Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11   Report Post  
Old November 3rd 19, 02:56 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,299
Default air tank for vacuum

Robert Roland on Sat, 02 Nov 2019 20:08:58 +0100
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
On Fri, 1 Nov 2019 00:30:16 -0400, "Carl"
wrote:

I'm also curious how the 55 gal drums failed - did
the ends or the side give way and implode?


I'm sure it will vary, but here are some school kids trying it out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsoE4F2Pb20


The Mythbuster guys managed to collapse a tank car. But they had
to "ding" the tank to compromise the structural integrity first. (The
first time they tried, they got a vacuum of 27 inches Hg, but no
collapse. Third time, they dropped a 3,200 lb concrete block on it,
and the tank collapse at 23 inches Hg.)

--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."

  #12   Report Post  
Old November 4th 19, 02:55 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,000
Default air tank for vacuum

On Saturday, November 2, 2019 at 6:56:25 PM UTC-7, pyotr filipivich wrote:

The Mythbuster guys managed to collapse a tank car. But they had
to "ding" the tank to compromise the structural integrity first


Yeah, that's the key; a round tank (or even a flat lid atop a can) doesn't
spontaneously break symmetry, you have to START that. So,
an undented drum should hold vacuum well (it's only 14 psi)
just as a beer can should be hard to crush. But, I can
hold the beer can and dent the sides with my fingers, then a little
twist... and it's flat in seconds.

Half-crumpled 50 gal tanks can be re-formed to original shape, quickly,
if you have a blasting cap handy...
  #13   Report Post  
Old November 4th 19, 06:44 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,299
Default air tank for vacuum

whit3rd on Sun, 3 Nov 2019 17:55:12 -0800 (PST)
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
On Saturday, November 2, 2019 at 6:56:25 PM UTC-7, pyotr filipivich wrote:

The Mythbuster guys managed to collapse a tank car. But they had
to "ding" the tank to compromise the structural integrity first


Yeah, that's the key; a round tank (or even a flat lid atop a can) doesn't
spontaneously break symmetry, you have to START that. So,
an undented drum should hold vacuum well (it's only 14 psi)
just as a beer can should be hard to crush. But, I can
hold the beer can and dent the sides with my fingers, then a little
twist... and it's flat in seconds.


Old "trick" balance on an empty popcan.
Then reach down and tap the sides. "Crunch!" as the can
collapses.

Half-crumpled 50 gal tanks can be re-formed to original shape, quickly,
if you have a blasting cap handy...


"a little gasoline, a torch, good as new."
--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
  #14   Report Post  
Old November 4th 19, 03:55 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 5,829
Default air tank for vacuum

"pyotr filipivich" wrote in message
...
whit3rd on Sun, 3 Nov 2019 17:55:12 -0800 (PST)
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
On Saturday, November 2, 2019 at 6:56:25 PM UTC-7, pyotr filipivich
wrote:

The Mythbuster guys managed to collapse a tank car. But they had
to "ding" the tank to compromise the structural integrity first


Yeah, that's the key; a round tank (or even a flat lid atop a can)
doesn't
spontaneously break symmetry, you have to START that. So,
an undented drum should hold vacuum well (it's only 14 psi)
just as a beer can should be hard to crush. But, I can
hold the beer can and dent the sides with my fingers, then a little
twist... and it's flat in seconds.


Old "trick" balance on an empty popcan.
Then reach down and tap the sides. "Crunch!" as the can
collapses.

Half-crumpled 50 gal tanks can be re-formed to original shape,
quickly,
if you have a blasting cap handy...


"a little gasoline, a torch, good as new."
--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."



  #15   Report Post  
Old November 4th 19, 04:00 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 5,829
Default air tank for vacuum

"pyotr filipivich" wrote in message
...
whit3rd on Sun, 3 Nov 2019 17:55:12 -0800 (PST)
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
On Saturday, November 2, 2019 at 6:56:25 PM UTC-7, pyotr filipivich
wrote:


Half-crumpled 50 gal tanks can be re-formed to original shape,
quickly,
if you have a blasting cap handy...


"a little gasoline, a torch, good as new."
--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."


A New England winter gives a rain-filled 55 gallon drum a neatly domed
end.




  #16   Report Post  
Old November 7th 19, 07:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2019
Posts: 2
Default air tank for vacuum

replying to bob prohaska, Leighton1210 wrote:
It is 68 weight hydraulic oil. The real issue with it isn't the amount of oil
we are trying to vacuum up. The issue is the heat involved along with the
length of hose needed to do the job. I apologize for not stating that in the
original text. The hose is 15 foot long, 1 inch diameter. The depth of the
oil is only around 1 to 1 1/2 inches, but, it covers an area approximately 160
square feet. I would be constantly pulling air along with the oil.
Sometimes, though, there is debris that will get vacuumed up. All of these
minor items, i believe, causes the issue that I have. I'm just not sure of a
good way to do this, other than when the oil is cooled off. As for the valve
on the vacuum line, I should be able to put a valve on the vacuum head. I can
make it adjustable and see what happens.

--
for full context, visit https://www.polytechforum.com/metalw...um-649262-.htm


  #17   Report Post  
Old November 7th 19, 07:45 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2019
Posts: 2
Default air tank for vacuum

On Tuesday, October 29, 2019 at 11:18:06 PM UTC-4, Leighton1210 wrote:
I need a way to vacuum hot oil without collapsing a vessel. We have been
using 55 gallon drums for oil that has cooled down, but, they will collapse
when enough hot oil is vacuumed into them. My thought was to use a 20 gallon,
200 psi, 650 degree F rated air tank. This would not be a true vacuum. There
will be constant air flow. The hot oil that we need to vacuum is only about 1
to 1 1/2 inches deep, so, a standard hot oil pump will not work.

-- For more than 10 years we sucked used coolant into 55 gallon drums with a vacuum motor bolted to the lift off lid no problems with collapsing at all, but we used 2inch ID hose. As others have said only 15psi max with a hivac pump not a vacuum cleaner type setup. You should be able to empty in less than a minute.
for full context, visit https://www.polytechforum.com/metalw...um-649262-.htm


  #18   Report Post  
Old November 8th 19, 12:59 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2012
Posts: 327
Default air tank for vacuum

On Thu, 7 Nov 2019 18:18:02 +0000, Leighton1210
wrote:

replying to bob prohaska, Leighton1210 wrote:
It is 68 weight hydraulic oil. The real issue with it isn't the amount of oil
we are trying to vacuum up. The issue is the heat involved along with the
length of hose needed to do the job. I apologize for not stating that in the
original text. The hose is 15 foot long, 1 inch diameter. The depth of the
oil is only around 1 to 1 1/2 inches, but, it covers an area approximately 160
square feet. I would be constantly pulling air along with the oil.
Sometimes, though, there is debris that will get vacuumed up. All of these
minor items, i believe, causes the issue that I have. I'm just not sure of a
good way to do this, other than when the oil is cooled off. As for the valve
on the vacuum line, I should be able to put a valve on the vacuum head. I can
make it adjustable and see what happens.


Where is the oil before it gets spread out like that? Any chance of
using gravity to collect it? Or vacuum it out of whatever it came out
of?
  #19   Report Post  
Old November 16th 19, 12:44 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2014
Posts: 132
Default air tank for vacuum



Jim Wilkins wrote:


A New England winter gives a rain-filled 55 gallon drum a neatly domed
end.


The water expands as it freezes?
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.8*10^12 furlongs per fortnight.
  #20   Report Post  
Old November 16th 19, 01:22 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 5,829
Default air tank for vacuum

"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
...


Jim Wilkins wrote:


A New England winter gives a rain-filled 55 gallon drum a neatly
domed
end.


The water expands as it freezes?
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.8*10^12 furlongs per fortnight.


It freezes first on the exposed top and sides, last on the
ground-insulated bottom which then has the least resistance to
expansion pressure. Above-ground swimming pools are protected by
floating air-filled pillows on top to leave unfrozen or at least
weaker openings for the water in the center to escape through.

If all the pillows deflate the walls bulge instead and I acquire more
highly rust resistant sheet metal for projects.




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Adding external air tank to existing air compressor to give equivalent bigger tank blueman Woodworking 49 November 3rd 11 03:54 PM
Using an air tank for vacuum? [email protected] Metalworking 0 February 5th 06 06:31 AM
Using an air tank for vacuum? RAM³ Metalworking 1 February 5th 06 02:15 AM
Using an air tank for vacuum? Don Foreman Metalworking 1 February 5th 06 12:13 AM
Home water tank water tank pressure not right, do I need a new tank? Gary Slusser Home Repair 2 August 11th 03 05:45 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:32 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2021 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017