Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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  #31   Report Post  
Old February 16th 17, 02:28 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Best drive belts?

"Leon Fisk" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 23:35:54 -0500
"Jim Wilkins" wrote:

snip
Sure, if you have the finesse to stop short of the pavement
underneath, or planned to repave it in the spring.


Many years ago I help an old girlfriends brother clear his driveway.
He had been driving over the snow and had solid pack maybe 8-10
inches
thick. We used his roto-tiller to loosen it up and then shovel off
the
debris. There was cement underneath. His idea/plan. It didn't work
too
bad. I wouldn't want to use my tiller though unless there was say
gravel underneath. An old set of tines would be best. I saw the
drive
once the snow was gone and you couldn't see any obvious damage. No
more
than tire chains would make.

--
Leon Fisk


I stopped using my home-made bucket loader to clear snow after it
knocked chunks of asphalt out of the edge of the driveway. It also
made a mess of the yard if the ground wasn't frozen solid before the
snow fell, i.e. the snow came with a cold front.

The skids on the edges of the bucket sank uselessly into the soft mud
that forms when the top layer of soil melts but can't drain through
the ice below it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rasputitsa
-jsw



  #32   Report Post  
Old February 16th 17, 02:42 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 1,322
Default Best drive belts?

On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 09:28:04 -0500
"Jim Wilkins" wrote:

snip
I stopped using my home-made bucket loader to clear snow after it
knocked chunks of asphalt out of the edge of the driveway. It also
made a mess of the yard if the ground wasn't frozen solid before the
snow fell, i.e. the snow came with a cold front.


Yeah, really common collateral damage with snow plow removal. It
doesn't seem to bother my neighbors but then most of them use lawn
service companies (usually the same guy that plows). So it's not their
cleanup problem...

You should see what the County Road Plows rip up around the area. The
trucks have side-wing plows now. Make a real mess of it when the
shoulder isn't froze up underneath.

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
Remove no.spam for email

  #33   Report Post  
Old February 16th 17, 04:05 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 8,374
Default Best drive belts?

On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 23:35:54 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
.. .
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 13:33:41 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:


The consistency of the snowbank the road plows leave across the
driveway is somewhere between gravel and hard-frozen ice cream,
shading to wet concrete mix if it partly melts on a sunny day. Guess
what that turns into at night.


Something just ripe for a pick mattock? Thot so.


Sure, if you have the finesse to stop short of the pavement
underneath, or planned to repave it in the spring.


One could use the reverse croquet stance, sir, as if hitting the ball
back between one's legs, wot? Or how about the side strike, splitting
the mound vertically so you could roll boulders of it to the side?


I've tried my winter climbing gear on a frozen snowbank.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_axe


Ah. I see. You -were- nuts, climbing up icicles. Eek!


It would have been the right tool to carve stair steps up and over the
bank but was nowhere near enough to hack out a vehicle-sized opening.


I hadn't even considered something that light and small to attack a
couple-foot thick mound of solid ice. Aren't they used for clearing
ice from crevices to insert expanders or set pitons?


It's sharper than a mattock since it doesn't strike rocks (much). It
can't be too sharp because the self-arrest technique if you slip is to
hastily grab the wide blade (3) and force the long blade (1) down into
the snow.


Sounds like great fun...for you. Enjoy. I very much prefer snowless
areas.

--
In order to become the master, the politician poses as the servant.
--Charles de Gaulle

  #34   Report Post  
Old February 16th 17, 04:16 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 8,374
Default Best drive belts?

On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 09:28:04 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Leon Fisk" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 23:35:54 -0500
"Jim Wilkins" wrote:

snip
Sure, if you have the finesse to stop short of the pavement
underneath, or planned to repave it in the spring.


Many years ago I help an old girlfriends brother clear his driveway.
He had been driving over the snow and had solid pack maybe 8-10
inches
thick. We used his roto-tiller to loosen it up and then shovel off
the
debris. There was cement underneath. His idea/plan. It didn't work
too
bad. I wouldn't want to use my tiller though unless there was say
gravel underneath. An old set of tines would be best. I saw the
drive
once the snow was gone and you couldn't see any obvious damage. No
more
than tire chains would make.

--
Leon Fisk


I stopped using my home-made bucket loader to clear snow after it
knocked chunks of asphalt out of the edge of the driveway. It also
made a mess of the yard if the ground wasn't frozen solid before the
snow fell, i.e. the snow came with a cold front.

The skids on the edges of the bucket sank uselessly into the soft mud
that forms when the top layer of soil melts but can't drain through
the ice below it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rasputitsa


Some of the truck vids from Russia are showing triple tractors trying
to free lumber trucks from mudbeds. What a horrible mess that is.
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...sian+truck+mud

--
In order to become the master, the politician poses as the servant.
--Charles de Gaulle

  #35   Report Post  
Old February 16th 17, 04:32 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,673
Default Best drive belts?

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 23:35:54 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
. ..
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 13:33:41 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:


The consistency of the snowbank the road plows leave across the
driveway is somewhere between gravel and hard-frozen ice cream,
shading to wet concrete mix if it partly melts on a sunny day.
Guess
what that turns into at night.

Something just ripe for a pick mattock? Thot so.


Sure, if you have the finesse to stop short of the pavement
underneath, or planned to repave it in the spring.


One could use the reverse croquet stance, sir, as if hitting the
ball
back between one's legs, wot? Or how about the side strike,
splitting
the mound vertically so you could roll boulders of it to the side?


I've tried my winter climbing gear on a frozen snowbank.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_axe


Ah. I see. You -were- nuts, climbing up icicles. Eek!


It would have been the right tool to carve stair steps up and over
the
bank but was nowhere near enough to hack out a vehicle-sized
opening.


I hadn't even considered something that light and small to attack a
couple-foot thick mound of solid ice. Aren't they used for clearing
ice from crevices to insert expanders or set pitons?


It's sharper than a mattock since it doesn't strike rocks (much). It
can't be too sharp because the self-arrest technique if you slip is
to
hastily grab the wide blade (3) and force the long blade (1) down
into
the snow.


Sounds like great fun...for you. Enjoy. I very much prefer
snowless
areas.


Actually the ice and snow open up areas that are inacessible the rest
of the year. Lakes and streams become highways instead of
obstructions.




  #36   Report Post  
Old February 16th 17, 04:46 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,673
Default Best drive belts?

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 09:28:04 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Leon Fisk" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 23:35:54 -0500
"Jim Wilkins" wrote:

snip
Sure, if you have the finesse to stop short of the pavement
underneath, or planned to repave it in the spring.

Many years ago I help an old girlfriends brother clear his
driveway.
He had been driving over the snow and had solid pack maybe 8-10
inches
thick. We used his roto-tiller to loosen it up and then shovel off
the
debris. There was cement underneath. His idea/plan. It didn't work
too
bad. I wouldn't want to use my tiller though unless there was say
gravel underneath. An old set of tines would be best. I saw the
drive
once the snow was gone and you couldn't see any obvious damage. No
more
than tire chains would make.

--
Leon Fisk


I stopped using my home-made bucket loader to clear snow after it
knocked chunks of asphalt out of the edge of the driveway. It also
made a mess of the yard if the ground wasn't frozen solid before the
snow fell, i.e. the snow came with a cold front.

The skids on the edges of the bucket sank uselessly into the soft
mud
that forms when the top layer of soil melts but can't drain through
the ice below it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rasputitsa


Some of the truck vids from Russia are showing triple tractors
trying
to free lumber trucks from mudbeds. What a horrible mess that is.
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...sian+truck+mud


The off-road motorcycle club I belonged to ran springtime rallys
through all the mudholes. It was amazing to watch the Trials experts
on their Bultacos float over mud the less skilled of us were waist
deep in.
-jsw




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