Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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  #21   Report Post  
Old June 19th 20, 03:43 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default filing flats on a socket

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 10:59:15 -0400, Bob Engelhardt
wrote:

On 6/18/2020 10:50 AM, wws wrote:
I'm not smart enough to reinvent the wheel:

https://www.harborfreight.com/3-piec...aps-67011.html


That's one of those things that are so cool that I buy them and then
never use them. LOL

Somewhat like a finger ratchet?

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Old June 19th 20, 12:09 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default filing flats on a socket

"Clare Snyder" wrote in message
...


You got one of those 12 spline 20mm antiques?? Try a 3/4" AF coupling
nut drilled out to fit over the axle if necessary - I believe the
coupler nut for 1/2" allthread is 3/4" 20mm is .787 so it is about
..030" smaller but it might kust be big enough to grab 6 of the 12
splines and get it off.
================================================

The 1/2-13 all-thread coupler nuts I bought from a US hardware store measure
11/16", unlike the 3/4" nut standard.

An aluminum blank for the tool could be pounded into the freewheel to mark
the spline groove positions and then planed in the lathe to extend them with
a cutoff bit turned horizontal. I'd rough out the grooves first with the
Dremel and a metal-cutting saw instead of an abrasive, to protect the lathe.
http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Pr...heslotter.html

The handwheel carriage feed doesn't have much power to shave steel axially
so it's best left for 0.001" finishing cuts. Aluminum is much easier.

If the aluminum tool isn't strong enough as a wrench it could be mounted on
a mandrel beside a steel blank and used as a guide to copy.

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Old June 19th 20, 12:39 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default filing flats on a socket

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...

I'm guilty of the same practice. I shop at $1 Gewjaws R Us.


I was using a 1" to 3/4" square drive adapter from such a store on a
neighbor's truck lug nut and sheared it off. The guys watching were VERY
impressed that I'm that strong, not knowing the adapter was weak instead.

The same happened to me in the Army. Paint obscured the L on a truck wheel
stud and a friend and I stripped it by wrenching the wrong way. When I
admitted what I'd done without implicating the helper the mechanics'
attitude toward me jumped from dismissive to respectful, and they taught me
a lot about maintenance, such as how to replace that flat tire on a split
rim wheel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M35_se...x6_cargo_truck

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Old June 19th 20, 01:54 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default filing flats on a socket

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 21:27:59 +0000 (UTC)
maxq wrote:

snip
Old freewheel remover, the correct tool is NLA.

The freewheel has an internal splined face for the remover. The remover
has to slide over the axle and into the freewheel top, axle pokes out the
end of the remover.

The socket will get matching splines ground from its outer circumference
at the nut end.

A 12-point 9/16" socket is the right size, plus I can index it off a bolt
head - mount bolt in locked lathe chuck, head out with a strong spring
between the chuck face and the socket (mounted on the bolt with the nut
end outward). Dremel with 5 stacked cutoff disks on carriage, grind a
slot, pull the socket towards the face and switch points, grind the next
slot.


For those still following this... I suspect this may have been the
correct tool in 1984:
===
BR SHIMANO ''BOSS" FREEWHEEL REMOVER,

For the removal of Shimano's standard
freewheel of yester-year.

Item No: BR-CT4
19.5mm diameter

$3.70
===

From an old 1984 Third Hand Tools catalog on Archive.org he

https://archive.org/details/ThirdHan...ge/n9/mode/2up

My adapter/removal tool is for the old Shimano SIS models and is
slightly bigger, more like 22mm...

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI

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Old June 19th 20, 05:49 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default filing flats on a socket

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 11:09:30 +0000 (UTC), maxq wrote:

I'm making a special tool out of a 3/8 drive socket. It'll have to be
turned by a wrench or gripped by vise jaws. I'll file flats on the
square end.

Should the flats be parallel with the square's sides, or have the point
in the middle? This is a high-torque situation.


I have no scientific answer or explanation, but my gut feeling
suggests parallel.

BTW: Those sockets are really hard. Filing might be near impossible.
In a similar application, I used an angle grinder.
--
RoRo


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Old June 19th 20, 07:54 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default filing flats on a socket

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 18:44:11 -0400, Leon Fisk wrote:

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 18:11:47 -0400 Leon Fisk
wrote:

snip
Yeah, know exactly what you're talking about and probably have the one
you need. Think I have two of them, most likely fit old Shimano 5/6
sprocket free wheels.


Actually have four of them but only one splined. Checked an old Shimano
Freewheel that I know it fits and a 9/16 socket will slip inside. A
sharp edged 3/4 nut will catch the splines (12) in the freewheel...
Sounds like you need one a bit smaller in diameter than this

With all the metric and standard nuts around nowadays I would try
modifying one of those first. Even better if you happen to find a
coupling nut that fit, would give a longer length to work with...



Splines are 20mm spec, measure 20.2. I have a socket that's 19.97.
Happens to be 9/16 but I don't care, just want the outside right. The
14mm was a wee bit smaller.
  #27   Report Post  
Old June 19th 20, 07:59 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default filing flats on a socket

On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 18:49:16 +0200, Robert Roland wrote:

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 11:09:30 +0000 (UTC), maxq wrote:

I'm making a special tool out of a 3/8 drive socket. It'll have to be
turned by a wrench or gripped by vise jaws. I'll file flats on the
square end.

Should the flats be parallel with the square's sides, or have the point
in the middle? This is a high-torque situation.


I have no scientific answer or explanation, but my gut feeling suggests
parallel.

BTW: Those sockets are really hard. Filing might be near impossible. In
a similar application, I used an angle grinder.



It's soft now, drilled it already to clear the bolt shank. It'll be hard
again later.
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Old June 20th 20, 08:56 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 9,022
Default filing flats on a socket

On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 08:54:14 -0400, Leon Fisk
wrote:

On Thu, 18 Jun 2020 21:27:59 +0000 (UTC)
maxq wrote:

snip
Old freewheel remover, the correct tool is NLA.

The freewheel has an internal splined face for the remover. The remover
has to slide over the axle and into the freewheel top, axle pokes out the
end of the remover.

The socket will get matching splines ground from its outer circumference
at the nut end.

A 12-point 9/16" socket is the right size, plus I can index it off a bolt
head - mount bolt in locked lathe chuck, head out with a strong spring
between the chuck face and the socket (mounted on the bolt with the nut
end outward). Dremel with 5 stacked cutoff disks on carriage, grind a
slot, pull the socket towards the face and switch points, grind the next
slot.


For those still following this... I suspect this may have been the
correct tool in 1984:
===
BR SHIMANO ''BOSS" FREEWHEEL REMOVER,

For the removal of Shimano's standard
freewheel of yester-year.

Item No: BR-CT4
19.5mm diameter

$3.70
===

From an old 1984 Third Hand Tools catalog on Archive.org he

https://archive.org/details/ThirdHan...ge/n9/mode/2up

My adapter/removal tool is for the old Shimano SIS models and is
slightly bigger, more like 22mm...


The Google Fu is strong with this one.

--
There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action.

--Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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Old June 20th 20, 09:06 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 9,022
Default filing flats on a socket

On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 07:39:48 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
.. .

I'm guilty of the same practice. I shop at $1 Gewjaws R Us.


I was using a 1" to 3/4" square drive adapter from such a store on a
neighbor's truck lug nut and sheared it off. The guys watching were VERY
impressed that I'm that strong, not knowing the adapter was weak instead.


Who knew that melted potmetal rebar was that weak?
Congrats on the strength, too.


The same happened to me in the Army. Paint obscured the L on a truck wheel
stud and a friend and I stripped it by wrenching the wrong way. When I
admitted what I'd done without implicating the helper the mechanics'
attitude toward me jumped from dismissive to respectful, and they taught me
a lot about maintenance, such as how to replace that flat tire on a split
rim wheel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M35_se...x6_cargo_truck


Deuce and a half split rims? PASS. Those could be deadly as you
seated the bead. I know a guy who rode one and lived. And I saw a
video of one take a guy's head clean off. If they taught you split
rim stuff, I'm not so sure they were respectful. LOL

--
There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action.

--Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  #30   Report Post  
Old June 20th 20, 10:17 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default filing flats on a socket

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...

On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 07:39:48 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

Deuce and a half split rims? PASS. Those could be deadly as you
seated the bead. I know a guy who rode one and lived. And I saw a
video of one take a guy's head clean off. If they taught you split
rim stuff, I'm not so sure they were respectful. LOL

The bulged pipe and rebar cage for inflating them clearly showed what can
happen, and they made sure I understood the procedure.



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