Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 06:59 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Apr 2007
Posts: 3,138
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

On Mon, 22 Nov 2010 18:06:46 -0500, "Phil Kangas"
wrote:



I can't take it anymore, yes you paint the sucker!
Use high heat
black in a rattle can and put it on heavy. Then
set it up outside
and put a big hot fire in it, really hot, kiln
dried maple is best.
Then it won't stink anymore and it won't end up
looking like a
chunk of crappy looking scrap iron. And don't be
afraid to fire
it up hot on a regular basis too! If you're the
type who is afraid
of a hot stove with flames halfway up the chimney
you have no
business burning wood. Cold, smoldering, smoky
fires are no
good, they are creosote makers asking for trouble.
The inside
of the stove should be snow white!
While we're on the subject, another thing that
gets me going
are top benches too low! The code inspector says
they cannot
be any higher than what was decided upon by a
panel of ignorant
beaurocrates who don't know ****. How are you
supposed to
put your feet on the ceiling with a top bench that
freaking low?
And one more thing, just one: rough cut cedar
benches rule!
Rough cut, as in fresh off the circular saw, three
inches thick
and ten inches wide is about right. Two side by
side on top,
one loner in the middle and two side by side for
the lower.
phil kangas


Note to Rashid: Kangas is a Finnish name. Saunas are Finnish. Listen
up!

Foreman is not a Finnish name, but my maternal grandparents both came
from Finland. The name was Suuronen but Grampa changed that to Sirola
because nobody here could pronounce Suuronen correctly. My middle name
is Sirola.

I've never built a sauna stove so I'll defer to Phil on that. I
rather doubt that they had high-temp paint in rattlecans in Finland
circa 1900, but it may well be a good approach in 2010.

  #12   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 08:22 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2010
Posts: 10,298
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 00:59:46 -0600, Don Foreman
wrote:

On Mon, 22 Nov 2010 18:06:46 -0500, "Phil Kangas"
wrote:



I can't take it anymore, yes you paint the sucker!
Use high heat
black in a rattle can and put it on heavy. Then
set it up outside
and put a big hot fire in it, really hot, kiln
dried maple is best.
Then it won't stink anymore and it won't end up
looking like a
chunk of crappy looking scrap iron. And don't be
afraid to fire
it up hot on a regular basis too! If you're the
type who is afraid
of a hot stove with flames halfway up the chimney
you have no
business burning wood. Cold, smoldering, smoky
fires are no
good, they are creosote makers asking for trouble.
The inside
of the stove should be snow white!
While we're on the subject, another thing that
gets me going
are top benches too low! The code inspector says
they cannot
be any higher than what was decided upon by a
panel of ignorant
beaurocrates who don't know ****. How are you
supposed to
put your feet on the ceiling with a top bench that
freaking low?
And one more thing, just one: rough cut cedar
benches rule!
Rough cut, as in fresh off the circular saw, three
inches thick
and ten inches wide is about right. Two side by
side on top,
one loner in the middle and two side by side for
the lower.
phil kangas


Note to Rashid: Kangas is a Finnish name. Saunas are Finnish. Listen
up!

Foreman is not a Finnish name, but my maternal grandparents both came
from Finland. The name was Suuronen but Grampa changed that to Sirola
because nobody here could pronounce Suuronen correctly. My middle name
is Sirola.

I've never built a sauna stove so I'll defer to Phil on that. I
rather doubt that they had high-temp paint in rattlecans in Finland
circa 1900, but it may well be a good approach in 2010.


My family name on that side is Ojala.

Much simpler G

Took me a few seconds to be able to say Suuronen. Its been a while.

Piva!!

Gunner

--
"Confiscating wealth from those who have earned it, inherited it,
or got lucky is never going to help 'the poor.' Poverty isn't
caused by some people having more money than others, just as obesity
isn't caused by McDonald's serving super-sized orders of French fries
Poverty, like obesity, is caused by the life choices that dictate
results." - John Tucci,
  #13   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 11:01 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2009
Posts: 13
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 00:59:46 -0600, Don Foreman
wrote:

On Mon, 22 Nov 2010 18:06:46 -0500, "Phil Kangas"
wrote:



I can't take it anymore, yes you paint the sucker!
Use high heat
black in a rattle can and put it on heavy. Then
set it up outside
and put a big hot fire in it, really hot, kiln
dried maple is best.
Then it won't stink anymore and it won't end up
looking like a
chunk of crappy looking scrap iron. And don't be
afraid to fire
it up hot on a regular basis too! If you're the
type who is afraid
of a hot stove with flames halfway up the chimney
you have no
business burning wood. Cold, smoldering, smoky
fires are no
good, they are creosote makers asking for trouble.
The inside
of the stove should be snow white!
While we're on the subject, another thing that
gets me going
are top benches too low! The code inspector says
they cannot
be any higher than what was decided upon by a
panel of ignorant
beaurocrates who don't know ****. How are you
supposed to
put your feet on the ceiling with a top bench that
freaking low?
And one more thing, just one: rough cut cedar
benches rule!
Rough cut, as in fresh off the circular saw, three
inches thick
and ten inches wide is about right. Two side by
side on top,
one loner in the middle and two side by side for
the lower.
phil kangas


Note to Rashid: Kangas is a Finnish name. Saunas are Finnish. Listen
up!

Foreman is not a Finnish name, but my maternal grandparents both came
from Finland. The name was Suuronen but Grampa changed that to Sirola
because nobody here could pronounce Suuronen correctly. My middle name
is Sirola.

I've never built a sauna stove so I'll defer to Phil on that. I
rather doubt that they had high-temp paint in rattlecans in Finland
circa 1900, but it may well be a good approach in 2010.



Never been to Finland but my granddad used some stuff he called "stove
polish" every fall when it started to get cold. I think it was a waxy
substance that you just smeared on with a brush, not an actual paint.

Cheers,

Brice
  #14   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 01:23 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 24
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

Folx,

all the advice is much appreciated !

I am rather aware of the rich history between Finland & USSR, but it's
been long over by now , so let's move on.
Besides, in the tsarist Russia, Finland was effectively a self-
governed territory and didn't do that bad at all

I am sure Russian "banya"/ "parilka" (steam room) is as old as Finnish
sauna. The chief difference we

- the method use to heat up the rocks (in traditional Russian design,
they were exposed to direct flame - thus the name "chernaya" (black)
- Finns like dry heat, Russians splash water onto the hot rocks to get
copious amts of steam into the air

Both enjoy the distinct technique of staying in till you can not take
it no more and then, running out buck naked and dipping into a ice-
covered lake or a snow drift . In the summer, you'd always have few
buckets of coldest water one can get. The thermal shock is most
beneficial to human body/skin & spirit

My main concern had to do with the water being splashed onto the
exterior and creating some rust. I guess I am being paranoid here and
having no paint is just fine

While on it:

Is 1/8 HRS good nuff ? Should I use 3/18" ?

About the inside of the oven - are any liners (bricks) etc used - or
fire burn right on the exposed metal ?

Thanks again !
  #15   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 06:54 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,783
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 05:23:38 -0800 (PST), rashid111
wrote:

Folx,

all the advice is much appreciated !

I am rather aware of the rich history between Finland & USSR, but it's
been long over by now , so let's move on.
Besides, in the tsarist Russia, Finland was effectively a self-
governed territory and didn't do that bad at all

I am sure Russian "banya"/ "parilka" (steam room) is as old as Finnish
sauna. The chief difference we

- the method use to heat up the rocks (in traditional Russian design,
they were exposed to direct flame - thus the name "chernaya" (black)
- Finns like dry heat, Russians splash water onto the hot rocks to get
copious amts of steam into the air

Both enjoy the distinct technique of staying in till you can not take
it no more and then, running out buck naked and dipping into a ice-
covered lake or a snow drift . In the summer, you'd always have few
buckets of coldest water one can get. The thermal shock is most
beneficial to human body/skin & spirit

My main concern had to do with the water being splashed onto the
exterior and creating some rust. I guess I am being paranoid here and
having no paint is just fine


As Phil said, the paints I mentioned early in the thread are not a
problem. My woodstove is painted with the stuff and sits right between
our kitchen and living room. The fire never goes out from Dec to March
and there's absolutely no odor. The stove paint is made up with very
volatile solvents and stinks like hell while it's being applied and
when the stove is first fired, but the volatiles flash off very
quickly.

Stove polish is not the same thing as stove paint, and works much
better on cast iron than on steel.


While on it:

Is 1/8 HRS good nuff ? Should I use 3/18" ?

About the inside of the oven - are any liners (bricks) etc used - or
fire burn right on the exposed metal ?


A firebrick or fireclay lining will protect the steel from corrosion
and, to some extent, warping. But it'll also increase the time it
takes for the outside of the stove to warm up. Depending on the
design, I probably wouldn't line a sauna stove.

Steel is cheap and a heavy steel stove is less likely to warp.

--
Ned Simmons


  #16   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 07:52 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,065
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

rashid111 on Tue, 23 Nov 2010 05:23:38
-0800 (PST) typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

Both enjoy the distinct technique of staying in till you can not take
it no more and then, running out buck naked and dipping into a ice-
covered lake or a snow drift . In the summer, you'd always have few
buckets of coldest water one can get. The thermal shock is most
beneficial to human body/skin & spirit

My main concern had to do with the water being splashed onto the
exterior and creating some rust. I guess I am being paranoid here and
having no paint is just fine


If the water dries completely (and quickly), it is not going to
get a lot of rust. But the issue isn't so much what you can see, but
the places in back and "underneath" where water can collect,
particularly between uses.

tschus
pyotr

--
pyotr filipivich
We will drink no whiskey before its nine.
It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
  #17   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 08:01 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,065
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

Ned Simmons on Tue, 23 Nov 2010 13:54:13 -0500 typed
in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:


About the inside of the oven - are any liners (bricks) etc used - or
fire burn right on the exposed metal ?


At a minimum, I would suggest a grate to hold the wood up off the
floor. Of course, after the first fire, you will have the ashes to
serve as insulation/protection of the bottom of the firebox.

A firebrick or fireclay lining will protect the steel from corrosion
and, to some extent, warping. But it'll also increase the time it
takes for the outside of the stove to warm up. Depending on the
design, I probably wouldn't line a sauna stove.


Put the brick on the bottom - that will protect the bottom from
fire. Iron does oxidize. Lining the sides with firebrick will serve
as thermal mass to moderate the extremes of hot/cold as the fire
flares up and burns down. It may take a while to heat the sauna to
proper temps, but it will also take longer for it to cool off, so you
do not have to jump up and stoke the fire.

Steel is cheap and a heavy steel stove is less likely to warp.


That too. There is the issue of over building - heavier steel
will mean that it will be longer till you have to repair or replace.


I don't have experience with sauna specific wood stoves, but did
work for a while making "regular" wood burning stoves for heating. I
think we used a 3/8 plate for the box (it was about "that thick" -
holding fingers about a quarter inch apart).

tschus
pyotr
--
pyotr filipivich
We will drink no whiskey before its nine.
It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
  #18   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 10:46 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 218
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove


rashid111 on Tue, 23 Nov 2010 05:23:38
-0800 (PST) typed in rec.crafts.metalworking
the following:

Both enjoy the distinct technique of staying in
till you can not take
it no more and then, running out buck naked
and dipping into a ice-
covered lake or a snow drift . In the summer,
you'd always have few
buckets of coldest water one can get. The
thermal shock is most
beneficial to human body/skin & spirit


Sauna:
Get stove hot
Get sauna hot
Get naked
Get in sauna
Get you wet
Get bench wet
Get on bench
Get stove wet
Get hot
Get dizzy
Get out!



  #19   Report Post  
Old November 23rd 10, 11:31 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,507
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

Phil Kangas wrote:
rashid111 on Tue, 23 Nov 2010 05:23:38

Both enjoy the distinct technique of staying in
till you can not take
it no more and then, running out buck naked
and dipping into a ice-
covered lake or a snow drift . In the summer,
you'd always have few
buckets of coldest water one can get. The
thermal shock is most
beneficial to human body/skin & spirit


Sauna:
Get stove hot
Get sauna hot
Get naked
Get in sauna
Get you wet
Get bench wet
Get on bench
Get stove wet
Get hot
Get dizzy
Get out!


For full effect, beat self with willow branches and jump through hole in
lake ice.

Cheers!
Rich

  #20   Report Post  
Old November 24th 10, 12:18 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,065
Default Fabricating a sauna wood burning stove

"Phil Kangas" on Tue, 23 Nov 2010 17:46:23
-0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

rashid111 on Tue, 23 Nov 2010 05:23:38
-0800 (PST) typed in rec.crafts.metalworking
the following:

Both enjoy the distinct technique of staying in
till you can not take
it no more and then, running out buck naked
and dipping into a ice-
covered lake or a snow drift . In the summer,
you'd always have few
buckets of coldest water one can get. The
thermal shock is most
beneficial to human body/skin & spirit


Sauna:
Get stove hot
Get sauna hot
Get naked
Get in sauna
Get you wet
Get bench wet
Get on bench
Get stove wet
Get hot
Get dizzy
Get out!


Ja, that will work.


--
pyotr filipivich
We will drink no whiskey before its nine.
It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I need to put out wood burning stove? spj_uk Home Ownership 2 October 30th 06 03:46 PM
wood burning stove John Kelly UK diy 7 October 13th 06 03:01 PM
wood burning stove [email protected] UK diy 2 April 24th 05 05:28 AM
Wood burning stove PacKat Home Repair 3 December 21st 04 02:16 PM
Wood burning stove Martin Carroll UK diy 4 October 12th 03 08:44 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:47 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017