Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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  #31   Report Post  
Old February 26th 17, 03:33 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

On Saturday, February 25, 2017 at 4:47:26 PM UTC-5, Larry Jaques wrote:
On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 07:47:46 -0600, Pete Keillor
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 18:55:40 -0800, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:27:12 -0500, wrote:

On Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:18:36 -0600, Frnak McKenney
wrote:

On Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 2:55:59 PM UTC-5, Jon Elson wrote:
wrote:


Has anyone here ever seen this problem? My cousing said it might be
related to washing the knives in a dishwasher, but only about a
quarter of the knives seem to be affected.


Check this site out if you need a high temperature cement.
http://www.sauereisen.com/ceramic-as...product-index/

That's probably a really pricy hi-tech goo.

Don't know about price, but it's been around a long time. I used it
at work in the '70's. Hmmm. 4 oz. for $13 for one type. I remember


That's not bad at all, but was that the price then or now? I figured
it was probably like some of the new epoxies at $200+ per oz.


it being very hard, but was tough, didn't crack even under heat
cycling in a furnace. I'd have to look at the literature to decide if
any of their products would work for the knives. Seems overqualified
for the heat part, don't know about the moisture and adhesion needs.


As an avid (compulsive?) tool user all my life, I tend to opt toward
anything which is more toward the side of user-friendly and ergonomic.
Flexible adhesive gel between the parts of table utensils seem to fit
so that's why I thought about the Goos. Love 'em, I do. I had the
sole of a high-top hiking boot come loose at the toe (5" worth!) once
and it flapped down and bent under on my trek. A piece of string held
it together until I got back to the truck. At home, I rinsed the joint
with water, patted them dry, and left them to dry thoroughly, then
applied some Shoe Goo to the halves, stuck them together, opened them
up to tack them for a minute, then stuck them together and put a spare
patio tile on it. It was good as new later that day and they lasted
several more years. I invested $20 in Plumber's & Shoe Goos plus
E6000 20 or so years ago and saved maybe $1k in replacement parts by
being able to repair the breaks once and for all.

--
In order to become the master, the politician poses as the servant.
--Charles de Gaulle


Flexible things like shoe soles do just fine with the shrinkage of solvent-born adhesives. Solid, non-yielding things like knife blades and metal handles, which can't even move relative to each other as the adhesive dries, fare less well. The adhesive either pulls away from one or both surfaces you're trying to glue, or it fails in the bulk of the adhesive, tearing itself apart.

Use epoxy for this job.

--
Ed Huntress

  #32   Report Post  
Old February 26th 17, 12:02 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 321
Default Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 13:47:47 -0800, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 07:47:46 -0600, Pete Keillor
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 18:55:40 -0800, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:27:12 -0500, wrote:

On Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:18:36 -0600, Frnak McKenney
wrote:

On Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 2:55:59 PM UTC-5, Jon Elson wrote:
wrote:


Has anyone here ever seen this problem? My cousing said it might be
related to washing the knives in a dishwasher, but only about a
quarter of the knives seem to be affected.


Check this site out if you need a high temperature cement.
http://www.sauereisen.com/ceramic-as...product-index/

That's probably a really pricy hi-tech goo.

Don't know about price, but it's been around a long time. I used it
at work in the '70's. Hmmm. 4 oz. for $13 for one type. I remember


That's not bad at all, but was that the price then or now? I figured
it was probably like some of the new epoxies at $200+ per oz.

Damn, Larry, my memory is nowhere near that good. That's current.

snip
  #33   Report Post  
Old February 26th 17, 01:16 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2016
Posts: 338
Default Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

On Saturday, February 25, 2017 at 4:47:26 PM UTC-5, Larry Jaques wrote:
On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 07:47:46 -0600, Pete Keillor
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 18:55:40 -0800, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:27:12 -0500, wrote:

On Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:18:36 -0600, Frnak McKenney
wrote:

On Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 2:55:59 PM UTC-5, Jon Elson wrote:
wrote:


Has anyone here ever seen this problem? My cousing said it might be
related to washing the knives in a dishwasher, but only about a
quarter of the knives seem to be affected.


Check this site out if you need a high temperature cement.
http://www.sauereisen.com/ceramic-as...product-index/

That's probably a really pricy hi-tech goo.

Don't know about price, but it's been around a long time. I used it
at work in the '70's. Hmmm. 4 oz. for $13 for one type. I remember


That's not bad at all, but was that the price then or now? I figured
it was probably like some of the new epoxies at $200+ per oz.


it being very hard, but was tough, didn't crack even under heat
cycling in a furnace. I'd have to look at the literature to decide if
any of their products would work for the knives. Seems overqualified
for the heat part, don't know about the moisture and adhesion needs.


As an avid (compulsive?) tool user all my life, I tend to opt toward
anything which is more toward the side of user-friendly and ergonomic.
Flexible adhesive gel between the parts of table utensils seem to fit
so that's why I thought about the Goos. Love 'em, I do. I had the
sole of a high-top hiking boot come loose at the toe (5" worth!) once
and it flapped down and bent under on my trek. A piece of string held
it together until I got back to the truck. At home, I rinsed the joint
with water, patted them dry, and left them to dry thoroughly, then
applied some Shoe Goo to the halves, stuck them together, opened them
up to tack them for a minute, then stuck them together and put a spare
patio tile on it. It was good as new later that day and they lasted
several more years. I invested $20 in Plumber's & Shoe Goos plus
E6000 20 or so years ago and saved maybe $1k in replacement parts by
being able to repair the breaks once and for all.


Yes, liquid nails, bondo with fiberglass and the myriad of stuff like that are great just as long as you clean and rinse both surfaces.
  #34   Report Post  
Old February 26th 17, 03:36 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

On Sun, 26 Feb 2017 06:02:30 -0600, Pete Keillor
wrote:

On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 13:47:47 -0800, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 07:47:46 -0600, Pete Keillor
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 18:55:40 -0800, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:27:12 -0500, wrote:

On Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:18:36 -0600, Frnak McKenney
wrote:

On Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 2:55:59 PM UTC-5, Jon Elson wrote:
wrote:


Has anyone here ever seen this problem? My cousing said it might be
related to washing the knives in a dishwasher, but only about a
quarter of the knives seem to be affected.


Check this site out if you need a high temperature cement.
http://www.sauereisen.com/ceramic-as...product-index/

That's probably a really pricy hi-tech goo.

Don't know about price, but it's been around a long time. I used it
at work in the '70's. Hmmm. 4 oz. for $13 for one type. I remember


That's not bad at all, but was that the price then or now? I figured
it was probably like some of the new epoxies at $200+ per oz.

Damn, Larry, my memory is nowhere near that good. That's current.


g

And even the expensive goo doesn't work well when you don't follow the
instructions. (See Boston Big Dig Collapse for more info)

--
Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling.
-- Margaret Lee Runbeck
  #35   Report Post  
Old March 14th 17, 07:27 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 338
Default Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

On Saturday, February 25, 2017 at 4:47:26 PM UTC-5, Larry Jaques wrote:
- hide quoted text -
On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 07:47:46 -0600, Pete Keillor
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 18:55:40 -0800, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:27:12 -0500, wrote:

On Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:18:36 -0600, Frnak McKenney
wrote:

On Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 2:55:59 PM UTC-5, Jon Elson wrote:
wrote:


Has anyone here ever seen this problem? My cousing said it might be
related to washing the knives in a dishwasher, but only about a
quarter of the knives seem to be affected.


Check this site out if you need a high temperature cement.
http://www.sauereisen.com/ceramic-as...product-index/

That's probably a really pricy hi-tech goo.

Don't know about price, but it's been around a long time. I used it
at work in the '70's. Hmmm. 4 oz. for $13 for one type. I remember


That's not bad at all, but was that the price then or now? I figured
it was probably like some of the new epoxies at $200+ per oz.


it being very hard, but was tough, didn't crack even under heat
cycling in a furnace. I'd have to look at the literature to decide if
any of their products would work for the knives. Seems overqualified
for the heat part, don't know about the moisture and adhesion needs.


As an avid (compulsive?) tool user all my life, I tend to opt toward
anything which is more toward the side of user-friendly and ergonomic.
Flexible adhesive gel between the parts of table utensils seem to fit
so that's why I thought about the Goos. Love 'em, I do. I had the
sole of a high-top hiking boot come loose at the toe (5" worth!) once
and it flapped down and bent under on my trek. A piece of string held
it together until I got back to the truck. At home, I rinsed the joint
with water, patted them dry, and left them to dry thoroughly, then
applied some Shoe Goo to the halves, stuck them together, opened them
up to tack them for a minute, then stuck them together and put a spare
patio tile on it. It was good as new later that day and they lasted
several more years. I invested $20 in Plumber's & Shoe Goos plus
E6000 20 or so years ago and saved maybe $1k in replacement parts by
being able to repair the breaks once and for all.


Maybe I was wrong. A hot glue gun heats up stuff that you can put on your boots to keep them together. (higher melting point)


  #36   Report Post  
Old February 3rd 18, 05:55 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

On Tuesday, December 31, 2013 at 2:01:27 PM UTC-8, Frnak McKenney wrote:
Are metal-related questions still allowed here? grin!

Christmas brunch was wonderful. My sister and I were invited to eat
with a cousin and her family, and the French Toast -- made with slices
of French bread and peach butter -- was delicious.

As we sat around the table afterwards, one topic that came up was the
odd look of their stainless tableware, or to be more specific, the
knives. These were made by a company named Gorham (Fairview pattern?)
and had given wonderful service for many years, but recently they had
noticed that some of the knives were "separating": the blade had begun
to separate from the handle, showing a minor gap of roughly 1/8".

Hoping for a simple fix, I spent a couple of hours exploring the 'Web
with different combinations of keywords looking for instructions like
"heat to 400degF for 10 minutes and the epoxy will soften, then gently
press the blade back into the handle and it will be as god as new for
another decade or two". Nope. Most of what I found related to
stainless blades set into sterling handles (not the case here), and
there were more descriptions of how to tear the handle off and sell
the sterling than ideas of how to repair a knife.

Has anyone here ever seen this problem? My cousing said it might be
related to washing the knives in a dishwasher, but only about a
quarter of the knives seem to be affected.

Does anyone know how I could learn about the properties of the "epoxy"
(an assumption, the term pops up a lot)?

It's not a life-or-death problem, but if anyone has any suggestions I
would appreciate hearing from you.

Thanks. And a Happy New Year and a Euphorious Epiphany to all!


Frank McKenney
--
A man who has faith must be prepared not only to be a martyr, but to
be a fool. It is absurd to say that a man is ready to toil and die
for his convictions when he is not even ready to wear a wreath for
them. -- G.K. Chesterton: Christmas and the Aesthetes (1905)
--
Frank McKenney, McKenney Associates
Richmond, Virginia / (804) 320-4887
Munged E-mail: frank uscore mckenney aatt mindspring ddoott com


I have exactly the same problem. Did you ever find an answer?
Rex Olsen

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Old December 27th 18, 04:52 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

I know your post about Gorham knives was a while ago, but did you ever find a solution to your knives separating? I also have a few that have separated and would like to figure out how to fix them.
  #38   Report Post  
Old December 27th 18, 05:23 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Stainless steel, epoxy, and tableware

On Thursday, December 27, 2018 at 11:52:33 AM UTC-5, wrote:
I know your post about Gorham knives was a while ago, but did you ever find a solution to your knives separating? I also have a few that have separated and would like to figure out how to fix them.


A good grade of epoxy adhesive should do it. Don't use the quick-acting stuff; it's not very waterproof and some of it won't handle the 140 deg. F or so it will face in a dishwasher.

Good epoxy will tolerate over 220 deg. F.

--
Ed Huntress
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