Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old July 26th 15, 04:57 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Large anvils


Gunner Asch writes:

I got my Hay Budden for a handshake and an afternoon of chat.

I think its about 350lbs...35" heal to tip


I got my 305# Peter Wright, my main anvil for decades, from an antique
shop. The guy said, "Well, Mike, it's a dollar a pound and that looks
like a hunnert pounds to me." So I gave hin $100 and went home for
the truck. When we were duck-walking out to the door with it, me on
one end and him on the other, he muttered, "wheezegrunt This
weighs more than a hunnert pounds, don't it?"

But that was about 1978 and anvils are getting more scarce, the dollar
more worthless now.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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Old July 26th 15, 11:53 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Mike Spencer" wrote in message
...

Gunner Asch writes:

I got my Hay Budden for a handshake and an afternoon of chat.

I think its about 350lbs...35" heal to tip


I got my 305# Peter Wright, my main anvil for decades, from an
antique
shop. The guy said, "Well, Mike, it's a dollar a pound and that
looks
like a hunnert pounds to me." So I gave hin $100 and went home for
the truck. When we were duck-walking out to the door with it, me on
one end and him on the other, he muttered, "wheezegrunt This
weighs more than a hunnert pounds, don't it?"

But that was about 1978 and anvils are getting more scarce, the
dollar
more worthless now.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada


I have a Wilkin(son?) anvil that weighs 0-1-8, and has been entirely
adequate for my uses. What would one of that low weight have been
intended for?

-jsw


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Old July 26th 15, 09:36 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Sun, 26 Jul 2015 06:53:43 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Mike Spencer" wrote in message
...

Gunner Asch writes:

I got my Hay Budden for a handshake and an afternoon of chat.

I think its about 350lbs...35" heal to tip


I got my 305# Peter Wright, my main anvil for decades, from an
antique
shop. The guy said, "Well, Mike, it's a dollar a pound and that
looks
like a hunnert pounds to me." So I gave hin $100 and went home for
the truck. When we were duck-walking out to the door with it, me on
one end and him on the other, he muttered, "wheezegrunt This
weighs more than a hunnert pounds, don't it?"

But that was about 1978 and anvils are getting more scarce, the
dollar
more worthless now.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada


I have a Wilkin(son?) anvil that weighs 0-1-8, and has been entirely
adequate for my uses. What would one of that low weight have been
intended for?


0 tonne, 1 stone, 8 pence? Whassat?

--
My desire to be well-informed is currently
at odds with my desire to remain sane. --Sipkess
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Old July 26th 15, 09:38 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Sat, 25 Jul 2015 12:09:53 -0700, Gunner Asch
wrote:

On Sat, 25 Jul 2015 05:29:17 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Sat, 25 Jul 2015 03:29:34 -0700, Gunner Asch
wrote:

On 25 Jul 2015 00:35:39 -0300, Mike Spencer
wrote:


Ignoramus12512 writes:

You can easily sell good anvils (not cast iron and not ruined) for $3
per lb, they sell like hotcakes. Check ebay.

Yeah, just so. But it depends on who's selling. The last one I
bought, looks like a Peter Wright (but probably isn't), I got for half
that 3 or 4 years ago.

I got my Hay Budden for a handshake and an afternoon of chat.


Very Iggylike, sir. Kudos.


I think its about 350lbs...35" heal to tip


That will be a tough one to get in the back of my truck. bseg


That one will be used as my tombstone. Hopefully somewhere in the 22nd
century.


g Get my email?

--
My desire to be well-informed is currently
at odds with my desire to remain sane. --Sipkess
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Old July 26th 15, 10:37 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 26 Jul 2015 06:53:43 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Mike Spencer" wrote in message
...

Gunner Asch writes:

I got my Hay Budden for a handshake and an afternoon of chat.

I think its about 350lbs...35" heal to tip

I got my 305# Peter Wright, my main anvil for decades, from an
antique
shop. The guy said, "Well, Mike, it's a dollar a pound and that
looks
like a hunnert pounds to me." So I gave hin $100 and went home
for
the truck. When we were duck-walking out to the door with it, me
on
one end and him on the other, he muttered, "wheezegrunt This
weighs more than a hunnert pounds, don't it?"

But that was about 1978 and anvils are getting more scarce, the
dollar
more worthless now.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada


I have a Wilkin(son?) anvil that weighs 0-1-8, and has been entirely
adequate for my uses. What would one of that low weight have been
intended for?


0 tonne, 1 stone, 8 pence? Whassat?


You might find this website useful:
www.google.com





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Old July 26th 15, 11:00 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Sun, 26 Jul 2015 06:53:43 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Mike Spencer" wrote in message
...

Gunner Asch writes:

I got my Hay Budden for a handshake and an afternoon of chat.

I think its about 350lbs...35" heal to tip


I got my 305# Peter Wright, my main anvil for decades, from an
antique
shop. The guy said, "Well, Mike, it's a dollar a pound and that
looks
like a hunnert pounds to me." So I gave hin $100 and went home for
the truck. When we were duck-walking out to the door with it, me on
one end and him on the other, he muttered, "wheezegrunt This
weighs more than a hunnert pounds, don't it?"

But that was about 1978 and anvils are getting more scarce, the
dollar
more worthless now.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada


I have a Wilkin(son?) anvil that weighs 0-1-8, and has been entirely
adequate for my uses. What would one of that low weight have been
intended for?

-jsw

Small anvils are used for farrier work, general blacksmithing and
whatnot. Each size has a place. A farrier uses and avil up to about
80 lbs, because its all thats needed for making horseshoes and small
items, yet is still easily transported. A maker of heavy iron gates,
industrial fittings and so forth, would need a much bigger one..and be
working from a single location so would have no need for a "portable"
anvil. Then of course there are jewelers anvils, stake anvils etc
etc...

http://www.anvilfire.com/21centbs/Se...g-an-Anvil.php

http://www.anvilfire.com/anvils/

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Old July 26th 15, 11:09 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Sun, 26 Jul 2015 13:36:06 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Sun, 26 Jul 2015 06:53:43 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
wrote:

"Mike Spencer" wrote in message
...

Gunner Asch writes:

I got my Hay Budden for a handshake and an afternoon of chat.

I think its about 350lbs...35" heal to tip

I got my 305# Peter Wright, my main anvil for decades, from an
antique
shop. The guy said, "Well, Mike, it's a dollar a pound and that
looks
like a hunnert pounds to me." So I gave hin $100 and went home for
the truck. When we were duck-walking out to the door with it, me on
one end and him on the other, he muttered, "wheezegrunt This
weighs more than a hunnert pounds, don't it?"

But that was about 1978 and anvils are getting more scarce, the
dollar
more worthless now.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada


I have a Wilkin(son?) anvil that weighs 0-1-8, and has been entirely
adequate for my uses. What would one of that low weight have been
intended for?


0 tonne, 1 stone, 8 pence? Whassat?



http://www.anvilfire.com/article.php...Qs/anvil-6.htm

That would be a 9 lb anvil and it typically would be used for jewelry
work, small iron work and similar

I have a jewelers anvil that weighs about 1.5 lbs out in the oddments
in my shop. No idea who made it, or even where it was made. It was
terribly abused and is now sitting on a shelf somewhere out
there..never to be used again for some braindwarf to beat on with a
big hammer.

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Old July 27th 15, 12:10 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Large anvils



I have a Wilkin(son?) anvil that weighs 0-1-8,
and has been entirely
adequate for my uses. What would one of that low
weight have been
intended for?


0 tonne, 1 stone, 8 pence? Whassat?



0 hundredweights
1 quarter hundred
8 pounds

So, 33 lbs.....



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Old July 27th 15, 03:04 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Large anvils

On Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:10:32 -0400, "Phil Kangas"
wrote:



I have a Wilkin(son?) anvil that weighs 0-1-8,
and has been entirely
adequate for my uses. What would one of that low
weight have been
intended for?


0 tonne, 1 stone, 8 pence? Whassat?



0 hundredweights
1 quarter hundred
8 pounds

So, 33 lbs.....


Interesting. I'd never seen a Brit anvil weight before.

--
My desire to be well-informed is currently
at odds with my desire to remain sane. --Sipkess
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Old July 27th 15, 03:23 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Large anvils


"Jim Wilkins" writes:

I have a Wilkin(son?) anvil that weighs 0-1-8, and has been entirely
adequate for my uses. What would one of that low weight have been
intended for?


0 cwt + 1/4 cwt + 8 lbs where a cwt is 112 lbs. so 36 lbs.

Any light work or where portability was important. Sears & Roebuck
used to sell a kit of forge, anvil and vise for use on the farm. I
don't recall the details now. The anvil was rather small but maybe
not that small. Occasional shoeing, minor repairs, what a 1890s
farmer could do for himself. Nail making before cut and then wire
nails. Making small tools such as gravers, calipers or chisels.
Various riveting jobs, e.g draught harness repairs. Saw
setting. Anything light where a solid dinking surface was required.

Stake anvils with a longish stake ending in a spike, under 100#, were
made for carrying into the woods. The spike, driven into a stump,
anchored the anvil firmly enough for light forging and on-site repairs.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada


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