Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old January 6th 20, 01:45 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Welding on a fuel tank (jerry can)

On Sun, 5 Jan 2020 17:16:54 -0800 (PST), Michael Terrell
wrote:

On Sunday, January 5, 2020 at 12:16:41 PM UTC-5, pyotr filipivich wrote:
on Sat, 4 Jan 2020 14:50:31 -0800 (PST) typed
in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I have done this many times.first wash out tank with liwuid gunk degreaser.flush it good with water.but tank on bench.stick airhose in tank low preasure.leave tank sit 5 minutes.leave airhose in while welding.no stangent fumes no explosion.a old mortorcycle mechanic taught me that 50 years ago


That will work.

So will filling it completely with the fluid of your choice. Water
is good, but a boss of mine brazed up the leak in the gas tank, on the
car, "$10 if you watch, double if you don't."
Yes, and even he admits "Not the brightest of ideas. but I did
make twenty bucks."



I tried the water method once, on a 30 gallon tank from a '73 Chevy stepvan. I rinsed it out, then filled it to the neck with water. I didn't even get the flame to the tank when it jumped two feet in the air, spun around a few times and swelled up enough to uncurl some of the crimped seams. It had a seven inch crack when I took it out of the truck, but Neither my neighbor or I expected areas that were eight inches under water to uncurl. GM's supplier was on strike, and had been for months. The junkyards had been picked bare of every usable tank for repair jobs. I lucked out and called a yard and was told, You're in luck, we just hauled in a truck a few minutes ago. $50, if you remove it. I was shocked that they used a forklift to tip the truck over, but I had the tank I needed.

A friend in highschool (back in '69) had a leak in the tank of his
'55 Fairlane. He drained it. left it sit overnight, then filled it
with water and started welding it. Within seconds he was on his back,
soaking wet with the tank across the driveway.

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Old January 6th 20, 02:09 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Welding on a fuel tank (jerry can)

Clare Snyder on Sun, 05 Jan 2020 20:45:28 -0500
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
On Sun, 5 Jan 2020 17:16:54 -0800 (PST), Michael Terrell
wrote:

On Sunday, January 5, 2020 at 12:16:41 PM UTC-5, pyotr filipivich wrote:
on Sat, 4 Jan 2020 14:50:31 -0800 (PST) typed
in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I have done this many times.first wash out tank with liwuid gunk degreaser.flush it good with water.but tank on bench.stick airhose in tank low preasure.leave tank sit 5 minutes.leave airhose in while welding.no stangent fumes no explosion.a old mortorcycle mechanic taught me that 50 years ago
That will work.
So will filling it completely with the fluid of your choice. Water
is good, but a boss of mine brazed up the leak in the gas tank, on the
car, "$10 if you watch, double if you don't."
Yes, and even he admits "Not the brightest of ideas. but I did
make twenty bucks."


I tried the water method once, on a 30 gallon tank from a '73 Chevy stepvan. I rinsed it out, then filled it to the neck with water. I didn't even get the flame to the tank when it jumped two feet in the air, spun around a few times and swelled up enough to uncurl some of the crimped seams. It had a seven inch crack when I took it out of the truck, but Neither my neighbor or I expected areas that were eight inches under water to uncurl. GM's supplier was on strike, and had been for months. The junkyards had been picked bare of every usable tank for repair jobs. I lucked out and called a yard and was told, You're in luck, we just hauled in a truck a few minutes ago. $50, if you remove it. I was shocked that they used a forklift to tip the truck over, but I had the tank I needed.

A friend in highschool (back in '69) had a leak in the tank of his
'55 Fairlane. He drained it. left it sit overnight, then filled it
with water and started welding it. Within seconds he was on his back,
soaking wet with the tank across the driveway.


I've heard of similar incidents. A motorcycle tank flying across
the shop.

Ask Nels about the issues involved in repairing an old fashioned
acetylene generator. The kind where you put the basket of calcium
carbide in the water and collected the gas as it bubbled off.


--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
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Old January 7th 20, 04:47 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Welding on a fuel tank (jerry can)

On Tue, 07 Jan 2020 02:08:33 -0500, "Steve W."
wrote:

Jim Wilkins wrote:
"Clare Snyder" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 4 Jan 2020 19:10:40 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 1/4/2020 5:49 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sat, 4 Jan 2020 14:50:31 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

I have done this many times.first wash out tank with liwuid gunk
degreaser.flush it good with water.but tank on bench.stick
airhose in tank low preasure.leave tank sit 5 minutes.leave
airhose in while welding.no stangent fumes no explosion.a old
mortorcycle mechanic taught me that 50 years ago
filling it with co2 from a fire extinguisher works pretty good.
Argon or CO2 either one , if you happen to have welding shield
gasses on
hand . Big plus is that it leaves the extinguisher usable for it's
intended purpose .
Disn't have sheilding gas - so I just sent the apprentice out to the
safety supply to borrow a 5 pounder


Would engine exhaust work?


Yes it will

Assuming the engine is running efficiently and not sewing large
amounts of CO and unburned hydrocarbons, yes.

I would be cautious about making that assumption using exhaust from
something other than a properly functioning emmission controlled
vehicle - don't, for instance, use your lawn mower or an old gasoline
tractor - - -

From OSHA



What are fire hazards and extinguishing media for carbon monoxide?


Flammable Properties: EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE GAS. Can easily ignite. Can
readily form explosive mixture with air at room temperature.

Suitable Extinguishing Media: Carbon dioxide, dry chemical powder,
appropriate foam, water spray or fog. Foam manufacturers should be
consulted for recommendations regarding types of foams and application
rates.

Specific Hazards Arising from the Chemical: Gas or vapour may
accumulate in hazardous amounts in low-lying areas especially inside
confined spaces, resulting in a health hazard. Heat from fire can
cause a rapid build-up of pressure inside cylinders. Explosive rupture
and a sudden release of large amounts of gas may result. Cylinder may
rocket. In a fire, the following hazardous materials may be generated:
Very toxic carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide.



?
What are the stability and reactivity hazards of carbon monoxide?

•Chemical Stability: Normally stable.
•Conditions to Avoid: Open flames, sparks, static discharge, heat and
other ignition sources.
•Incompatible Materials: Increased risk of fire and explosion on
contact with: oxidizing agents (e.g. peroxides), halogens (e.g.
chlorine), metals (e.g. aluminum). Not corrosive to: aluminum alloys,
stainless steel.
•Hazardous Decomposition Products: None known.
•Possibility of Hazardous Reactions: None known.
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Old January 7th 20, 06:44 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Welding on a fuel tank (jerry can)

If you weld a fule tank onto a vehicle, the first step is to be sure the
tank is full of fule.


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Old January 11th 20, 02:42 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Welding on a fuel tank (jerry can)

I worked at a tank farm. When there was a bullet hole in a
80,000 bbl. gasoline tank the SOP was to drive a plug into the
hole, & wait several days. (Can't recall if they were cork
or rubber or ?)

When and only when the level was ?3-6ft? feet above the plug,
and multiple explosive gas measurements were clear, the wall was
cleaned of its epoxy paint, a plate was placed around the plug
and held in place. Then the welder came in and welded the plate
to the tank wall on all sides. After it cooled, it was primed
and painted.

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Old January 11th 20, 04:49 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Welding on a fuel tank (jerry can)

In David Lesher writes:

I worked at a tank farm. When there was a bullet hole in a
80,000 bbl. gasoline tank the SOP was to drive a plug into the
hole, & wait several days. (Can't recall if they were cork
or rubber or ?)


When and only when the level was ?3-6ft? feet above the plug,
and multiple explosive gas measurements were clear, the wall was
cleaned of its epoxy paint, a plate was placed around the plug
and held in place. Then the welder came in and welded the plate
to the tank wall on all sides. After it cooled, it was primed
and painted.


If only they had Gorilla Tape. Or Flex Seal...


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