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dan
 
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Default farm tractor shift pattern

I have a need to drive a john deere farm tractor at the boarding
stable that I keep my horse at. The only one who drove it left
suddenly after an argument with the owner. The tractor has two shift
levers going into the trans axle. I think one is like a four speed
auto giving four speeds, and the other gives forward and reverse plus
one or two other positions.

Are my finding correct so far, and what are the other positions?

Is there a lever to disconnect the PTO? there isn't anything hooked
up to it, but if possible I would like to not have it turning.

Do these things have any kind of parking brake? I figured out the
dual foot brakes OK.

I will get a model number when I go to the barn next, and will take a
pic of the controls.

Thanks.
--

Dan
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asdf
 
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dan wrote:

I have a need to drive a john deere farm tractor at the boarding
stable that I keep my horse at. The only one who drove it left
suddenly after an argument with the owner. The tractor has two shift
levers going into the trans axle. I think one is like a four speed
auto giving four speeds, and the other gives forward and reverse plus
one or two other positions.

Are my finding correct so far, and what are the other positions?

Is there a lever to disconnect the PTO? there isn't anything hooked
up to it, but if possible I would like to not have it turning.

Do these things have any kind of parking brake? I figured out the
dual foot brakes OK.

I will get a model number when I go to the barn next, and will take a
pic of the controls.

Thanks.


You're going to kill yourself.
  #4   Report Post  
Robert Galloway
 
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Driven a lot of JDs. Yours doesn't sound familiar. The model number
would help.

bob g.

dan wrote:
I have a need to drive a john deere farm tractor at the boarding
stable that I keep my horse at. The only one who drove it left
suddenly after an argument with the owner. The tractor has two shift
levers going into the trans axle. I think one is like a four speed
auto giving four speeds, and the other gives forward and reverse plus
one or two other positions.

Are my finding correct so far, and what are the other positions?

Is there a lever to disconnect the PTO? there isn't anything hooked
up to it, but if possible I would like to not have it turning.

Do these things have any kind of parking brake? I figured out the
dual foot brakes OK.

I will get a model number when I go to the barn next, and will take a
pic of the controls.

Thanks.


  #5   Report Post  
Kevin Beitz
 
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I would say the other shifter is for High low range only...


  #6   Report Post  
Karl Townsend
 
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Half the fun is just figuring out a new tractor. Get out in the middle of
the field and start playing with it.

Unless you have a shuttle transmission, the left lever is speed ranges L-H
or L-M-H, the right will have an H pattern for R-1-2-3 ( some have 4 also)
A shuttle transmission has a forward/reverse lever just under the steering
wheel on the left.

Most Johnny's have a catch lever somewhere on the brake linkage to hold the
brakes down for parking and another lever to lock both left/right brakes
together. My brand new JD5310N has its own parking brake lever just like a
car.

The PTO engage lever will come out just in front of the axle, normally on
the left side. I far as I remember all JDs of any recent vintage do not
require you to have the clutch down to engage the PTO. The old ones do - the
two cylinder Johnny poppers.

Spend time learning where to check oil and other fluid levels - bet that
unit ain't been maintained either.


Not many Johnny's I ain't rode - except the 200+ horse articulating type.

Karl



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Robert Galloway
 
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I guess I'm dating myself. I'm used to JDs with one brake on each side
of the operator's platform. Hard to link together. At least, the one
in my garage, a 620, works that way.

rhg

Karl Townsend wrote:
Half the fun is just figuring out a new tractor. Get out in the middle of
the field and start playing with it.

Unless you have a shuttle transmission, the left lever is speed ranges L-H
or L-M-H, the right will have an H pattern for R-1-2-3 ( some have 4 also)
A shuttle transmission has a forward/reverse lever just under the steering
wheel on the left.

Most Johnny's have a catch lever somewhere on the brake linkage to hold the
brakes down for parking and another lever to lock both left/right brakes
together. My brand new JD5310N has its own parking brake lever just like a
car.

The PTO engage lever will come out just in front of the axle, normally on
the left side. I far as I remember all JDs of any recent vintage do not
require you to have the clutch down to engage the PTO. The old ones do - the
two cylinder Johnny poppers.

Spend time learning where to check oil and other fluid levels - bet that
unit ain't been maintained either.


Not many Johnny's I ain't rode - except the 200+ horse articulating type.

Karl




  #8   Report Post  
geoff m
 
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You usually have forward gears (3 or 4) and reverse on one stick, and
then a selection of gear ratios on the other, so you can go at various
speeds forward and reverse. most tractors don't have any syncros, so
you have to stop to change gear.
Handbrakes vary - on our little Ford, you step on the foot brake and
pull up a small ring by the brake pedal.
3pt linkage is a selection of hand controls (on the right on the
Ford) by the rear wheel fender. Should be a PTO engage lever around
there somewhere.
Hand throttle on the dash. Some have a foot throttle as well.
Diesels will usually need glow plug starting, and pull a knob to
stop. Don't forget to turn off the ignition if it isn't automatic
otherwise the battery will go flat.
Geoff
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Gunluvver2
 
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Dan,
I only operated J-D's a few times because my Dad hated them. One thing I do
remember about the ones I operated is that when the transmission is worn they
have a tendency to jump into neutral when going down steep hills ( some of my
first gray hairs were acquired at 12 years old by that). Another thing to
remember: some tractors must be parked uphill or downhill, depending on whether
they are in reverse or a forward gear. Not all brands are that way and I can't
remember what kind of tractor it was that killed a neighbor because of that
peculiarity. Be careful.
DL


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@net.(reversed).mts
 
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dan wrote:
I have a need to drive a john deere farm tractor at the boarding
stable that I keep my horse at. The only one who drove it left
suddenly after an argument with the owner. The tractor has two shift
levers going into the trans axle. I think one is like a four speed
auto giving four speeds, and the other gives forward and reverse plus
one or two other positions.

Are my finding correct so far, and what are the other positions?

Is there a lever to disconnect the PTO? there isn't anything hooked
up to it, but if possible I would like to not have it turning.

Do these things have any kind of parking brake? I figured out the
dual foot brakes OK.

I will get a model number when I go to the barn next, and will take a
pic of the controls.

Thanks.

Okay, sounds like you have a 1830-2130 type JD. The two levers are
indeed range and gear levers.
The left lever is the range lever and at the top-left position it will
be park. That's why you don't have any parking brakes, you have a park
gear. Top-right position is low-range (gears 1-4). Bottom-left is high
range (gears 5-8). Bottom-right is reverse. The other lever is for the
gears. Top-left is 1 (or 5) bottom-left is 2 (or 6), bottom-right is 3
(or 7), and top-right is 4 (or 8). It's not arranged like any manual
transmission is a truck, it's in a U-shaped shift pattern.

It's been a long while since we traded off our 1830 on a 6300 but I
thinks that's correct. The Range positions might be interchanged.

Hope this helps.

Jason Marshall
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that Robert Galloway fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Sun, 22 Aug 2004 16:44:44 -0500:


Driven a lot of JDs. Yours doesn't sound familiar. The model number
would help.


model # 1830

I did figure it out with a little trial and error, and the duct tape
labels someone put on it.


The left lever has four positions in an H pattern.

forward HI, forward LO, reverse, and park. Yes park. It locks the
axal.

The right lever is like a four speed manual gearbox on a car, but
third and forth seem to be switched.

The PTO lever on the left of the seat doesn't seem to work like I
expected. It won't move forward and back like I would expect. It can
be pivoted out towards the wheel, but there is no detent to keep it in
position. It has a spring that pulls it back away from the wheel.

On the right side of the seat there is a lever for the hydraulic
connections. Those are capped off, so I haven't messed with it.

Also on the right there is a lever that I can only guess is the
raise/lower for the three point hitch. I haven't messed with that
either.

Thanks for every ones help.

Dan H.
--

Dan
  #13   Report Post  
dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that Kevin Beitz fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by 22 Aug 2004 17:04:36 -0700:

I would say the other shifter is for High low range only...


See my other reply.

One is PARK HI LO REV, and the other is 1 2 3 4 .
--

Dan
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that Karl Townsend fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Mon, 23 Aug 2004 01:06:19 GMT:

Half the fun is just figuring out a new tractor. Get out in the middle of
the field and start playing with it.


That's about what I did. Once I was sure of how to stop the engine, I
tried everything slowly.

Unless you have a shuttle transmission, the left lever is speed ranges L-H
or L-M-H, the right will have an H pattern for R-1-2-3 ( some have 4 also)
A shuttle transmission has a forward/reverse lever just under the steering
wheel on the left.


As it turns out one lever is PARK HI LO REV and the other is 1 2 3 4.

Most Johnny's have a catch lever somewhere on the brake linkage to hold the
brakes down for parking and another lever to lock both left/right brakes
together. My brand new JD5310N has its own parking brake lever just like a
car.


Most of the other tractors here have a separate hand break or the
thing that engages a ratchet on the foot brake. But I looked and
looked, and couldn't find any such thing on this one. JD #1830



The PTO engage lever will come out just in front of the axle, normally on
the left side. I far as I remember all JDs of any recent vintage do not
require you to have the clutch down to engage the PTO. The old ones do - the
two cylinder Johnny poppers.

Spend time learning where to check oil and other fluid levels - bet that
unit ain't been maintained either.


There is a guy that does the repairs for the place, I have a call in
to him to look over the thing and show us what to check and stuff.

Not many Johnny's I ain't rode - except the 200+ horse articulating type.

Karl



--

Dan
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that Robert Galloway fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Sun, 22 Aug 2004 20:30:56 -0500:

I guess I'm dating myself. I'm used to JDs with one brake on each side
of the operator's platform. Hard to link together. At least, the one
in my garage, a 620, works that way.


This one is a 1830, it does have duel pedals that has a bar that can
be swung into position to make them stay together.
--

Dan


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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that geoff m fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by 23 Aug 2004 02:34:26 -0500:

You usually have forward gears (3 or 4) and reverse on one stick, and
then a selection of gear ratios on the other, so you can go at various
speeds forward and reverse. most tractors don't have any syncros, so
you have to stop to change gear.


This one must be an oddball. On one lever it has 1 2 3 4, and on
the other one PARK HI LO REV.

The park position explains why I couldn't find the parking brake.
Handbrakes vary - on our little Ford, you step on the foot brake and
pull up a small ring by the brake pedal.


3pt linkage is a selection of hand controls (on the right on the
Ford) by the rear wheel fender. Should be a PTO engage lever around
there somewhere.


Hand throttle on the dash. Some have a foot throttle as well.

Yep, found the hand and foot throttles by tracing back the linkages
from the injector pump. Found the stop lever too.

Diesels will usually need glow plug starting, and pull a knob to
stop. Don't forget to turn off the ignition if it isn't automatic
otherwise the battery will go flat.


Thanks I didn't know that.


--

Dan
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that Tom fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Mon, 23 Aug 2004 12:50:57 GMT:

Depends on the model. I have a 4300 compact and there are two shift
levers on the left side of the seat. One is 3 spd in line and the
other is 4 speed "H" pattern giving you a 12 speed combination. There
is a forward/reverse lever on the dash. The PTO lever is on the right
side of the seat and the parking brake is on the left. Others will
have different arrangements - knowing the model number will make a
world of difference.


It's a 1830.

I did figure out the shift patterns.
Thanks
--

Dan
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that Gunluvver2 fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by 23 Aug 2004 14:40:31 GMT:

Dan,
I only operated J-D's a few times because my Dad hated them. One thing I do
remember about the ones I operated is that when the transmission is worn they
have a tendency to jump into neutral when going down steep hills ( some of my
first gray hairs were acquired at 12 years old by that). Another thing to
remember: some tractors must be parked uphill or downhill, depending on whether
they are in reverse or a forward gear. Not all brands are that way and I can't
remember what kind of tractor it was that killed a neighbor because of that
peculiarity. Be careful.
DL



Thanks. I did figure out the shift pattern( see my other posts).

I shouldn't need to park it on a hill, so I should be OK.

We are just using it to pull a flatbed trailer to get hay from the
shed up the lane. For the most part we don't need to even back up.
We just lug along at 1/3 throttle first gear, high range. Takes a
while, but it won't get stuck in the mud like the pickup will.

Come winter, we may get a roller to flatten out the dirt before it
freezes in the paddocks.
--

Dan
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that "
" fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Mon, 23 Aug 2004 12:18:27 -0500:


Okay, sounds like you have a 1830-2130 type JD. The two levers are
indeed range and gear levers.
The left lever is the range lever and at the top-left position it will
be park. That's why you don't have any parking brakes, you have a park
gear. Top-right position is low-range (gears 1-4). Bottom-left is high
range (gears 5-8). Bottom-right is reverse. The other lever is for the
gears. Top-left is 1 (or 5) bottom-left is 2 (or 6), bottom-right is 3
(or 7), and top-right is 4 (or 8). It's not arranged like any manual
transmission is a truck, it's in a U-shaped shift pattern.


Yep that's it!! The factory labels are all long gone, but there is a
faded duct tape/marker label that had some of the positions still
showing.

It's been a long while since we traded off our 1830 on a 6300 but I
thinks that's correct. The Range positions might be interchanged.


Nope you got it right.

Hope this helps.


It does, Thanks!

--

Dan
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that "
" fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Mon, 23 Aug 2004 12:18:27 -0500:

It's been a long while since we traded off our 1830 on a 6300 but I
thinks that's correct.


Do you remember anything about the PTO lever? and the three point
hitch control?

--

Dan


  #21   Report Post  
jim rozen
 
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In article t, asdf says...

You're going to kill yourself.


From the replies to all the comments that have been
made to his questions, this sounds less than probable.
Seems like he has a pretty good approach to new
equipment.

Jim


--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
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@net.(reversed).mts
 
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dan wrote:
What's that Lassie? You say that "
" fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Mon, 23 Aug 2004 12:18:27 -0500:


It's been a long while since we traded off our 1830 on a 6300 but I
thinks that's correct.



Do you remember anything about the PTO lever? and the three point
hitch control?

I remember the PTO lever being topped with a yellow splined-looking
knob in between the two shift levers. Lifting it up (towards the front
of the tractor) engages the pto. When the tractor is not running it
won't stay in that position as it's a hydraulically-engaged wet-clutch.
Down is off but pushed down all the way is the pto brake position.
Useful for stopping the blades of a rotary mower and such. Usually the
detent goes south quickly so the lever just drops into the brake position.

The three-point hitch control will be right next to the hydraulic
control lever. It slides in a arc-shaped slot with a couple of
screw-nut stops to serve as depth-stops. Set them at the top and bottom
of your desired range and slide the lever between them. The lever
position should stay wherever you put it and the hitch arms should
mirror that position.

The two foot pedals on your right side are of course the brake pedals.
The bar over them is to lock them together for high-speed (for a
tractor) use. You don't want to mash only one brake at 18 mph on the
road in an emergency. Individual brakes are important in muddy or icy
conditions when your front tires don't have enough bit to turn the
tractor. Leave them uncoupled unless you really don't trust yourself to
put your foot in the middle of the two and press them both. Sometimes
one or the other brake circuit gets a little air in it and you don't get
even braking with them locked together. That's something to find out
before you need it.

I don't think there were glow-plugs on 1830's. They have a little
bathtub-faucet-looking thing under the dash with a silver cap on the
bottom. You unscrew the cap, take the top squirting thing off a can of
ether and push it up into the faucet for a second while you are cranking
it over. Usually the tiny line gets plugged where it enters the manifold
so that it won't start. Just locate the air intake behind one the
front-side grills and give it a shot in there.

Jason Marshall
Marshall Seed & Forage Co.
Manitoba, Canada
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that "
" fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Tue, 24 Aug 2004 10:04:18 -0500:


snip of good info


I don't think there were glow-plugs on 1830's. They have a little
bathtub-faucet-looking thing under the dash with a silver cap on the
bottom. You unscrew the cap, take the top squirting thing off a can of
ether and push it up into the faucet for a second while you are cranking
it over. Usually the tiny line gets plugged where it enters the manifold
so that it won't start. Just locate the air intake behind one the
front-side grills and give it a shot in there.


I thought that's what it might be for. But the cap is stuck on but
good. Hopefully I won't need to start it in the winter, but it does
have a block heater in it.

Thanks for all the good info. Very helpful.

Would you remember what the big cast lever on the left side of the
transmission, just forward of the left axil is for? Since its not the
PTO, I can't guess what it's for.

--

Dan
  #24   Report Post  
dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that jim rozen fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by 24 Aug 2004 07:13:10 -0700:

In article t, asdf says...

You're going to kill yourself.


From the replies to all the comments that have been
made to his questions, this sounds less than probable.
Seems like he has a pretty good approach to new
equipment.

Jim


Thanks for the vote of confidence Jim.

I do have a healthy respect for powered equipment.

My first real job for 12yrs. was in a warehouse driving all manor of
forklifts. That's where I learned how to estimate tight clearances.
The narrow isle trucks were about 50" wide, and the isles were about
110". That doesn't leave much when half of the isle has a 48" wide
pallet in it.
--

Dan
  #25   Report Post  
Robert Galloway
 
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Looking at an ad for the 1830, I see mention of a differential lock.
Got that found?

bob g.

dan wrote:

What's that Lassie? You say that "
" fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Tue, 24 Aug 2004 10:04:18 -0500:


snip of good info


I don't think there were glow-plugs on 1830's. They have a little
bathtub-faucet-looking thing under the dash with a silver cap on the
bottom. You unscrew the cap, take the top squirting thing off a can of
ether and push it up into the faucet for a second while you are cranking
it over. Usually the tiny line gets plugged where it enters the manifold
so that it won't start. Just locate the air intake behind one the
front-side grills and give it a shot in there.



I thought that's what it might be for. But the cap is stuck on but
good. Hopefully I won't need to start it in the winter, but it does
have a block heater in it.

Thanks for all the good info. Very helpful.

Would you remember what the big cast lever on the left side of the
transmission, just forward of the left axil is for? Since its not the
PTO, I can't guess what it's for.




  #26   Report Post  
@net.(reversed).mts
 
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dan wrote:
What's that Lassie? You say that "
" fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Tue, 24 Aug 2004 10:04:18 -0500:


snip of good info


I don't think there were glow-plugs on 1830's. They have a little
bathtub-faucet-looking thing under the dash with a silver cap on the
bottom. You unscrew the cap, take the top squirting thing off a can of
ether and push it up into the faucet for a second while you are cranking
it over. Usually the tiny line gets plugged where it enters the manifold
so that it won't start. Just locate the air intake behind one the
front-side grills and give it a shot in there.



I thought that's what it might be for. But the cap is stuck on but
good. Hopefully I won't need to start it in the winter, but it does
have a block heater in it.

Thanks for all the good info. Very helpful.

Would you remember what the big cast lever on the left side of the
transmission, just forward of the left axil is for? Since its not the
PTO, I can't guess what it's for.

That would be the differential lock. You can either grab the lever with
your hand and push it away from the seat or push down on the pedal with
your heel depending on which appendage happens to be free to operate a
control. It locks the differential in the rear end so both rear tires
turn together when you need the traction in muddy or icy conditions.

Jason Marshall

Marshall Seed & Forage Co.
Manitoba, Canada
  #27   Report Post  
dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that Robert Galloway fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Tue, 24 Aug 2004 19:57:24 -0500:

Looking at an ad for the 1830, I see mention of a differential lock.
Got that found?


Not that I know of. There is a small lever near the hitch raise/lower
lever that I don't know about.
--

Dan
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dan
 
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What's that Lassie? You say that "
" fell down the old
rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue
by Tue, 24 Aug 2004 20:34:51 -0500:

That would be the differential lock. You can either grab the lever with
your hand and push it away from the seat or push down on the pedal with
your heel depending on which appendage happens to be free to operate a
control. It locks the differential in the rear end so both rear tires
turn together when you need the traction in muddy or icy conditions.


Thanks, so far I have just used the independent brakes, but a dif.
lock would be better.
--

Dan
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Posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
col col is offline
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Posts: 1
Default farm tractor shift pattern

replying to , col wrote:
I have an 1830 also and you are correct


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for full context, visit https://www.polytechforum.com/metalw...rn-363397-.htm


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