
propane cylinder storage tank; I bazed a half coupling into the inner
end of a reducing bushing (I don't have a welder) and inserted the
smaller pipe through a 3/4" "T" and nipple in the threaded boss. The
branch of the "T" serves as inlet and drain.

--------------------------

Something like this, in effect?
https://www.zoro.com/nibco-2-x-34-x-...x2/i/G1806664/

-------------------------------
I vaguely remember cobbling up a fitting that let compressed air into and
oil out of a tank that had only one opening, back before I had a lathe. I
may have tapped the small end from the inside and cut the two pipes running
into it short enough to not meet.
https://www.buyfittingsonline.com/pi...eable-iron-ul/

By brazing the half of a coupling into the inner end of the reducing
bushing, I, in effect turned it into a coupling for the smaller pipe
(1/4"IPS, IIRC) with threads on the outside to fit into the end of the
3/4" "T" giving a 3/4" close nipple screwed ito the boss of the tank
with a length of 1/4" pipe extending through it up into the tank.
  #34   Report Post  
Old February 10th 21, 02:51 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 5,825
Default Get -40C in my fillet weld tensile break tests

"Gerry" wrote in message ...

On Tue, 9 Feb 2021 06:45:38 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:



"Jim Wilkins" wrote in message ...

"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .

In order to draw compressed air from the upper level of my inverted
propane cylinder storage tank; I bazed a half coupling into the inner
end of a reducing bushing (I don't have a welder) and inserted the
smaller pipe through a 3/4" "T" and nipple in the threaded boss. The
branch of the "T" serves as inlet and drain.

--------------------------

Something like this, in effect?
https://www.zoro.com/nibco-2-x-34-x-...x2/i/G1806664/

-------------------------------
I vaguely remember cobbling up a fitting that let compressed air into and
oil out of a tank that had only one opening, back before I had a lathe. I
may have tapped the small end from the inside and cut the two pipes running
into it short enough to not meet.
https://www.buyfittingsonline.com/pi...eable-iron-ul/

By brazing the half of a coupling into the inner end of the reducing
bushing, I, in effect turned it into a coupling for the smaller pipe
(1/4"IPS, IIRC) with threads on the outside to fit into the end of the
3/4" "T" giving a 3/4" close nipple screwed ito the boss of the tank
with a length of 1/4" pipe extending through it up into the tank.

---------------------------------------

I think I get it now. You made the reducing bushing into a coupler for two
pieces of the smaller pipe by brazing a second female thread to the back
side. I had trouble describing my versions without pictures.

I think the easy way, IF you have a lathe, is to bore out a male threaded
fitting or plug larger than the pass-through pipe and solder or braze it
onto the pipe, then you can easily adjust the fit up of the pass-through
pipe before permanently attaching it. Water pipe ODs don't closely match
fractional drill bit sizes.

Instead of trying to chuck fittings directly I screw them onto a brass pipe
nipple or machined fitting whose threads run truer to their OD than steel
water pipe and cast fittings. The threads of machined steel hydraulic
fittings also run true and they can handle more torque than brass.

Another way is to drill out a compression fitting so the tube can pass
through. This has the advantage that copper tubing OD is the same as drill
bit sizes, 3/8", 1/2" etc, and lathe boring isn't necessary. I did this to
replace the thin spray dip tube of garden sprayers with larger copper
tubing, to attach a sink spray hose. I drilled out the tank fitting but used
a tapered reamer to open up the cap nut which is too small to survive a
twist drill bit, and sealed the connection with an O ring. They serve as
pre-positioned rapid-response brush fire extinguishers in summer and power
outage hot showers in winter, with the water heated on the wood stove, and a
handy rinse-off when working out beyond the reach of a garden hose.

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Old February 18th 21, 07:58 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 120
Default Get -40C in my fillet weld tensile break tests

On Wednesday, February 10, 2021 at 8:51:47 AM UTC-5, Jim Wilkins wrote:
"Gerry" wrote in message ...
On Tue, 9 Feb 2021 06:45:38 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:



"Jim Wilkins" wrote in message ...

"Gerry" wrote in message
...

In order to draw compressed air from the upper level of my inverted
propane cylinder storage tank; I bazed a half coupling into the inner
end of a reducing bushing (I don't have a welder) and inserted the
smaller pipe through a 3/4" "T" and nipple in the threaded boss. The
branch of the "T" serves as inlet and drain.

--------------------------

Something like this, in effect?
https://www.zoro.com/nibco-2-x-34-x-...x2/i/G1806664/

-------------------------------
I vaguely remember cobbling up a fitting that let compressed air into and
oil out of a tank that had only one opening, back before I had a lathe. I
may have tapped the small end from the inside and cut the two pipes running
into it short enough to not meet.
https://www.buyfittingsonline.com/pi...eable-iron-ul/

By brazing the half of a coupling into the inner end of the reducing
bushing, I, in effect turned it into a coupling for the smaller pipe
(1/4"IPS, IIRC) with threads on the outside to fit into the end of the
3/4" "T" giving a 3/4" close nipple screwed ito the boss of the tank
with a length of 1/4" pipe extending through it up into the tank.
---------------------------------------

I think I get it now. You made the reducing bushing into a coupler for two
pieces of the smaller pipe by brazing a second female thread to the back
side. I had trouble describing my versions without pictures.

I think the easy way, IF you have a lathe, is to bore out a male threaded
fitting or plug larger than the pass-through pipe and solder or braze it
onto the pipe, then you can easily adjust the fit up of the pass-through
pipe before permanently attaching it. Water pipe ODs don't closely match
fractional drill bit sizes.

Instead of trying to chuck fittings directly I screw them onto a brass pipe
nipple or machined fitting whose threads run truer to their OD than steel
water pipe and cast fittings. The threads of machined steel hydraulic
fittings also run true and they can handle more torque than brass.

Another way is to drill out a compression fitting so the tube can pass
through. This has the advantage that copper tubing OD is the same as drill
bit sizes, 3/8", 1/2" etc, and lathe boring isn't necessary. I did this to
replace the thin spray dip tube of garden sprayers with larger copper
tubing, to attach a sink spray hose.


Switching the spigot fittings? Dod gamn good idea.


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