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jim rozen
 
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Default Winchester 62A followup

Thanks to those who supplied expertise. The trouble is
solved as far as I can tell, and it took:

1) a brand new magazine spring from Numrich Arms, and
2) a brand new follower, likewise.

I was frankly *amazed* at the difference between the old
spring, and the new one. I was able to install the old
one without hardly blinking twice, the new one was like
trying to stuff a snake into a keyhole. I finally hit on
the idea of slipping a long thin piece of round stock
down the center of the spring to keep it from kinking
up as it was fed in.

Clearly the old follower was not the correct one for this gun,
the new one was much larger in diameter on the pusher side,
and is not designed to extend out into the elevator mechanism
in the gun.

Because I did not want to load up a bunch of live rounds
to test the feeding, I machined up four aluminum dummy
..22 rounds, that was most of the time spend on this project.

Jim

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Statics
 
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Default Winchester 62A followup

Glad to hear it worked out for ya Jim. Those old pumps sure can be fun.

I repaired an old one for a friend that had been through a lot of shells.
The lockup surfaces were simply mashed out of shape (soft steel). I am a
little surprised pump .22's are not more popular. Kinda catchy.

StaticsJason


"jim rozen" wrote in message
...
Thanks to those who supplied expertise. The trouble is
solved as far as I can tell, and it took:

1) a brand new magazine spring from Numrich Arms, and
2) a brand new follower, likewise.

I was frankly *amazed* at the difference between the old
spring, and the new one. I was able to install the old
one without hardly blinking twice, the new one was like
trying to stuff a snake into a keyhole. I finally hit on
the idea of slipping a long thin piece of round stock
down the center of the spring to keep it from kinking
up as it was fed in.

Clearly the old follower was not the correct one for this gun,
the new one was much larger in diameter on the pusher side,
and is not designed to extend out into the elevator mechanism
in the gun.

Because I did not want to load up a bunch of live rounds
to test the feeding, I machined up four aluminum dummy
.22 rounds, that was most of the time spend on this project.

Jim

==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================



  #3   Report Post  
Gunner
 
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Default Winchester 62A followup

On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 22:21:14 -0500, "Statics"
wrote:

Glad to hear it worked out for ya Jim. Those old pumps sure can be fun.

I repaired an old one for a friend that had been through a lot of shells.
The lockup surfaces were simply mashed out of shape (soft steel). I am a
little surprised pump .22's are not more popular. Kinda catchy.

StaticsJason


My son is a southpaw..and the first .22 I bought for him was a Remington
572 pump (age 8 or so).

The only realistic option for most lefthanded shooters are pump or lever
action rifles as most long guns are not made in LH actions (with some
notible exceptions)

Gunner



"jim rozen" wrote in message
...
Thanks to those who supplied expertise. The trouble is
solved as far as I can tell, and it took:

1) a brand new magazine spring from Numrich Arms, and
2) a brand new follower, likewise.

I was frankly *amazed* at the difference between the old
spring, and the new one. I was able to install the old
one without hardly blinking twice, the new one was like
trying to stuff a snake into a keyhole. I finally hit on
the idea of slipping a long thin piece of round stock
down the center of the spring to keep it from kinking
up as it was fed in.

Clearly the old follower was not the correct one for this gun,
the new one was much larger in diameter on the pusher side,
and is not designed to extend out into the elevator mechanism
in the gun.

Because I did not want to load up a bunch of live rounds
to test the feeding, I machined up four aluminum dummy
.22 rounds, that was most of the time spend on this project.

Jim

==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================



"A vote for Kerry is a de facto vote for bin Laden."
Strider
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jim rozen
 
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Default Winchester 62A followup

In article , Gunner says...

My son is a southpaw..and the first .22 I bought for him was a Remington
572 pump (age 8 or so).


Yep, I'm right-handed, but left eye dominant.

The only realistic option for most lefthanded shooters are pump or lever
action rifles as most long guns are not made in LH actions (with some
notible exceptions)


Ah, my brother has the sweetest remington .22, clip fed with
a left handed bolt action. He has the same hand/eye thing
as I do.

I recall he almost lost the bolt for that thing once, he nearly
had a heart attack.

Jim

==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
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Aaron Kushner
 
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Default Winchester 62A followup

Gunner wrote:

My son is a southpaw..and the first .22 I bought for him was a
Remington 572 pump (age 8 or so).

The only realistic option for most lefthanded shooters are pump
or lever action rifles as most long guns are not made in LH
actions (with some notible exceptions)


Gunner, lefties do just fine with bolt action and semi-autos.

My left eye is much better so I typically shoot lefty. I used to
shoot DCM matches in the 450-475 range (i.e. better than average)
using an M1 fired as a lefty. Yes it is awkward reaching over
with the left hand when slinged up, but certainly doable. And
shooting smallbore left-handed with a right-hand actions isn't
much of a problem.

That said, a Vang comped 590A1 would be my first choice for
home defense ;-)


  #6   Report Post  
Gunner
 
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Default Winchester 62A followup

On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 07:00:01 GMT, Aaron Kushner
wrote:

Gunner wrote:

My son is a southpaw..and the first .22 I bought for him was a
Remington 572 pump (age 8 or so).

The only realistic option for most lefthanded shooters are pump
or lever action rifles as most long guns are not made in LH
actions (with some notible exceptions)


Gunner, lefties do just fine with bolt action and semi-autos.


Some well trained ones do, indeed. The fellow that used to beat me
regularly in Leg matches was shooting a 03A3, left handed.
But you folks are the exception, rather than the rule.

My left eye is much better so I typically shoot lefty. I used to
shoot DCM matches in the 450-475 range (i.e. better than average)
using an M1 fired as a lefty. Yes it is awkward reaching over
with the left hand when slinged up, but certainly doable. And
shooting smallbore left-handed with a right-hand actions isn't
much of a problem.


Yup. See above though.

That said, a Vang comped 590A1 would be my first choice for
home defense ;-)


G

Gunner

"A vote for Kerry is a de facto vote for bin Laden."
Strider
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