Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old February 1st 19, 07:11 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?


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Old February 1st 19, 01:15 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Cydrome Leader" wrote in message
...
It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth
and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?


https://piehtoolco.com/contents/en-us/d1439.html

I've seen them in a blackmith shop but never in the New England
museums or used machinery stores I've visited. That may only mean they
sell quickly, like anvils and other desirable small-shop machinery.

The blacksmith had custom forging dies in them to leave his power
hammer free for general work.
-jsw


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Old February 1st 19, 03:03 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 1:11:19 AM UTC-5, Cydrome Leader wrote:
It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?


That's a "fly press": a flywheel screw press. No, they aren't common in the US. Apparently they've been around for a long time in forge shops in other parts of the world, including Europe.

I never saw one but I remember seeing photos when I was an editor at American Machinist, back in the '70s.

--
Ed Huntress
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Old February 1st 19, 04:13 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 06:11:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader
wrote:

It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?

I'd call it a "rotary inertia" or "worm gear inertia" press and it
is not common in North America from what I've seen.
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Old February 1st 19, 08:40 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

On Fri, 01 Feb 2019 10:13:12 -0500
Clare Snyder wrote:

On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 06:11:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader
wrote:

It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?

I'd call it a "rotary inertia" or "worm gear inertia" press and it
is not common in North America from what I've seen.


That's because Andrew has been hoarding them all in Texas:

https://www.instagram.com/blacksmith...p/BYjxXCmjvtY/

Seriously though, he would be a good one to call if you want one. He
seems to come across them pretty often...

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI



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Old February 2nd 19, 12:23 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 06:11:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader
wrote:

It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?


**** thats old school! 1800s technology. Has to be a bitch to set for
travel as well.

They were very common at one time...but they are tough to setup, hard
to stop, and as a result..incredibly unsafe.

Hence..they are not used in the US anymore..and havent been for
probably 100 yrs

__

"Poor widdle Wudy...mentally ill, lies constantly, doesnt know who he is, or even what gender "he" is.

No more pathetic creature has ever walked the earth. But...he is locked into a mental hospital for the safety of the public.

Which is a very good thing."

Asun rauhassa, valmistaudun sotaan.


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Old February 2nd 19, 01:26 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 00:19:54 +0000, David Billington
wrote:

On 01/02/2019 06:11, Cydrome Leader wrote:
It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?

I've not seen a powered one like that but it's basically a fly press as
others have mentioned. For manual operation they're quite nice as you
get a feel for the energy input required to do the job so you adjust
accordingly. I have one and they're quite common in the UK. The pic
posted of a bunch of them in Texas looks a lot like Norton or Sweeney &
Blocksidge but I expect they were made in the US as well.


What do the heavy balls do for getting a feel for the work?

__

"Poor widdle Wudy...mentally ill, lies constantly, doesnt know who he is, or even what gender "he" is.

No more pathetic creature has ever walked the earth. But...he is locked into a mental hospital for the safety of the public.

Which is a very good thing."

Asun rauhassa, valmistaudun sotaan.


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Old February 2nd 19, 01:57 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

"Gunner Asch" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 06:11:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader
wrote:

It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth
and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?


**** thats old school! 1800s technology. Has to be a bitch to set
for
travel as well.

They were very common at one time...but they are tough to setup,
hard
to stop, and as a result..incredibly unsafe.

Hence..they are not used in the US anymore..and havent been for
probably 100 yrs


From what little I saw the top die descends until the workpiece stops
it, which suits them to stamping identical repetitive details on
batches of variably thick hand-forged parts for wrought-iron railings
etc. I think an arbor press would be as or more useful to a machinist.


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Old February 2nd 19, 03:14 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

Gunner Asch on Fri, 01 Feb 2019 15:23:43 -0800
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 06:11:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader
wrote:

It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?


**** thats old school! 1800s technology. Has to be a bitch to set for
travel as well.


Can you imagine the working conditions which made this an
improvement?

I mean, - the alternative is hitting them with a hammer.
--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
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Old February 2nd 19, 03:52 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default what type of press is this?

On Fri, 01 Feb 2019 18:14:18 -0800, pyotr filipivich
wrote:

Gunner Asch on Fri, 01 Feb 2019 15:23:43 -0800
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 06:11:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader
wrote:

It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and
presses on the work using a heavy screw.

No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?t=427

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?


**** thats old school! 1800s technology. Has to be a bitch to set for
travel as well.


Can you imagine the working conditions which made this an
improvement?

I mean, - the alternative is hitting them with a hammer.



I always loved this one...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yL1AgOqnYYE


On a side note...this is cool .....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHbI_B2sPA0

__

"Poor widdle Wudy...mentally ill, lies constantly, doesnt know who he is, or even what gender "he" is.

No more pathetic creature has ever walked the earth. But...he is locked into a mental hospital for the safety of the public.

Which is a very good thing."

Asun rauhassa, valmistaudun sotaan.


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