Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old June 14th 15, 12:50 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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The museum got a couple of gears cast. And that was good, but the hubs do not have any hole thru them. So need to drill a couple of holes thru the hubs. Not the easiest thing to do with the machinery available. I think the holes are
2 and 5/16th in diameter and maybe two inches in length.

I have a 20 inch drill press, but the gears are just over 27 inches in diameter. And the drill press at the museum is smaller. Fortunately the gears are spoked. So one plan is to take the head off the drill press, put the gear on the base with the column going up between the spokes. And put the head back on the drill press. Sometimes you just have to make do with what you have.

So have been thinking about anular cutters. Maybe getting one off Ebay. A brief look finds most of them will not make a hole two inches long. So that could involve cutting from both sides. Which is of course a PITA because you have to flip the gear over.

I have never used an anular cutter but have some suspicions. I expect anular cutters do not work well in a portable drill. It would be nice to drill using a portable drill and then flip the gear over and drill from the other side. And get a fair sized hole thru the gear hub before putting it on the drill press.

So is that possible, practical? Or is it a sure way to get beaten to death by the portable drill when it hangs up?

The other question is would it be worthwhile to use a anular cutter in the drill press and cut from both sides. Yeah that is a judgement call, but what is your opinion.

Yes the gears should have cores in the hubs, but they did not.

One last thought is to drill a relatively small hole thru the hub and enlarge it using a cutting torch and finish on the drill press.

Dan












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Old June 14th 15, 01:07 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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wrote:
The museum got a couple of gears cast. And that was good, but the
hubs do not have any hole thru them. So need to drill a couple of
holes thru the hubs. Not the easiest thing to do with the machinery
available. I think the holes are 2 and 5/16th in diameter and maybe
two inches in length.

I have a 20 inch drill press, but the gears are just over 27 inches
in diameter. And the drill press at the museum is smaller.
Fortunately the gears are spoked. So one plan is to take the head
off the drill press, put the gear on the base with the column going
up between the spokes. And put the head back on the drill press.
Sometimes you just have to make do with what you have.

So have been thinking about anular cutters. Maybe getting one off
Ebay. A brief look finds most of them will not make a hole two
inches long. So that could involve cutting from both sides. Which
is of course a PITA because you have to flip the gear over.

I have never used an anular cutter but have some suspicions. I
expect anular cutters do not work well in a portable drill. It would
be nice to drill using a portable drill and then flip the gear over
and drill from the other side. And get a fair sized hole thru the
gear hub before putting it on the drill press.

So is that possible, practical? Or is it a sure way to get beaten
to death by the portable drill when it hangs up?

The other question is would it be worthwhile to use a anular cutter
in the drill press and cut from both sides. Yeah that is a judgement
call, but what is your opinion.

Yes the gears should have cores in the hubs, but they did not.

One last thought is to drill a relatively small hole thru the hub
and enlarge it using a cutting torch and finish on the drill press.

Dan


drill it as far as you can then toss a boring bar in the drill press. IF
the press is even close to being a good one it should be able to handle
light cuts. OR Depending on the location you might be able to find a guy
with a mill in the garage that would do it for reasonable.

--
Steve W.
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Old June 14th 15, 02:00 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Sat, 13 Jun 2015 16:50:07 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:


The museum got a couple of gears cast. And that was good, but the hubs do not have any hole thru them. So need to drill a couple of holes thru the hubs. Not the easiest thing to do with the machinery available. I think the holes are
2 and 5/16th in diameter and maybe two inches in length.

I have a 20 inch drill press, but the gears are just over 27 inches in diameter. And the drill press at the museum is smaller. Fortunately the gears are spoked. So one plan is to take the head off the drill press, put the gear on the base with the column going up between the spokes. And put the head back on the drill press. Sometimes you just have to make do with what you have.

So have been thinking about anular cutters. Maybe getting one off Ebay. A brief look finds most of them will not make a hole two inches long. So that could involve cutting from both sides. Which is of course a PITA because you have to flip the gear over.

I have never used an anular cutter but have some suspicions. I expect anular cutters do not work well in a portable drill. It would be nice to drill using a portable drill and then flip the gear over and drill from the other side. And get a fair sized hole thru the gear hub before putting it on the drill press.

So is that possible, practical? Or is it a sure way to get beaten to death by the portable drill when it hangs up?

The other question is would it be worthwhile to use a anular cutter in the drill press and cut from both sides. Yeah that is a judgement call, but what is your opinion.

Yes the gears should have cores in the hubs, but they did not.

One last thought is to drill a relatively small hole thru the hub and enlarge it using a cutting torch and finish on the drill press.

Dan


If worst comes to worst..borrow a mag drill and a make or borrow a
bit. Spade drill will work "ok"

Really though..to do this right..you need to find someone who has a
radial arm drill press. They come in all sizes. I was using one with a
12' arm yesterday.but they do come smaller

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cincinnati-B...-/131496197217

https://picasaweb.google.com/1040422...98444366850722

https://picasaweb.google.com/1040422...45910021038594

If you are doing a lot of machine restoration of bigger parts...Id
hunt around until I found a radial arm drill press big enough to do
the work.

Keep in mind that you are going to need to do a very accurate job of
layout..so finding a lathe with a 36" swing would be optimal as well.
Put the gear blank in a 4 jaw chuck and then run in a pilot and then
finish with spade drill.. follow up with a reamer or good accurate
finish turn

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-NEW-1-13-1...-/331581513335

Now you could..could make a base for your drill press head and
column..and clamp it to the top of your gear and drill it that way.
Magnetic drills work easier though if you can borrow one.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Milwaukee-Ma...l/271726734290

I have to use them regularly

https://picasaweb.google.com/1040422...47823891262210

Frankly..Id find a shop in your area with a big mill or radial arm
drill and have them pop the hole. Given its a non profit..you can
probably get the work donated.


Gunner
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Old June 14th 15, 12:04 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Gunner Asch" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 13 Jun 2015 16:50:07 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:


Now you could..could make a base for your drill press head and
column..and clamp it to the top of your gear and drill it that way.
Magnetic drills work easier though if you can borrow one.

Gunner


I just turn the head around on the column and clamp the base to the
work. I filed off the shoulder in the head that the column rests on so
I can slide it down closer to the base.

I've bored a 3" hole in steel with a hole saw in a large, slow
Milwaukee hand drill. The accuracy wasn't good enough for a bearing,
but if the pilot hole was properly located it would get you close
enough to finish the bore with a jury-rigged line boring bar in pillow
blocks.

-jsw




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