Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old November 19th 19, 05:32 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Jacks

Two totally different jacks for a wide range of interest.

FARM JACK
Can't go wrong with an actual name brand Hi-Lift. If you want to save
money Reese is crap in my opinion. The forged (cast?) Harbor Freight
Jacks are better. I don't like the stamped and welded from any
manufacturer or reseller.

MACHINIST JACK
I haven't used one. I do almost exclusively CNC and I want my machining
cutting the part as fast as possible. Time IS money. I've always been
afraid that a jack may slip if the machine is doing hard fast reversals.
Is pinching it between the piece of stock and the table enough to keep
it from moving? I do a lot of aluminum so flex is really an issue.
Most times if I need to cut larger pieces of stock I usually put two
vises on the table. Sometimes its not practical or extremely
inconvenient. For example if I have a setup on part of the table I
don't want to tear down because I'm half way through a multiple piece
order, or on the smaller machines if its just not practical to have two
vises on the table. Do any/many of you use a stud on the bottom of a
machinist jack to secure it to the table with a t-nut? What about a
swivel pad on a jack? Is that a good idea?


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Old November 20th 19, 12:51 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Jacks

"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
...
Two totally different jacks for a wide range of interest.

FARM JACK
Can't go wrong with an actual name brand Hi-Lift. If you want to
save money Reese is crap in my opinion. The forged (cast?) Harbor
Freight Jacks are better. I don't like the stamped and welded from
any manufacturer or reseller.

MACHINIST JACK
I haven't used one. I do almost exclusively CNC and I want my
machining cutting the part as fast as possible. Time IS money.
I've always been afraid that a jack may slip if the machine is doing
hard fast reversals. Is pinching it between the piece of stock and
the table enough to keep it from moving? I do a lot of aluminum so
flex is really an issue. Most times if I need to cut larger pieces
of stock I usually put two vises on the table. Sometimes its not
practical or extremely inconvenient. For example if I have a setup
on part of the table I don't want to tear down because I'm half way
through a multiple piece order, or on the smaller machines if its
just not practical to have two vises on the table. Do any/many of
you use a stud on the bottom of a machinist jack to secure it to the
table with a t-nut? What about a swivel pad on a jack? Is that a
good idea?


I've used an Enco clamping kit , threaded rod couplers and tee slot
studs to set up rigid supports under overhanging work to drill it. I
think the swivel-top jacks are more suited to supporting irregular
castings. The only outboard support I use with rectangular stock is
blocks the height of the vise table.




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