Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old May 31st 04, 06:45 AM
CWLee
 
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Default Origin of Hex Head Nuts/bolts?


Can anyone here point me toward an authoritative history of
hex head nuts and bolts? I see square nuts and bolts in old
machinery and tools in museums, but I don't think I've seen
a hex head nut or bolt in anything built before 1900. Does
anyone know who invented/developed the hex head nuts and
bolts? When, where, why, etc? Any info on this topic
appreciated.

Many thanks.

--
----------
CWLee
"If elected, my highest priority upon taking office will be
to get the gazelles and the lions to negotiate a peaceful
solution to their long-standing differences." Tarzan,
Democratic candidate for King of the Jungle.


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Old May 31st 04, 09:41 AM
Leon Heller
 
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Default Origin of Hex Head Nuts/bolts?

"CWLee" wrote in message
...

Can anyone here point me toward an authoritative history of
hex head nuts and bolts? I see square nuts and bolts in old
machinery and tools in museums, but I don't think I've seen
a hex head nut or bolt in anything built before 1900. Does
anyone know who invented/developed the hex head nuts and
bolts? When, where, why, etc? Any info on this topic
appreciated.


Probably Sir Joseph Whitworth - he standardised the threads used in screws
and bolts in 1841 and must have standardised the heads as well. There was a
TV program about him recently here in the UK.

Leon
--
--
Leon Heller, G1HSM
http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller


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Old May 31st 04, 05:05 PM
Davidlindq
 
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Default Origin of Hex Head Nuts/bolts?

"CWLee" wrote in message
...

Can anyone here point me toward an authoritative history of
hex head nuts and bolts? I see square nuts and bolts in old
machinery and tools in museums, but I don't think I've seen
a hex head nut or bolt in anything built before 1900. Does
anyone know who invented/developed the hex head nuts and
bolts? When, where, why, etc? Any info on this topic
appreciated.


This isn't authoratative history, but I've seen photographs of Civil War era
seacoast mortars where it can be clearly seen that the carriage is assemled
with square head bolts and HEX head nuts.
David


David Lindquist

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Old May 31st 04, 08:16 PM
Rex B
 
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Default Origin of Hex Head Nuts/bolts?

On Mon, 31 May 2004 08:41:06 +0100, "Leon Heller"
wrote:

||"CWLee" wrote in message
...
||
|| Can anyone here point me toward an authoritative history of
|| hex head nuts and bolts? I see square nuts and bolts in old
|| machinery and tools in museums, but I don't think I've seen
|| a hex head nut or bolt in anything built before 1900. Does
|| anyone know who invented/developed the hex head nuts and
|| bolts? When, where, why, etc? Any info on this topic
|| appreciated.
||
||Probably Sir Joseph Whitworth - he standardised the threads used in screws
||and bolts in 1841 and must have standardised the heads as well. There was a
||TV program about him recently here in the UK.

And every kid who bought a ratty TR4 in the 1960's knows the name Whitwort,
although most thought his first name was "Goddam".
Texas Parts Guy
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Old June 1st 04, 01:38 AM
The Masked Marvel
 
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Default Origin of Hex Head Nuts/bolts?

Not to mention the "constant depression" carbs (as opposed to "constant
area", among other adjectives). and Lucas, the prince of darkness (and the
reason the brits drink warm beer: Lucas refrigerators), but I don't have an
answer to hex vs square heads.

"Rex B" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 31 May 2004 08:41:06 +0100, "Leon Heller"


wrote:

||"CWLee" wrote in message
...
||
|| Can anyone here point me toward an authoritative history of
|| hex head nuts and bolts? I see square nuts and bolts in old
|| machinery and tools in museums, but I don't think I've seen
|| a hex head nut or bolt in anything built before 1900. Does
|| anyone know who invented/developed the hex head nuts and
|| bolts? When, where, why, etc? Any info on this topic
|| appreciated.
||
||Probably Sir Joseph Whitworth - he standardised the threads used in

screws
||and bolts in 1841 and must have standardised the heads as well. There

was a
||TV program about him recently here in the UK.

And every kid who bought a ratty TR4 in the 1960's knows the name

Whitwort,
although most thought his first name was "Goddam".
Texas Parts Guy



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Old June 1st 04, 02:40 AM
PAROADHOG
 
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Default Origin of Hex Head Nuts/bolts?

Not to mention the "constant depression" carbs (as opposed to "constant
area", among other adjectives). and Lucas, the prince of darkness (and the
reason the brits drink warm beer: Lucas refrigerators)


Aw c'mon now guys , be honest. Lucas electrics weren't really all that bad
except when they were on poorly maintained machinery.
I've been a motorcycle mechanic for years and my personal experience is that
Lucas electric components have actually been a bit more reliable than
Nippondenso and other popular brands.
YMMV
  #9   Report Post  
Old June 1st 04, 03:31 AM
jim rozen
 
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Default Origin of Hex Head Nuts/bolts?

In article , PAROADHOG says...

Aw c'mon now guys , be honest. Lucas electrics weren't really all that bad
except when they were on poorly maintained machinery.


Wrong. Even on impeccably maintained vehicles the stuff was
was simply poorly engineered. For example BSA, Triumph, and
Norton all sold motorbikes with the archaic zener diode
"regulator" technology, that was simply not up to the
US DOT requirements for full-time headlight on use. The
batteries would simply go dead because the charging
system was improperly designed.

The diode would sink 50 watts max, so the dynamo (that's
what the brits termed them) could only put out that much
at maxiumum.

The total load on the bike was 45 watts for the headlight,
5 watts tail light, plus an amp or two for the ignition
system. Add them all up and the buss voltage was typically
11 volts. Not enough to charge. God forbid you should
have turn signals or a brake light.

Never trust a bike with an ammeter in the headlight bucket.

Honda understood the frustration that faced riders, and
marketed their vehicles with absolutely bulletproof
charging systems. This was one way they were able to
eat the brit manufacturer's lunch.

Jim

==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================

  #10   Report Post  
Old June 1st 04, 05:51 AM
Martin H. Eastburn
 
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Default Origin of Hex Head Nuts/bolts?

Davidlindq wrote:
"CWLee" wrote in message
...

Can anyone here point me toward an authoritative history of
hex head nuts and bolts? I see square nuts and bolts in old
machinery and tools in museums, but I don't think I've seen
a hex head nut or bolt in anything built before 1900. Does
anyone know who invented/developed the hex head nuts and
bolts? When, where, why, etc? Any info on this topic
appreciated.



This isn't authoratative history, but I've seen photographs of Civil War era
seacoast mortars where it can be clearly seen that the carriage is assemled
with square head bolts and HEX head nuts.
David


David Lindquist

Wonder if the Hex head nuts were from Henry or Sharps - e.g.
Threaded rifle barrel that failed for other reasons.

Seems logical - need two wrenches anyway - might be the production issue.

Martin

--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer

NRA LOH, NRA Life
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder



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