Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old February 3rd 19, 03:49 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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I know. I know. That's not really a thing. Still I was welding up some
T-handles on thread rod for some tools yesterday. I noticed that for just a
fraction of a second at the beginning of the first weld on a part the weld
would be unstable and throw a little spatter. Then it would stabilize and
weld perfectly. All I can attribute it to is that it took a tiny fraction
of a second for gas to reach the nozzle. Still if the gas solenoid was
triggered half a second before the wire was electrified I can't help but
think the start would be better. When I shut the welder off I happened to
notice my CFH gage was showing a little under 20, and the welder recommends
30 for everything on the flip chart. The other day welding hinges on some
thin wall rectangular tube 20 seemed to be fine. Maybe it was just the
shape of the t-bolt? Maybe the 30CFH setting hits the nozzle quicker? I
have the regulator style flow gages.

P.S. Referring back to my issues with this welder and the bad gas
diffuses... I use MIG welding as the fast fall back tool for a lot of
things I'd often find other means for in the past. Even my crappy welds
look better. I haven't used my little flux core only machine since,
although I still would outdoors.


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Old February 3rd 19, 05:05 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Preflow on MIG

On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 08:49:59 -0700
"Bob La Londe" wrote:

I know. I know. That's not really a thing. Still I was welding up some
T-handles on thread rod for some tools yesterday. I noticed that for just a
fraction of a second at the beginning of the first weld on a part the weld
would be unstable and throw a little spatter. Then it would stabilize and
weld perfectly. All I can attribute it to is that it took a tiny fraction
of a second for gas to reach the nozzle. Still if the gas solenoid was
triggered half a second before the wire was electrified I can't help but
think the start would be better. When I shut the welder off I happened to
notice my CFH gage was showing a little under 20, and the welder recommends
30 for everything on the flip chart. The other day welding hinges on some
thin wall rectangular tube 20 seemed to be fine. Maybe it was just the
shape of the t-bolt? Maybe the 30CFH setting hits the nozzle quicker? I
have the regulator style flow gages.

P.S. Referring back to my issues with this welder and the bad gas
diffuses... I use MIG welding as the fast fall back tool for a lot of
things I'd often find other means for in the past. Even my crappy welds
look better. I haven't used my little flux core only machine since,
although I still would outdoors.


Higher flow rates can cause turbulence and possible bad coverage. When
I was doing a lot of welding for my Dad on a couple products. I would
run 8 CFH with 75/25 gas. No reason to run 30 when 8 would make
perfectly good welds. My favorite nozzle is slightly reduced/tapered at
the tip. Looks a lot like this:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072WDVJJ6/

I couldn't get away with running 8 using big stove pipe nozzles
though. Never needed one that large unless trying to weld 3/8 in a
single pass which has its own set of problems...

Lighting up, starting out is always troublesome. You might want to try
lighting up a 1/4 to 1/2 inch from where you want to start and then
rapidly back up to that point once your arc is established. Picked this
tip up from watching Jody's videos and works well. Providing I remember
to do it, don't weld that often anymore...

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI

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Old February 3rd 19, 09:52 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Preflow on MIG

On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 13:05:33 -0400
Leon Fisk wrote:

Higher flow rates can cause turbulence and possible bad coverage. When
I was doing a lot of welding for my Dad on a couple products. I would
run 8 CFH with 75/25 gas. No reason to run 30 when 8 would make
perfectly good welds.


Dang! Thinking about this later on and I'm sure that should have been
12 CFH and not 8. So anywhere you see 8 just pretend it is really 12
okay

A lot depends on what you're welding too. Laying into a corner filet or
inside some small area will take a lot less gas flow than something
flat, vertical, on-edge... you get the idea. Argon is heavier than air
and will tend to settle and fill contained areas...

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI

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Old February 4th 19, 08:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Leon Fisk" wrote in message ...

On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 13:05:33 -0400
Leon Fisk wrote:

Higher flow rates can cause turbulence and possible bad coverage. When
I was doing a lot of welding for my Dad on a couple products. I would
run 8 CFH with 75/25 gas. No reason to run 30 when 8 would make
perfectly good welds.


Dang! Thinking about this later on and I'm sure that should have been
12 CFH and not 8. So anywhere you see 8 just pretend it is really 12
okay

A lot depends on what you're welding too. Laying into a corner filet or
inside some small area will take a lot less gas flow than something
flat, vertical, on-edge... you get the idea. Argon is heavier than air
and will tend to settle and fill contained areas...

**************

I'm trying to spend less time looking for fault on-line, but I thought 8 CFH
sounded awfully hopeful.

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Old February 4th 19, 09:11 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Preflow on MIG

On Mon, 4 Feb 2019 13:18:42 -0700
"Bob La Londe" wrote:

snip
I'm trying to spend less time looking for fault on-line, but I thought 8 CFH
sounded awfully hopeful.


Sometimes I use to run that low BUT... it had to do with what I was
welding. It was inside maybe a 3 inch ID tube that was about 3 inches
long standing upright. Needed to weld a pressed in plug to
the bottom. You really don't need much gas because there is nowhere for
it to go other than up and out of the piece. I think I still have some
of those parts around if you can't visualize this. When you weld say 50+
parts like this for an hour or two that is a lot of wasted gas if you
left it set at 20 CFH...

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI



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Old February 12th 19, 06:42 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 10,282
Default Preflow on MIG

On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 08:49:59 -0700, "Bob La Londe"
wrote:

I know. I know. That's not really a thing. Still I was welding up some
T-handles on thread rod for some tools yesterday. I noticed that for just a
fraction of a second at the beginning of the first weld on a part the weld
would be unstable and throw a little spatter. Then it would stabilize and
weld perfectly. All I can attribute it to is that it took a tiny fraction
of a second for gas to reach the nozzle. Still if the gas solenoid was
triggered half a second before the wire was electrified I can't help but
think the start would be better. When I shut the welder off I happened to
notice my CFH gage was showing a little under 20, and the welder recommends
30 for everything on the flip chart. The other day welding hinges on some
thin wall rectangular tube 20 seemed to be fine. Maybe it was just the
shape of the t-bolt? Maybe the 30CFH setting hits the nozzle quicker? I
have the regulator style flow gages.

P.S. Referring back to my issues with this welder and the bad gas
diffuses... I use MIG welding as the fast fall back tool for a lot of
things I'd often find other means for in the past. Even my crappy welds
look better. I haven't used my little flux core only machine since,
although I still would outdoors.


What gases are you using? As a side note..yeah..use whatever pressure
is recommended by your welders manufacture. I have a little guard
system...just 3 12x12 panes of lucite formed into 2/3rds of a box,
that I tend to mig weld inside of. My welding shop is a covered 16x16'
area..with sheet steel fenceing on 2 sides..so wind isnt a BIG
problem..but it is a minor problem. Blows the shielding gases away.
The little 3 sided gizmo helps keep gas where it belongs.

__

"Poor widdle Wudy...mentally ill, lies constantly, doesnt know who he is, or even what gender "he" is.

No more pathetic creature has ever walked the earth. But...he is locked into a mental hospital for the safety of the public.

Which is a very good thing."

Asun rauhassa, valmistaudun sotaan.


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