Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11   Report Post  
Old February 18th 08, 10:16 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 70
Default Bull**** by the numbers


"Tim Wescott" wrote in message
news
On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 09:11:27 -0800, SteveB wrote:

Some of those Toyota ads during the Daytona 500 were amazing. I owned a
Toyota SR5, and it was a good truck, but just a wannabe truck.

They say the PU will take 30,000 of energy, and drop an obviously empty
box into the bed from a height, suspended from a helicopter.

Now, I know the box didn't weigh 30,000# or the tires would have burst.
I know that an object gains energy as it falls.

Can anyone estimate what the box actually weighed?

I think the ad is misleading to the 99% of the people who don't
understand what they are seeing.

Some of those other ads are very questionable to me, too. Show me real
life situations, and not something that I'll never ever run into in
driving.

Steve


I think I saw that ad, but with the sound turned off. You mean you don't
live in a place where helicopters routinely drop large crates into the
backs of moving pickups? Here in Oregon City we have to keep an eye out
for that all the time. We just listen for a helicopter and start
swerving when we do (unless we drive Toyotas, in which case we know it'll
turn out OK). However, just east of here in Estacada and Molalla it
happens so often that truck owners openly display rifles in the back
windows of their trucks, as a warning to the helicopter pilots that they
may be shot down if they make the attempt.

Of course, these guys rarely try this trick if you have a canopy, a pipe
rack or even a tonneau cover, so the country-boy wannabes who move to
Estacada or Molalla for the cheap housing and proximity to hiking (at all
times of the year but hunting season, where you may encounter men with
Guns), will often have these mounted on their trucks as protection.

Did they really say "30,000 pounds of energy"? If so, they were
emphatically stating that they don't know physics, or that in their
considered opinion you don't, because a pound is not a measure of
energy. To be excruciatingly technical, a pound is a measure of force,
which makes a foot-pound a measure of energy (as well as of torque, it
depends on what you do with it). Even if you take a pound as a measure
of mass (it isn't, although engineers do use a "pound-mass" to mean
approximately 1/32 of a slug) then it's still not a measure of energy
unless you either (a) specify a velocity (squared) to multiply the mass
by, or (b) assume that they meant the energy released by directly
converting over 13000 kilograms of mass to energy, in which case the
truck, the helicopter, and possibly the entire earth would have been
blown up.

--
Tim Wescott


What he said.



  #12   Report Post  
Old February 18th 08, 10:19 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 70
Default Bull**** by the numbers


"Pete C." wrote in message
...
SteveB wrote:

Some of those Toyota ads during the Daytona 500 were amazing. I owned a
Toyota SR5, and it was a good truck, but just a wannabe truck.

They say the PU will take 30,000 of energy, and drop an obviously empty
box
into the bed from a height, suspended from a helicopter.

Now, I know the box didn't weigh 30,000# or the tires would have burst.
I
know that an object gains energy as it falls.

Can anyone estimate what the box actually weighed?

I think the ad is misleading to the 99% of the people who don't
understand
what they are seeing.

Some of those other ads are very questionable to me, too. Show me real
life
situations, and not something that I'll never ever run into in driving.

Steve


This is what happens when you let clueless marketing dweebs read and
misinterpret technical literature and then have the ad copy run by
equally clueless lawyers.


I'm surprised that they didn't have a buxom blonde with big hair in there
running an OA torch (with acetylene valve only open) and wearing a tank top
and a welding hood.

Steve


  #13   Report Post  
Old February 19th 08, 05:54 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 879
Default Bull**** by the numbers


"SteveB" wrote in message
...

Some of those other ads are very questionable to me, too. Show me real

life
situations, and not something that I'll never ever run into in driving.


The whole idea of driving is to not run in to anything.


--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.


  #14   Report Post  
Old February 19th 08, 02:08 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2007
Posts: 11
Default Bull**** by the numbers

It maybe just a cultural mis-step, with Toyota top dogs in Japan giving the
OK to the ad smug in the knowledge that NASCAR fans are ignorant rednecks
who would fall for anything. On the other hand, the possibility of a big
crate falling into your truck is about the same as needing 4 wheel drive
going to and from Albertsons every day.

"Roger Shoaf" wrote in message
...

"SteveB" wrote in message
...

Some of those other ads are very questionable to me, too. Show me real

life
situations, and not something that I'll never ever run into in driving.


The whole idea of driving is to not run in to anything.


--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.




  #15   Report Post  
Old February 19th 08, 04:56 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 70
Default Bull**** by the numbers


"Jim Insolo" wrote in message
...
It maybe just a cultural mis-step, with Toyota top dogs in Japan giving
the
OK to the ad smug in the knowledge that NASCAR fans are ignorant rednecks
who would fall for anything. On the other hand, the possibility of a big
crate falling into your truck is about the same as needing 4 wheel drive
going to and from Albertsons every day.


I guess some rednecks are stooping to driving Toyotas today. But the ones I
have seen are wannabe rednecks driving wannabe trucks. But then, with the
high price tag mentality, they think for some reason the truck is better
than others.

BTW, have you tried getting into the Albertson's store in Cedar City, Utah
through the snow drifts? 4wd works.

Steve




  #16   Report Post  
Old February 19th 08, 09:13 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,620
Default Bull**** by the numbers

On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 10:06:07 -0800, Gunner Asch wrote:

On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 08:56:18 -0800, "SteveB"
wrote:


"Jim Insolo" wrote in message
...
It maybe just a cultural mis-step, with Toyota top dogs in Japan
giving the
OK to the ad smug in the knowledge that NASCAR fans are ignorant
rednecks who would fall for anything. On the other hand, the
possibility of a big crate falling into your truck is about the same
as needing 4 wheel drive going to and from Albertsons every day.


I guess some rednecks are stooping to driving Toyotas today. But the
ones I have seen are wannabe rednecks driving wannabe trucks. But then,
with the high price tag mentality, they think for some reason the truck
is better than others.

BTW, have you tried getting into the Albertson's store in Cedar City,
Utah through the snow drifts? 4wd works.

Steve

Just out of curiosity, what is a "wannabe redneck"?

(snip)

I don't know about Steve, but I'd put it down as someone who lives a
suburban life, but has some peculiar notions about the ease and joy of
living in the country so they try to imitate the external signs of a
country boy (or girl) without really having a clue of what is actually
involved. Your average country life can be quite joyous, but it's only
easy if you're filthy rich.

So, here some of the signs that I look for:

* Dressed like a cowboy going to a dance, but:
* They do it every day, to go to the office;
* they wouldn't know which end of a horse to put a halter on, much
less how to do so without injury to themselves or the horse;
* they think the question "do you prefer a snaffle or a curb?" is
either about car racing or bizarre sexual practices.
* They drive a five year old "truck" which has no scratches on the bed.
* They have a big shiny 4WD rig that has never left dry pavement.
* They have ****kicker boots which have never, ever, touched _anything_
that came out of a horse.

(I'd put in a dig about always voting republican because Regan was a real
cowboy, but I'll refrain in no small part because fools come in all
political stripes).

I suppose if there were movies about heroic welders ("Return to Brokeback
Shipyard"?) you'd see people wearing pristine welding caps, boots and
shirts...

--
Tim Wescott
Control systems and communications consulting
http://www.wescottdesign.com

Need to learn how to apply control theory in your embedded system?
"Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" by Tim Wescott
Elsevier/Newnes, http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html
  #17   Report Post  
Old February 20th 08, 01:45 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 49
Default Bull**** by the numbers

On Feb 19, 2:13 pm, Tim Wescott wrote:

I don't know about Steve, but I'd put it down as someone who lives a
suburban life, but has some peculiar notions about the ease and joy of
living in the country so they try to imitate the external signs of a
country boy (or girl) without really having a clue of what is actually
involved. Your average country life can be quite joyous, but it's only
easy if you're filthy rich.


I don't think it's that so much as the desire to be seen as a MAN.
Too many guys are in dorky office jobs and envy the guy who can use a
chainsaw or other dangerous stuff, or even wrenches and hammers. Just
look at the flyers from the hardware and tool shops: full of stuff
aimed right at those office guys. Not much of it is really useful to
the real outdoorsman or mechanic, but it sure looks good in the garage
or yard. Impresses the other dorky guys in the neighborhood. Until
the user cuts off a hand or something. Or gets his 4x4 stuck in a
tiny puddle. Or rolls it into the ditch, a result of thinking that
having 4WD makes him immune to the black ice.
Lots of guys have grown up in homes where there was no chance
of fooling with mechanical stuff, and they miss it. I made sure my son
had access to lots of tools, power tools of his own when he was only
10 or so, things like a small drill press and scroll saw. Now he is
admired for his abilities, while his friends are all going to college
to try to learn something.

Dan
  #18   Report Post  
Old February 20th 08, 04:00 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 70
Default Bull**** by the numbers


"Tim Wescott" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 10:06:07 -0800, Gunner Asch wrote:

On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 08:56:18 -0800, "SteveB"
wrote:


"Jim Insolo" wrote in message
...
It maybe just a cultural mis-step, with Toyota top dogs in Japan
giving the
OK to the ad smug in the knowledge that NASCAR fans are ignorant
rednecks who would fall for anything. On the other hand, the
possibility of a big crate falling into your truck is about the same
as needing 4 wheel drive going to and from Albertsons every day.

I guess some rednecks are stooping to driving Toyotas today. But the
ones I have seen are wannabe rednecks driving wannabe trucks. But then,
with the high price tag mentality, they think for some reason the truck
is better than others.

BTW, have you tried getting into the Albertson's store in Cedar City,
Utah through the snow drifts? 4wd works.

Steve

Just out of curiosity, what is a "wannabe redneck"?

(snip)

I don't know about Steve, but I'd put it down as someone who lives a
suburban life, but has some peculiar notions about the ease and joy of
living in the country so they try to imitate the external signs of a
country boy (or girl) without really having a clue of what is actually
involved. Your average country life can be quite joyous, but it's only
easy if you're filthy rich.

So, here some of the signs that I look for:

* Dressed like a cowboy going to a dance, but:
* They do it every day, to go to the office;
* they wouldn't know which end of a horse to put a halter on, much
less how to do so without injury to themselves or the horse;
* they think the question "do you prefer a snaffle or a curb?" is
either about car racing or bizarre sexual practices.
* They drive a five year old "truck" which has no scratches on the bed.
* They have a big shiny 4WD rig that has never left dry pavement.
* They have ****kicker boots which have never, ever, touched _anything_
that came out of a horse.

(I'd put in a dig about always voting republican because Regan was a real
cowboy, but I'll refrain in no small part because fools come in all
political stripes).

I suppose if there were movies about heroic welders ("Return to Brokeback
Shipyard"?) you'd see people wearing pristine welding caps, boots and
shirts...

--
Tim Wescott
Control systems and communications consulting
http://www.wescottdesign.com

Need to learn how to apply control theory in your embedded system?
"Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" by Tim Wescott
Elsevier/Newnes, http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html


Boy, you hit it on the head. Only thing I'd add is that they would be
wearing creased ironed starched Levis, and similarly treated Wrangler
shirts. Plaid, pink, puce, or mauve, of course.

Steve


  #19   Report Post  
Old February 20th 08, 04:02 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 70
Default Bull**** by the numbers


wrote in message
...
On Feb 19, 2:13 pm, Tim Wescott wrote:

I don't know about Steve, but I'd put it down as someone who lives a
suburban life, but has some peculiar notions about the ease and joy of
living in the country so they try to imitate the external signs of a
country boy (or girl) without really having a clue of what is actually
involved. Your average country life can be quite joyous, but it's only
easy if you're filthy rich.


I don't think it's that so much as the desire to be seen as a MAN.
Too many guys are in dorky office jobs and envy the guy who can use a
chainsaw or other dangerous stuff, or even wrenches and hammers. Just
look at the flyers from the hardware and tool shops: full of stuff
aimed right at those office guys. Not much of it is really useful to
the real outdoorsman or mechanic, but it sure looks good in the garage
or yard. Impresses the other dorky guys in the neighborhood. Until
the user cuts off a hand or something. Or gets his 4x4 stuck in a
tiny puddle. Or rolls it into the ditch, a result of thinking that
having 4WD makes him immune to the black ice.
Lots of guys have grown up in homes where there was no chance
of fooling with mechanical stuff, and they miss it. I made sure my son
had access to lots of tools, power tools of his own when he was only
10 or so, things like a small drill press and scroll saw. Now he is
admired for his abilities, while his friends are all going to college
to try to learn something.

Dan


I think that early access to reality problem solving kickstarts something in
the brain. That early start gives them a leg up that the others never catch
up on. Just like a 20 year old will never catch up to the age of a 40 year
old.

Steve


  #20   Report Post  
Old February 20th 08, 04:34 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,620
Default Bull**** by the numbers

On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 20:00:26 -0800, SteveB wrote:

"Tim Wescott" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 10:06:07 -0800, Gunner Asch wrote:

On Tue, 19 Feb 2008 08:56:18 -0800, "SteveB"
wrote:


"Jim Insolo" wrote in message
...
It maybe just a cultural mis-step, with Toyota top dogs in Japan
giving the
OK to the ad smug in the knowledge that NASCAR fans are ignorant
rednecks who would fall for anything. On the other hand, the
possibility of a big crate falling into your truck is about the same
as needing 4 wheel drive going to and from Albertsons every day.

I guess some rednecks are stooping to driving Toyotas today. But the
ones I have seen are wannabe rednecks driving wannabe trucks. But
then, with the high price tag mentality, they think for some reason
the truck is better than others.

BTW, have you tried getting into the Albertson's store in Cedar City,
Utah through the snow drifts? 4wd works.

Steve

Just out of curiosity, what is a "wannabe redneck"?

(snip)

I don't know about Steve, but I'd put it down as someone who lives a
suburban life, but has some peculiar notions about the ease and joy of
living in the country so they try to imitate the external signs of a
country boy (or girl) without really having a clue of what is actually
involved. Your average country life can be quite joyous, but it's only
easy if you're filthy rich.

So, here some of the signs that I look for:

* Dressed like a cowboy going to a dance, but:
* They do it every day, to go to the office; * they wouldn't know
which end of a horse to put a halter on, much
less how to do so without injury to themselves or the horse;
* they think the question "do you prefer a snaffle or a curb?" is
either about car racing or bizarre sexual practices.
* They drive a five year old "truck" which has no scratches on the bed.
* They have a big shiny 4WD rig that has never left dry pavement. *
They have ****kicker boots which have never, ever, touched _anything_
that came out of a horse.

(I'd put in a dig about always voting republican because Regan was a
real cowboy, but I'll refrain in no small part because fools come in
all political stripes).

I suppose if there were movies about heroic welders ("Return to
Brokeback Shipyard"?) you'd see people wearing pristine welding caps,
boots and shirts...

--
Tim Wescott
Control systems and communications consulting
http://www.wescottdesign.com

Need to learn how to apply control theory in your embedded system?
"Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" by Tim Wescott
Elsevier/Newnes, http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html


Boy, you hit it on the head. Only thing I'd add is that they would be
wearing creased ironed starched Levis, and similarly treated Wrangler
shirts. Plaid, pink, puce, or mauve, of course.

Steve


At one point they were wearing mechanically aged (stone washed) Levis. I
think you're still not ineffably cool if your pants don't come from the
store ripped up.

--
Tim Wescott
Control systems and communications consulting
http://www.wescottdesign.com

Need to learn how to apply control theory in your embedded system?
"Applied Control Theory for Embedded Systems" by Tim Wescott
Elsevier/Newnes, http://www.wescottdesign.com/actfes/actfes.html


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Only 368 posts so I'll Muse about bullshit Arch Woodturning 11 June 18th 06 02:19 PM
JVC VCR Part Numbers [email protected] Electronics Repair 4 October 28th 05 07:18 PM
OT OH AND THERE'S A REAL EXPERT ON THE BS LINE OF LIES AND TWISTS Dan Sullivan's BULLSHIT was: 'Client' [email protected] Home Repair 0 August 22nd 05 03:56 AM
"On Bullshit" And It's Application To Wooddorking Tom Watson Woodworking 17 June 15th 05 01:03 PM
Religion Bullshit Frank ess Woodworking 11 June 4th 05 07:45 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017