Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old May 12th 10, 06:50 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!

I was just replacing our dishwasher with a new one, and I noticed
something...

First off let me tell you in the past I have always swapped stuff like this
myself, but when we moved into this house we were just too busy and I didn't
have time to do everything. I let my wife hire a plumber to install the
dishwasher we brought from the old house and move her fancy toilets.

Anyway, I pulled the compression nut off the water supply line and it was
wrapped in pipe dope... over top of teflon tape... AND there was more pipe
dope under the tape. I stripped all that crap off the fitting with a wire
brush and installed it in the new dishwasher. Tape on the tapered pipe
thread into the machine, and nothing on the compression side from the supply
line. Amazingly it work just like it was designed.

Wadda dope!




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Old May 12th 10, 08:06 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 544
Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!

On Wed, 12 May 2010 10:50:01 -0700, "Bob La Londe"
wrote:

I was just replacing our dishwasher with a new one, and I noticed
something...

First off let me tell you in the past I have always swapped stuff like this
myself, but when we moved into this house we were just too busy and I didn't
have time to do everything. I let my wife hire a plumber to install the
dishwasher we brought from the old house and move her fancy toilets.

Anyway, I pulled the compression nut off the water supply line and it was
wrapped in pipe dope... over top of teflon tape... AND there was more pipe
dope under the tape. I stripped all that crap off the fitting with a wire
brush and installed it in the new dishwasher. Tape on the tapered pipe
thread into the machine, and nothing on the compression side from the supply
line. Amazingly it work just like it was designed.

Wadda dope!


I scoffed the first time I saw dope on top of tape (tapered pipe
threads). Since then I've screwed together a lot of joints including
quite a few with messed up threads that would only seal with the
verboten combination of tape and dope. My most recent one was on the
oil cooler of a stranded 60's vintage bus. The pipe fitting had been
broken off flush and I could only get it out by slotting it with a die
grinder. Laying on my back with sand blowing and oil dripping in my
eyes while breathing bus exhaust (engine needed to run the
compressor), I couldn't be faulted too much for dinging the female
threads pretty badly. Especially since I'd driven to the middle of
nowhere to work for free. I figured that the best I could do was seal
the joint sufficiently to get the bus rolling while trailing a leak.
But lots of tape and a little dope actually sealed the thing. Not even
a drip.

Wayne
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Old May 12th 10, 08:11 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 82
Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!


"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
...
I was just replacing our dishwasher with a new one, and I noticed
something...

First off let me tell you in the past I have always swapped stuff like
this myself, but when we moved into this house we were just too busy and I
didn't have time to do everything. I let my wife hire a plumber to
install the dishwasher we brought from the old house and move her fancy
toilets.

Anyway, I pulled the compression nut off the water supply line and it was
wrapped in pipe dope... over top of teflon tape... AND there was more
pipe dope under the tape. I stripped all that crap off the fitting with a
wire brush and installed it in the new dishwasher. Tape on the tapered
pipe thread into the machine, and nothing on the compression side from the
supply line. Amazingly it work just like it was designed.

Wadda dope!




See! Wire brushes work MAGIC! Just make sure you throw them away after
each use and buy new ones.


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Old May 12th 10, 10:15 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2010
Posts: 204
Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!

Bob La Londe wrote:
I was just replacing our dishwasher with a new one, and I noticed
something...

First off let me tell you in the past I have always swapped stuff like
this myself, but when we moved into this house we were just too busy and
I didn't have time to do everything. I let my wife hire a plumber to
install the dishwasher we brought from the old house and move her fancy
toilets.

Anyway, I pulled the compression nut off the water supply line and it
was wrapped in pipe dope... over top of teflon tape... AND there was
more pipe dope under the tape. I stripped all that crap off the fitting
with a wire brush and installed it in the new dishwasher. Tape on the
tapered pipe thread into the machine, and nothing on the compression
side from the supply line. Amazingly it work just like it was designed.

Wadda dope!


Never, ever, check up on work that you've paid to have done. It only
leads to unhappiness.

This just reinforces what I always tell my wife about hiring workmen --
why should I pay good money to have them screw thing up, when I can
screw them up myself for free?!?

--
Tim Wescott
Control system and signal processing consulting
www.wescottdesign.com
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Old May 13th 10, 11:09 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 652
Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!

wrote in message
...
On Wed, 12 May 2010 10:50:01 -0700, "Bob La Londe"
wrote:

I was just replacing our dishwasher with a new one, and I noticed
something...

First off let me tell you in the past I have always swapped stuff like
this
myself, but when we moved into this house we were just too busy and I
didn't
have time to do everything. I let my wife hire a plumber to install the
dishwasher we brought from the old house and move her fancy toilets.

Anyway, I pulled the compression nut off the water supply line and it was
wrapped in pipe dope... over top of teflon tape... AND there was more
pipe
dope under the tape. I stripped all that crap off the fitting with a wire
brush and installed it in the new dishwasher. Tape on the tapered pipe
thread into the machine, and nothing on the compression side from the
supply
line. Amazingly it work just like it was designed.

Wadda dope!


I scoffed the first time I saw dope on top of tape (tapered pipe
threads). Since then I've screwed together a lot of joints including
quite a few with messed up threads that would only seal with the
verboten combination of tape and dope. My most recent one was on the
oil cooler of a stranded 60's vintage bus. The pipe fitting had been
broken off flush and I could only get it out by slotting it with a die
grinder. Laying on my back with sand blowing and oil dripping in my
eyes while breathing bus exhaust (engine needed to run the
compressor), I couldn't be faulted too much for dinging the female
threads pretty badly. Especially since I'd driven to the middle of
nowhere to work for free. I figured that the best I could do was seal
the joint sufficiently to get the bus rolling while trailing a leak.
But lots of tape and a little dope actually sealed the thing. Not even
a drip.


The thing is Teflon tape can actually prevent the nut of a compression,
flare, or double flare from going on fair enough to cause the connection to
seal properly.





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Old May 14th 10, 12:07 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 12,924
Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!


Bob La Londe wrote:

The thing is Teflon tape can actually prevent the nut of a compression,
flare, or double flare from going on fair enough to cause the connection to
seal properly.



It can also stop a leak in the middle of the night, when there are no
24 hour plumbing supply places if you know how to do it.


--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.
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Old May 14th 10, 02:38 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!

"Michael A. Terrell" wrote in message
om...

Bob La Londe wrote:

The thing is Teflon tape can actually prevent the nut of a compression,
flare, or double flare from going on fair enough to cause the connection
to
seal properly.



It can also stop a leak in the middle of the night, when there are no
24 hour plumbing supply places if you know how to do it.



I think we are going to have to agree to disagree on this one. The only way
I can see Teflon tape help on a bad compression or flare connection is if
its overwrapped off of the thread and onto the mating surfaces to form a
sort of jacked up gasket. We are going beyond shade tree on that one.






--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.


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Old May 14th 10, 04:53 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 12,924
Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!


Bob La Londe wrote:

"Michael A. Terrell" wrote in message
om...

Bob La Londe wrote:

The thing is Teflon tape can actually prevent the nut of a compression,
flare, or double flare from going on fair enough to cause the connection
to
seal properly.



It can also stop a leak in the middle of the night, when there are no
24 hour plumbing supply places if you know how to do it.


I think we are going to have to agree to disagree on this one. The only way
I can see Teflon tape help on a bad compression or flare connection is if
its overwrapped off of the thread and onto the mating surfaces to form a
sort of jacked up gasket. We are going beyond shade tree on that one.



I used it on an out of round compression fitting on a toilet shutoff
valve. It filled the void, and stopped the leak until I replaced the
toilet a year later. The 'plumber' had used too short of a tube and
crimped it before the gland nut was tight enough. I'm not saying to use
it every time, but sometimes it keeps you from being without running
water while you get the right parts.


--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.
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Old May 14th 10, 07:25 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2010
Posts: 457
Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!


"Michael A. Terrell" wrote in message
m...

Bob La Londe wrote:

"Michael A. Terrell" wrote in message
om...

Bob La Londe wrote:

The thing is Teflon tape can actually prevent the nut of a
compression,
flare, or double flare from going on fair enough to cause the
connection
to
seal properly.


It can also stop a leak in the middle of the night, when there are no
24 hour plumbing supply places if you know how to do it.


I think we are going to have to agree to disagree on this one. The only
way
I can see Teflon tape help on a bad compression or flare connection is if
its overwrapped off of the thread and onto the mating surfaces to form a
sort of jacked up gasket. We are going beyond shade tree on that one.



I used it on an out of round compression fitting on a toilet shutoff
valve. It filled the void, and stopped the leak until I replaced the
toilet a year later. The 'plumber' had used too short of a tube and
crimped it before the gland nut was tight enough. I'm not saying to use
it every time, but sometimes it keeps you from being without running
water while you get the right parts.


--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.


God, I HATE compression fittings! Shark-Bites are TOOOOO cool!


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Old May 14th 10, 08:04 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 12,924
Default NO DOPE!!! Dope!


Buerste wrote:

Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I used it on an out of round compression fitting on a toilet shutoff
valve. It filled the void, and stopped the leak until I replaced the
toilet a year later. The 'plumber' had used too short of a tube and
crimped it before the gland nut was tight enough. I'm not saying to use
it every time, but sometimes it keeps you from being without running
water while you get the right parts.


God, I HATE compression fittings! Shark-Bites are TOOOOO cool!



I might be getting old, but I still prefer soldered copper fittings.


--
Anyone wanting to run for any political office in the US should have to
have a DD214, and a honorable discharge.


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