Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old April 27th 19, 02:42 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Fri, 26 Apr 2019 17:13:06 -0400, Ed Huntress
wrote:
See what I mean, John?


See what I mean John? See what I mean?

Guess what **** in a dress? Even John doesn't believe you. John isn't
so stupid that he can't Google your troll posts in the survival
groups.

Hell, I've thrown you back over the fence so many times that John
doesn't even have to leave the group to know that you are a first
class troll who trolls for minors to have gay sex with.

Isn't that true **** in a Dress? Of course it is. Google is your
friend John. ****dress wants to **** your minor sonin the ass.

Stay out of the survivalist groups **** in a dress troll. The people
there are protective of their children and know how to take care of
creeps like you. You do realize that you were voted to be the first
to catch a bullet between the eyes if ever SHTF?

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Old April 27th 19, 04:17 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Fri, 26 Apr 2019 00:39:05 -0400, Ed Huntress
wrote:

On Thu, 25 Apr 2019 23:45:31 -0400, Gerry
wrote:

On Fri, 26 Apr 2019 08:49:54 +0700, John B.
wrote:

On Thu, 25 Apr 2019 15:57:09 -0700, Bob La Londe
wrote:


On 4/25/2019 1:42 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:
"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
...
...What about a machinist... No. Just ask any old manual machinist.
I'm just a hack, button pushing, shade tree, wannabe by the very
fact that I never serviced apprenticeship for 3 lifetimes in a steam
powered line shop. LOL.


Hmmm, at age 18 I did operate machine tools in a factory with overhead
line shafts and leather belts. Can I call myself a machinist?




Only if it was steam (water wheel is ok) powered and the old guys in the
shop always sneered down their noses at you and said you weren't a real
machinist if you didn't serve an apprenticeship beating metal over an
anvil first.

Actually I'm old enough that when I served my apprenticeship there
were still a few of those old guys around. My "apprentice master" was
well into his 60's and had "gone in the shop" when he was 14 years
old. I never heard them talk about beating metal over an anvil. About
the only ones left that did that when I was a boy were
Farriers, who shoed the few working horses left and they worked to
tolerances of, "well about that much" :-)

If it has any bearing - my maternal grandfather shoed his first horse
when he was eight years old. Latter life saw him modify the steering
system on the Ford 999 to suit Barney Oldfield's cycle racing
experience.


Did you get any photos of him with 999, Gerry? That's quite a piece of
racing history.

Unfortunately not, and the only photo of his Cadillac with the Ford
motor after the original was burned, was stolen from my uncle when he
took it to school (U of T) for "show & tell". However my son still has
the dinning room table where my Grandmother found him refinishing the
damaged body when she returned from visiting her sister in Canada.
He did have some great stories from his experiences working with
automotive pioneers.
When I took my son to see the 999 several years ago, his first comment
was "Dad, it's made of WOOD!"
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Old April 27th 19, 05:44 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Fri, 26 Apr 2019 23:17:09 -0400, Gerry
wrote:

On Fri, 26 Apr 2019 00:39:05 -0400, Ed Huntress
wrote:

On Thu, 25 Apr 2019 23:45:31 -0400, Gerry
wrote:

On Fri, 26 Apr 2019 08:49:54 +0700, John B.
wrote:

On Thu, 25 Apr 2019 15:57:09 -0700, Bob La Londe
wrote:


On 4/25/2019 1:42 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:
"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
...
...What about a machinist... No. Just ask any old manual machinist.
I'm just a hack, button pushing, shade tree, wannabe by the very
fact that I never serviced apprenticeship for 3 lifetimes in a steam
powered line shop. LOL.


Hmmm, at age 18 I did operate machine tools in a factory with overhead
line shafts and leather belts. Can I call myself a machinist?




Only if it was steam (water wheel is ok) powered and the old guys in the
shop always sneered down their noses at you and said you weren't a real
machinist if you didn't serve an apprenticeship beating metal over an
anvil first.

Actually I'm old enough that when I served my apprenticeship there
were still a few of those old guys around. My "apprentice master" was
well into his 60's and had "gone in the shop" when he was 14 years
old. I never heard them talk about beating metal over an anvil. About
the only ones left that did that when I was a boy were
Farriers, who shoed the few working horses left and they worked to
tolerances of, "well about that much" :-)
If it has any bearing - my maternal grandfather shoed his first horse
when he was eight years old. Latter life saw him modify the steering
system on the Ford 999 to suit Barney Oldfield's cycle racing
experience.


Did you get any photos of him with 999, Gerry? That's quite a piece of
racing history.

Unfortunately not, and the only photo of his Cadillac with the Ford
motor after the original was burned, was stolen from my uncle when he
took it to school (U of T) for "show & tell". However my son still has
the dinning room table where my Grandmother found him refinishing the
damaged body when she returned from visiting her sister in Canada.
He did have some great stories from his experiences working with
automotive pioneers.
When I took my son to see the 999 several years ago, his first comment
was "Dad, it's made of WOOD!"


It's good to have a family connection to something like that, for your
son to remember and appreciate. The people who drove those cars had
guts that are hard to believe. During one year of circle-track racing
in California in the early '20s, an average just under one driver per
race died in crashes.

--
Ed Huntress
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Old April 27th 19, 12:47 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Ed Huntress" wrote in message
...
...
It's good to have a family connection to something like that, for
your
son to remember and appreciate. The people who drove those cars had
guts that are hard to believe. During one year of circle-track
racing
in California in the early '20s, an average just under one driver
per
race died in crashes.

--
Ed Huntress


That was little different from the chances an aviator of the time
willingly risked.


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Old April 27th 19, 03:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Sat, 27 Apr 2019 07:47:21 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Ed Huntress" wrote in message
.. .
...
It's good to have a family connection to something like that, for
your
son to remember and appreciate. The people who drove those cars had
guts that are hard to believe. During one year of circle-track
racing
in California in the early '20s, an average just under one driver
per
race died in crashes.

--
Ed Huntress


That was little different from the chances an aviator of the time
willingly risked.


Right. And I sometimes wonder what the hell went through their heads.

--
Ed Huntress


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Old April 27th 19, 03:39 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Sat, 27 Apr 2019 10:18:16 -0400
Ed Huntress wrote:

On Sat, 27 Apr 2019 07:47:21 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Ed Huntress" wrote in message
. ..

[...]

That was little different from the chances an aviator of the time
willingly risked.


Right. And I sometimes wonder what the hell went through their heads.


That the odds were for those "other" guys. It wasn't going to happen to
them...

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI

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Old April 27th 19, 04:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Sat, 27 Apr 2019 10:39:45 -0400, Leon Fisk
wrote:

On Sat, 27 Apr 2019 10:18:16 -0400
Ed Huntress wrote:

On Sat, 27 Apr 2019 07:47:21 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Ed Huntress" wrote in message
...

[...]

That was little different from the chances an aviator of the time
willingly risked.


Right. And I sometimes wonder what the hell went through their heads.


That the odds were for those "other" guys. It wasn't going to happen to
them...


Yeah, some version of that. But there must have been more. Stirling
Moss, the great race car driver, said that the danger was a big part
of the atraction for him. He was drawn to it.

I don't get it. My personal risk/reward ratio doesn't include getting
off on risks for the sake of thrills.

That's why I don't go rock climbing. g

--
Ed Huntress
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Old April 27th 19, 04:30 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Leon Fisk" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 27 Apr 2019 10:18:16 -0400
Ed Huntress wrote:

On Sat, 27 Apr 2019 07:47:21 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Ed Huntress" wrote in message
...

[...]

That was little different from the chances an aviator of the time
willingly risked.


Right. And I sometimes wonder what the hell went through their
heads.


That the odds were for those "other" guys. It wasn't going to happen
to
them...

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI


Eddie Rickenbacker related in his memoir how "Mutiny on the Bounty"
author James Norman Hall liked to practice aerobatic maneuvers over
German antiaircraft batteries. In WW2 Saburo Sakai and two other aces
pulled the same stunt over Port Moresby in New Guinea.
http://planejunkie.com/the-tainan-ai...-port-moresby/


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Old April 27th 19, 04:56 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Jim Wilkins" wrote in message ...



I didn't have a proper anvil until I was a teen; it was on a shelf in
a friend's garage and had my name plainly stamped on the side,
WILKIN(son), the last 3 missing over a depression. They were a family
of lawyers who had no use for such tools.

Before that I had to pound metal on rocks and stumps and chunks of
discarded scrap iron my grandfather and uncle had brought home from
that factory. Stumps work surprisingly well and leave a smooth finish.
Rocks, not so good.

**************

I have pounded metal on the ground in the sand before. It was in fact
inspired by this group talking about using a leather covered sand bag to
beat sheet metal into shape. I had a badly dented motor cover interfering
with the operation of the cooling fan on a motor. I took a ball pein
hammer, walked out in the yard, and set the cover in the dirt, where I
proceeded to beat on it with the hammer. It looks hammered, but its roughly
back to a suitable shape and has been in use for a dozen years or so.


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Old April 27th 19, 05:02 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Gerry" wrote in message ...

If it has any bearing - my maternal grandfather shoed his first horse
when he was eight years old. Latter life saw him modify the steering
system on the Ford 999 to suit Barney Oldfield's cycle racing
experience.

****

My maternal grandfather was a World War(S) era machinist. He was born well
before 1900. Exactly when I am not sure. Nobody seems to know. I have
several of his tools. My dad bought them or traded them from him many years
ago and pretty much never used most of it. A few years ago he gave me the
lot as a Christmas present. I'd have to say it was one of the very best
presents I have ever received. I do use some of the stuff from time to
time. Some has been really useful.



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