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Michael A. Terrell August 31st 07 03:36 PM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 
Larry Jaques wrote:

Do the voices in my head bother you?



After reading THIS newsgroup full of trolls, political wackos,
anti-America idiots and assholes that don't know NOT to pick up a red
hot horse shoe?? Get real!


--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
Member of DAV #85.

Michael A. Terrell
Central Florida

Gunner[_2_] August 31st 07 06:05 PM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 
On Fri, 31 Aug 2007 05:53:04 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Aug 2007 17:28:04 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,
Gunner quickly quoth:

On Thu, 30 Aug 2007 15:58:52 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Aug 2007 11:28:16 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,
Gunner quickly quoth:

On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 18:09:35 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

Down to 90F? ;) It was 100F here today. How melted was Taft?

I dont know..Ive not been home for 3 weeks..worked straight through on
finishing up the Project...Ill be home Friday..with luck.

Ooh, a good paycheck this month, eh?


Frankly..Ive made more on the Project in 4 months..than I grossed all
of last year..or really close.

My creditors are in love with me.


If you're that rich now, you should -have- any more creditors. Hmm,
unless that's how you met the tall panter the other night...


Not rich, not even well off..but working on paying off at least 5 yrs
worth of back medical bills, property taxes and so forth. When its
gone..Ill be back to being broke, but Ill have positioned myself a bit
better off as far as rolling stock and needed work tools and gotten a
few creditors off my back.


This is not a steamer..but a HOT water pressure washer. Or the
injector is adjusted wrongly.


Oh, OK. I've heard about dem jobbers but haven't seen one yet.


Not a bad idea!

Which, the brake fluid or the newsprint?


Both of course!!


Bueno, bwana. Have fun!

------------------------------------------
Do the voices in my head bother you?
------------------------------------------

Thanks!

Gunner

Bruce L. Bergman September 2nd 07 08:44 AM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 
On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 18:09:35 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

Try brake fluid first, though. It's cheaper (if not free) from the
brake shop. Another way to stretch your stripper is to put a couple
layers of newsprint on top. It helps keep it from evaporating too
quickly.


I would NOT use brake fluid as a paint stripper or for anything
other than it's intended use in a brake system.

Chemical Paint Strippers can be neutralized (read the label) and
after being neutralized they stop stripping paint and don't harm the
environment too much.

But AFAIK you can't neutralize brake fluid, and it's still going to
give the folks at the regional sewer plant a headache when that slug
of contaminated sewage comes through. And if you hose the effluent
into a storm drain you're going to cause a world of hurt to the
critters that live in that creek.

-- Bruce --


Larry Jaques September 2nd 07 12:37 PM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 
On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 00:44:39 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,
Bruce L. Bergman quickly quoth:

On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 18:09:35 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

Try brake fluid first, though. It's cheaper (if not free) from the
brake shop. Another way to stretch your stripper is to put a couple
layers of newsprint on top. It helps keep it from evaporating too
quickly.


I would NOT use brake fluid as a paint stripper or for anything
other than it's intended use in a brake system.


This looks just like a legal disclaimer, Bruce. ;)


Chemical Paint Strippers can be neutralized (read the label) and
after being neutralized they stop stripping paint and don't harm the
environment too much.


Other than at refinishing businesses where recycling is a reality,
I've never known anyone to attempt to neutralize paint stripper, and
I've seen a lot of stripping in 54 years.


But AFAIK you can't neutralize brake fluid, and it's still going to
give the folks at the regional sewer plant a headache when that slug
of contaminated sewage comes through. And if you hose the effluent
into a storm drain you're going to cause a world of hurt to the
critters that live in that creek.


I've also never known anyone rude enough to flush it. Most chem
strippers will evaporate and the paint rehardens. It's always trashed.
Ida thunk he'd simply wad up the newspapers and trash 'em like
everyone else. YMOV

--
"Not always right, but never uncertain." --Heinlein
-=-=-

Ed Huntress September 2nd 07 02:11 PM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 00:44:39 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,
Bruce L. Bergman quickly quoth:

On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 18:09:35 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

Try brake fluid first, though. It's cheaper (if not free) from the
brake shop. Another way to stretch your stripper is to put a couple
layers of newsprint on top. It helps keep it from evaporating too
quickly.


I would NOT use brake fluid as a paint stripper or for anything
other than it's intended use in a brake system.


This looks just like a legal disclaimer, Bruce. ;)


Chemical Paint Strippers can be neutralized (read the label) and
after being neutralized they stop stripping paint and don't harm the
environment too much.


Other than at refinishing businesses where recycling is a reality,
I've never known anyone to attempt to neutralize paint stripper, and
I've seen a lot of stripping in 54 years.


In large volume operations, methylene chloride is "neutralized" with
household chlorine bleach. I have no idea what the chemistry is. In small
applications, like a car, the stuff is so volatile that it's probably going
to evaporate before you can "neutralize" it. I've always used TSP to wash it
off, on the recommendation of a manufacturer of the stuff who I called about
it 30 years ago. Old info, and worth double-checking.



But AFAIK you can't neutralize brake fluid, and it's still going to
give the folks at the regional sewer plant a headache when that slug
of contaminated sewage comes through. And if you hose the effluent
into a storm drain you're going to cause a world of hurt to the
critters that live in that creek.


I've also never known anyone rude enough to flush it. Most chem
strippers will evaporate and the paint rehardens. It's always trashed.
Ida thunk he'd simply wad up the newspapers and trash 'em like
everyone else. YMOV


Brake fluid will not evaporate. If you have some that evaporates and you put
it in your car, you're going to crash. d8-)

It's non-volatile, toxic, and pernicious as hell. There are few worse things
you can throw in the trash or allow to get into a storm sewer. It's a bitch
to get the last bit of film from the stuff off of a surface. I would never
consider using it on anything I was going to paint.

Regarding methylene chloride, the big danger is that it causes the
generation of carbon monoxide in your blood, if you inhale a lot of it. It
can cause heart attacks. Use it outdoors and downwind.

Today's commercial strippers can consist of all kinds of weird chemicals.
Here's a pretty good rundown of strippers sold to consumers. It applies to
use on wood, but those are the strippers you're going to find on store
shelves, anyway:

http://www.woodzone.com/articles/paint_stripper.htm

--
Ed Huntress



[email protected] September 2nd 07 03:54 PM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 
On Aug 28, 8:48 pm, Bob Engelhardt wrote:
wrote:
I've done a whole car with stripper, one panel at a time. It's messy,
it's nasty, it's FAST. ... body shop supply, picked up a quart of
aircraft finish stripper. 15 minutes after application, the paint had
bubbled off and just rinsed away. ...


Wow - good stuff! Do you remember how much it took to do the whole car?

Bob


I think I went through the better part of a gallon can over the
summer. Was a VW Squareback, I could take body panels off, hang them
up and do what I needed to do one at a time. Badly weathered paint,
worn through to the primer in a lot of places, but it still stuck very
wel!

Stan


Larry Jaques September 3rd 07 12:53 AM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 
On Sun, 2 Sep 2007 09:11:28 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, "Ed
Huntress" quickly quoth:


"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
.. .
On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 00:44:39 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,
Bruce L. Bergman quickly quoth:

On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 18:09:35 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

Try brake fluid first, though. It's cheaper (if not free) from the
brake shop. Another way to stretch your stripper is to put a couple
layers of newsprint on top. It helps keep it from evaporating too
quickly.

I would NOT use brake fluid as a paint stripper or for anything
other than it's intended use in a brake system.


This looks just like a legal disclaimer, Bruce. ;)


Chemical Paint Strippers can be neutralized (read the label) and
after being neutralized they stop stripping paint and don't harm the
environment too much.


Other than at refinishing businesses where recycling is a reality,
I've never known anyone to attempt to neutralize paint stripper, and
I've seen a lot of stripping in 54 years.


In large volume operations, methylene chloride is "neutralized" with
household chlorine bleach. I have no idea what the chemistry is. In small
applications, like a car, the stuff is so volatile that it's probably going
to evaporate before you can "neutralize" it. I've always used TSP to wash it
off, on the recommendation of a manufacturer of the stuff who I called about
it 30 years ago. Old info, and worth double-checking.



But AFAIK you can't neutralize brake fluid, and it's still going to
give the folks at the regional sewer plant a headache when that slug
of contaminated sewage comes through. And if you hose the effluent
into a storm drain you're going to cause a world of hurt to the
critters that live in that creek.


I've also never known anyone rude enough to flush it. Most chem
strippers will evaporate and the paint rehardens. It's always trashed.
Ida thunk he'd simply wad up the newspapers and trash 'em like
everyone else. YMOV


Brake fluid will not evaporate. If you have some that evaporates and you put
it in your car, you're going to crash. d8-)


I said "most chem strippers will evaporate". I know brake fluid
doesn't.


It's non-volatile, toxic, and pernicious as hell. There are few worse things
you can throw in the trash or allow to get into a storm sewer. It's a bitch


What's worse: 5 gallons of thinners in the air or half a gallon of
glycol-ether-based brake fluid in the dump? I wonder what the
chemical result of it breaking down paint is, what it turns into. Less
harmful, one might hope?


to get the last bit of film from the stuff off of a surface. I would never
consider using it on anything I was going to paint.


Wuss. ;) Quick cleanup: wipe dry, wash with soap and water, dry
again, and spray and wipe with cleaner. Berryman's B-12 takes it off
quickly and easily, even from porous brake shoes. I've also used
naphtha and/or lacquer thinner (my most-used cleaner) after brake
jobs. On non-porous metal, it's a quick deal. Soap and water take 99%
of it off and the thinner takes the last 1% film. Not a prob.

B-12 contains toluene, methanol, heptanes, and acetone. Don't breathe
it deeply, either.


Regarding methylene chloride, the big danger is that it causes the
generation of carbon monoxide in your blood, if you inhale a lot of it. It
can cause heart attacks. Use it outdoors and downwind.


Absolutely. That's nastyass stuff.


Today's commercial strippers can consist of all kinds of weird chemicals.
Here's a pretty good rundown of strippers sold to consumers. It applies to
use on wood, but those are the strippers you're going to find on store
shelves, anyway:

http://www.woodzone.com/articles/paint_stripper.htm


Informative. Danke.

--
"Not always right, but never uncertain." --Heinlein
-=-=-

Ed Huntress September 3rd 07 01:59 AM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 

"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 2 Sep 2007 09:11:28 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, "Ed
Huntress" quickly quoth:


"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
. ..
On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 00:44:39 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,
Bruce L. Bergman quickly quoth:

On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 18:09:35 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

Try brake fluid first, though. It's cheaper (if not free) from the
brake shop. Another way to stretch your stripper is to put a couple
layers of newsprint on top. It helps keep it from evaporating too
quickly.

I would NOT use brake fluid as a paint stripper or for anything
other than it's intended use in a brake system.

This looks just like a legal disclaimer, Bruce. ;)


Chemical Paint Strippers can be neutralized (read the label) and
after being neutralized they stop stripping paint and don't harm the
environment too much.

Other than at refinishing businesses where recycling is a reality,
I've never known anyone to attempt to neutralize paint stripper, and
I've seen a lot of stripping in 54 years.


In large volume operations, methylene chloride is "neutralized" with
household chlorine bleach. I have no idea what the chemistry is. In small
applications, like a car, the stuff is so volatile that it's probably
going
to evaporate before you can "neutralize" it. I've always used TSP to wash
it
off, on the recommendation of a manufacturer of the stuff who I called
about
it 30 years ago. Old info, and worth double-checking.



But AFAIK you can't neutralize brake fluid, and it's still going to
give the folks at the regional sewer plant a headache when that slug
of contaminated sewage comes through. And if you hose the effluent
into a storm drain you're going to cause a world of hurt to the
critters that live in that creek.

I've also never known anyone rude enough to flush it. Most chem
strippers will evaporate and the paint rehardens. It's always trashed.
Ida thunk he'd simply wad up the newspapers and trash 'em like
everyone else. YMOV


Brake fluid will not evaporate. If you have some that evaporates and you
put
it in your car, you're going to crash. d8-)


I said "most chem strippers will evaporate". I know brake fluid
doesn't.


It's non-volatile, toxic, and pernicious as hell. There are few worse
things
you can throw in the trash or allow to get into a storm sewer. It's a
bitch


What's worse: 5 gallons of thinners in the air or half a gallon of
glycol-ether-based brake fluid in the dump?


I'd go for the thinners in the air, if you went gallon-for-gallon. In that
10:1 ratio you propose, I couldn't guess.

I wonder what the
chemical result of it breaking down paint is, what it turns into. Less
harmful, one might hope?


Ya' got me. Chemistry makes my head hurt.



to get the last bit of film from the stuff off of a surface. I would never
consider using it on anything I was going to paint.


Wuss. ;) Quick cleanup: wipe dry, wash with soap and water, dry
again, and spray and wipe with cleaner. Berryman's B-12 takes it off
quickly and easily, even from porous brake shoes. I've also used
naphtha and/or lacquer thinner (my most-used cleaner) after brake
jobs. On non-porous metal, it's a quick deal. Soap and water take 99%
of it off and the thinner takes the last 1% film. Not a prob.

B-12 contains toluene, methanol, heptanes, and acetone. Don't breathe
it deeply, either.


Regarding methylene chloride, the big danger is that it causes the
generation of carbon monoxide in your blood, if you inhale a lot of it. It
can cause heart attacks. Use it outdoors and downwind.


Absolutely. That's nastyass stuff.


Today's commercial strippers can consist of all kinds of weird chemicals.
Here's a pretty good rundown of strippers sold to consumers. It applies to
use on wood, but those are the strippers you're going to find on store
shelves, anyway:

http://www.woodzone.com/articles/paint_stripper.htm


Informative. Danke.

--
"Not always right, but never uncertain." --Heinlein
-=-=-


--
Ed Huntress



Gerald Miller September 3rd 07 02:23 AM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 
Best paint stripper I ever found was trichlorethylene. Drop the
painted item into a pan of tri' , wait a half hour and lift the item
out sans paint.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada

Gunner Asch[_2_] September 3rd 07 05:16 AM

Best way to strip flaking paint on a trailer body and sheetmetal
 
On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 00:44:39 -0700, Bruce L. Bergman
wrote:

On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 18:09:35 -0700, Larry Jaques
wrote:

Try brake fluid first, though. It's cheaper (if not free) from the
brake shop. Another way to stretch your stripper is to put a couple
layers of newsprint on top. It helps keep it from evaporating too
quickly.


I would NOT use brake fluid as a paint stripper or for anything
other than it's intended use in a brake system.

Chemical Paint Strippers can be neutralized (read the label) and
after being neutralized they stop stripping paint and don't harm the
environment too much.

But AFAIK you can't neutralize brake fluid, and it's still going to
give the folks at the regional sewer plant a headache when that slug
of contaminated sewage comes through. And if you hose the effluent
into a storm drain you're going to cause a world of hurt to the
critters that live in that creek.

-- Bruce --



Bruce..sewer? Creek? This is Taft, one of the armpits of the world.

We have creeks...called "oil ditches"

Gunner



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