Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old June 12th 15, 05:44 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Sheet Metal Choices

I need to make some enclosures, and splash guards for some of my machines.
I've got a tensmith brake That will handle upto about .100 mild steel. I've
done .125 5052 (annealed partway through), but its really to much for the
machine.

Anyway, I really haven't done much sheet metal work other than crude light
stuff.

I'm wondering what alloy and gage is going to give me good fairly rigid
results at the best (not necessarily cheapest) cost. I know that's a huge
over general basis to start with, but I really do not have enough general
knowledge of sheet metal work to ask the right questions.






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Old June 12th 15, 05:57 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Sheet Metal Choices

"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
...
I need to make some enclosures, and splash guards for some of my
machines. I've got a tensmith brake That will handle upto about .100
mild steel. I've done .125 5052 (annealed partway through), but its
really to much for the machine.

Anyway, I really haven't done much sheet metal work other than crude
light stuff.

I'm wondering what alloy and gage is going to give me good fairly
rigid results at the best (not necessarily cheapest) cost. I know
that's a huge over general basis to start with, but I really do not
have enough general knowledge of sheet metal work to ask the right
questions.


The standard aluminum sheet at several places I worked was 0.062"
6061. WW2 heavy bombers were made from thinner metal, like 0.040".

Flanges on the edges makes panels -much- stiffer. For electronic
enclosures we rarely welded the corners unless they had to be
RF-tight.

If the panel had to support a 40 lb transformer it might be 0.093"
thick.

I bought 0.050" 5052 to shear on my 30" 3-in-1 because 0.062 6061
strains it.

-jsw


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Old June 12th 15, 06:43 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Sheet Metal Choices

On Friday, June 12, 2015 at 12:41:09 PM UTC-4, Bob La Londe wrote:

I'm wondering what alloy and gage is going to give me good fairly rigid
results at the best (not necessarily cheapest) cost. I know that's a huge
over general basis to start with, but I really do not have enough general
knowledge of sheet metal work to ask the right questions.


First the alloy is not doing to change the stiffness.

I would use aluminum. Does not rust and easier to bend.
Second choice would be galvanized sheet metal as used for heating ducts. Does not rust for a long time and is cheaper.

And I would pop rivet it together. And would stiffen it up by adding some angles on the inside edges where they will not show. And on the inside of any large flat pieces.

Dan



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Old June 12th 15, 07:02 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Sheet Metal Choices

On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 09:44:59 -0700, "Bob La Londe"
wrote:

I need to make some enclosures, and splash guards for some of my machines.
I've got a tensmith brake That will handle upto about .100 mild steel. I've
done .125 5052 (annealed partway through), but its really to much for the
machine.

Anyway, I really haven't done much sheet metal work other than crude light
stuff.

I'm wondering what alloy and gage is going to give me good fairly rigid
results at the best (not necessarily cheapest) cost. I know that's a huge
over general basis to start with, but I really do not have enough general
knowledge of sheet metal work to ask the right questions.




When I make sheet metal splash and chip guards for my machines I use
either aluminum about 1/16 thick or galvanized steel about 1/2 to 1/4
as thick as the aluminum. The thicker stuff I use for large
unsupported areas. I have made several box like enclosures over the
years that were no more than 12 inches in any dimension out of thin
galvanized sheet bought at the hardware store. I like the stuff
because it is soft and easy to bend and it doesn't need paint for
corrosion protection and is real easy to solder with plain old
plumbing solder and flux. I'm pretty it is intended for making custom
ductwork or for making modifications to stock ductwork. I hope it is
because I have done just that a few times.
Eric

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Old June 15th 15, 03:00 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Sheet Metal Choices

On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 11:02:34 -0700, wrote:

On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 09:44:59 -0700, "Bob La Londe"
wrote:

I need to make some enclosures, and splash guards for some of my machines.
I've got a tensmith brake That will handle upto about .100 mild steel. I've
done .125 5052 (annealed partway through), but its really to much for the
machine.

Anyway, I really haven't done much sheet metal work other than crude light
stuff.

I'm wondering what alloy and gage is going to give me good fairly rigid
results at the best (not necessarily cheapest) cost. I know that's a huge
over general basis to start with, but I really do not have enough general
knowledge of sheet metal work to ask the right questions.




When I make sheet metal splash and chip guards for my machines I use
either aluminum about 1/16 thick or galvanized steel about 1/2 to 1/4
as thick as the aluminum. The thicker stuff I use for large
unsupported areas. I have made several box like enclosures over the
years that were no more than 12 inches in any dimension out of thin
galvanized sheet bought at the hardware store. I like the stuff
because it is soft and easy to bend and it doesn't need paint for
corrosion protection and is real easy to solder with plain old
plumbing solder and flux. I'm pretty it is intended for making custom
ductwork or for making modifications to stock ductwork. I hope it is
because I have done just that a few times.
Eric

I have been known to make small items from aluminium pop cans opened
up and flattened, then held in place with a magnet. They aren't
substantial enough to cause problems if a disaster should occur. For
more durable items
i call upon my supply of salvaged furnace duct or reclaimed al. dryer
ducting. Whatever I can lay my hands on, even sheet plexiglass.
---

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada


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