Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Grant Erwin
 
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Default electric lawn mower motor?

I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and failed, so
here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap electric lawn mower
(probably Black & Decker judging from the orange color). It's a permanent magnet
DC motor with brushes. At one end is a 5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the
other end of the shaft runs in a plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted
up in the lawn mower, and there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft.
That hole has a felt wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in
the bushing. However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end is
down, making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I see it, my
options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy because the
lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it with oilite,
which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my Bridgeport
way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?

Grant
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Jeff Wisnia
 
Posts: n/a
Default electric lawn mower motor?

Grant Erwin wrote:
I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and
failed, so here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap
electric lawn mower (probably Black & Decker judging from the orange
color). It's a permanent magnet DC motor with brushes. At one end is a
5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the other end of the shaft runs in a
plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted up in the lawn mower,
and there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft. That hole has a
felt wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in the
bushing. However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end
is down, making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I
see it, my options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy
because the lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it with
oilite, which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my
Bridgeport way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?

Grant


I think you'll find that "steel" bushing is really an oil retaining
sintered iron bearing. It's similar to Oilite, but without copper/bronze
in it so it doesn't have the characteristic color of gen-u-wine Oilite.

Check the top of the second page he

http://www.sdp-si.com/D200/PDF/D200_T16.pdf

If it wuz me, I'd just oil it up now, mount it as you described and
write a note somewhere on it to turn the motor over somehow and give it
another oiling every three years.

HTH,

Jeff





--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"Life is like a sewer -- what you get out of it depends on what you put
into it."
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Tom Gardner
 
Posts: n/a
Default electric lawn mower motor?


"Grant Erwin" wrote in message
...
I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and
failed, so here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap
electric lawn mower (probably Black & Decker judging from the orange
color). It's a permanent magnet DC motor with brushes. At one end is a
5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the other end of the shaft runs in a
plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted up in the lawn mower, and
there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft. That hole has a felt
wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in the bushing.
However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end is down,
making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I see it, my
options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy because
the lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it with
oilite, which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my
Bridgeport way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?

Grant


If you move to Australia the motor will be right-side-up.


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Posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Grant Erwin
 
Posts: n/a
Default electric lawn mower motor?

Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Grant Erwin wrote:

I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and
failed, so here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap
electric lawn mower (probably Black & Decker judging from the orange
color). It's a permanent magnet DC motor with brushes. At one end is a
5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the other end of the shaft runs in a
plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted up in the lawn mower,
and there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft. That hole has
a felt wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in the
bushing. However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end
is down, making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I
see it, my options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy
because the lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it
with oilite, which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my
Bridgeport way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?

Grant



I think you'll find that "steel" bushing is really an oil retaining
sintered iron bearing. It's similar to Oilite, but without copper/bronze
in it so it doesn't have the characteristic color of gen-u-wine Oilite.

Check the top of the second page he

http://www.sdp-si.com/D200/PDF/D200_T16.pdf

If it wuz me, I'd just oil it up now, mount it as you described and
write a note somewhere on it to turn the motor over somehow and give it
another oiling every three years.


I suppose I could use bearing grease instead of oil, should hang around that
bushing longer. Yup, I'll give that a try. Thanks, Jeff!

Grant
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Posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Robert Swinney
 
Posts: n/a
Default electric lawn mower motor?

Don't fall into the trap that sintered iron bearings are "lifetime-oil
impregnated". IME at least, some of them aren't. Cheap attic ventilator
fans, in particular - the ones I'm familiar with have sintered-iron bearings
with little perforated openings and oil channels. If you religously oil
them every year they last about 6 years. If you don't religously oil them
every year they last about 6 years.

Bob Swinney
"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
. ..
Grant Erwin wrote:
I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and
failed, so here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap
electric lawn mower (probably Black & Decker judging from the orange
color). It's a permanent magnet DC motor with brushes. At one end is a
5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the other end of the shaft runs in a
plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted up in the lawn mower, and
there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft. That hole has a felt
wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in the bushing.
However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end is down,
making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I see it, my
options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy
because the lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it with
oilite, which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my
Bridgeport way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?

Grant


I think you'll find that "steel" bushing is really an oil retaining
sintered iron bearing. It's similar to Oilite, but without copper/bronze
in it so it doesn't have the characteristic color of gen-u-wine Oilite.

Check the top of the second page he

http://www.sdp-si.com/D200/PDF/D200_T16.pdf

If it wuz me, I'd just oil it up now, mount it as you described and write
a note somewhere on it to turn the motor over somehow and give it another
oiling every three years.

HTH,

Jeff





--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"Life is like a sewer -- what you get out of it depends on what you put
into it."





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Posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Bill Cotton
 
Posts: n/a
Default electric lawn mower motor?


Bob Swinney
"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
. ..
Grant Erwin wrote:
I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and
failed, so here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap
electric lawn mower (probably Black & Decker judging from the orange
color). It's a permanent magnet DC motor with brushes. At one end is a
5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the other end of the shaft runs in a
plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted up in the lawn mower,
and there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft. That hole has a
felt wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in the
bushing. However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end
is down, making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I
see it, my options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy
because the lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it with
oilite, which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my
Bridgeport way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?

http://www.dewaltservicenet.com/Serv...ns/Default.asp
I have a CMM 1000 Black & Decker Cordless lawn mower. Above is the location
for spare parts.
I have experimented with use the motor from the lawn mower for my electric
snow blower. That story is here. http://www.billcotton.com/snow_blower.htm
Also there is a parts list from Dewalt part supply. This show a ball bearing
on both end. I looked at my motor and it seem to be only the bushing
bearing, however, I think that both are there.

--
www.billcotton.com


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Posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Grant Erwin
 
Posts: n/a
Default electric lawn mower motor?

Bill Cotton wrote:
Bob Swinney
"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
m...

Grant Erwin wrote:

I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and
failed, so here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap
electric lawn mower (probably Black & Decker judging from the orange
color). It's a permanent magnet DC motor with brushes. At one end is a
5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the other end of the shaft runs in a
plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted up in the lawn mower,
and there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft. That hole has a
felt wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in the
bushing. However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end
is down, making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I
see it, my options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy
because the lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it with
oilite, which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my
Bridgeport way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?


http://www.dewaltservicenet.com/Serv...ns/Default.asp
I have a CMM 1000 Black & Decker Cordless lawn mower. Above is the location
for spare parts.
I have experimented with use the motor from the lawn mower for my electric
snow blower. That story is here. http://www.billcotton.com/snow_blower.htm
Also there is a parts list from Dewalt part supply. This show a ball bearing
on both end. I looked at my motor and it seem to be only the bushing
bearing, however, I think that both are there.


That's a cordless lawn mower motor. It does show a ball bearing on the brush end
of the shaft. Mine with great certainty doesn't have one, though. Further, that
site is OBNOXIOUS, wants you to register, the horror ..

GWE
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Vaughn Simon
 
Posts: n/a
Default electric lawn mower motor?


"Grant Erwin" wrote in message
...
just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy because the
lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway


Now I know why my favorite B&D lawnmower so spectacularly dismantled itself
20+ years ago. It was so old that the deck had rusted away more than 180
degrees surrounding the motor and I had to rebuild the deck with fiberglass.
Shortly after I went to all that trouble, the rotating parts of the motor
suddenly became intimate with the non-rotating parts.

Those PM motors ought to make great DC generators. I always wanted to try
that.

Vaughn



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Posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Gunner
 
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Default electric lawn mower motor?

On Fri, 26 May 2006 17:06:57 -0700, Grant Erwin
wrote:

Bill Cotton wrote:
Bob Swinney
"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
om...

Grant Erwin wrote:

I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and
failed, so here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap
electric lawn mower (probably Black & Decker judging from the orange
color). It's a permanent magnet DC motor with brushes. At one end is a
5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the other end of the shaft runs in a
plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted up in the lawn mower,
and there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft. That hole has a
felt wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in the
bushing. However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end
is down, making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I
see it, my options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy
because the lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it with
oilite, which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my
Bridgeport way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?


http://www.dewaltservicenet.com/Serv...ns/Default.asp
I have a CMM 1000 Black & Decker Cordless lawn mower. Above is the location
for spare parts.
I have experimented with use the motor from the lawn mower for my electric
snow blower. That story is here. http://www.billcotton.com/snow_blower.htm
Also there is a parts list from Dewalt part supply. This show a ball bearing
on both end. I looked at my motor and it seem to be only the bushing
bearing, however, I think that both are there.


That's a cordless lawn mower motor. It does show a ball bearing on the brush end
of the shaft. Mine with great certainty doesn't have one, though. Further, that
site is OBNOXIOUS, wants you to register, the horror ..

GWE


If anyone really wants to make a decent lawnmower..Ive got a good
selection of C faced 3ph motors up to 5hp and 3750 rpm.

The extension cord may be a bit tiresome to pull around on the bigger
motors..but they would be quiet, reliable and could swing a decent
sized blade. Perhaps one made from the rear leaf springs from a
Mercedes...truck.

Gunner

"If thy pride is sorely vexed when others disparage your offering, be
as lamb's wool is to cold rain and the Gore-tex of Odin's raiment
is to gull**** in the gale, for thy angst shall vex them not at
all. Yea, they shall scorn thee all the more. Rejoice in
sharing what you have to share without expectation of adoration,
knowing that sharing your treasure does not diminish your treasure
but enriches it."

- Onni 1:33
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Posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
Bill Cotton
 
Posts: n/a
Default electric lawn mower motor?


"Grant Erwin" wrote in message
...
Bill Cotton wrote:
Bob Swinney
"Jeff Wisnia" wrote in message
om...

Grant Erwin wrote:

I have a feeling this question has come up before, but I googled and
failed, so here it is anyway. I have a motor I scrounged from a scrap
electric lawn mower (probably Black & Decker judging from the orange
color). It's a permanent magnet DC motor with brushes. At one end is a
5/8x1-3/8x7/16" ball bearing, and the other end of the shaft runs in a
plain steel bushing. The bushing end is mounted up in the lawn mower,
and there is an oiling hole above the end of the shaft. That hole has a
felt wick in it, so it is possible to oil the shaft running in the
bushing. However, I want to run this motor oriented so the bushing end
is down, making oiling it through the wick by gravity unfeasible. As I
see it, my options a

just run it anyway, it will probably have the same life expectancy
because the lawn mower user probably never oiled it anyway

try to get the bushing out of the plastic end piece and replace it with
oilite, which is self-lubricating

try to epoxy on a lube fitting of some kind which I could use with my
Bridgeport way oiler gun to force oil up in there

Anyone had this problem and solved it?


http://www.dewaltservicenet.com/Serv...ns/Default.asp
I have a CMM 1000 Black & Decker Cordless lawn mower. Above is the
location for spare parts.
I have experimented with use the motor from the lawn mower for my
electric snow blower. That story is here.
http://www.billcotton.com/snow_blower.htm Also there is a parts list from
Dewalt part supply. This show a ball bearing on both end. I looked at my
motor and it seem to be only the bushing bearing, however, I think that
both are there.


That's a cordless lawn mower motor. It does show a ball bearing on the
brush end of the shaft. Mine with great certainty doesn't have one,
though. Further, that site is OBNOXIOUS, wants you to register, the horror
..

GWE

Opps, I was waiting to post my project and when I saw DC motor I jumped.
However, I did input a electric lawn mower to the site and it shows one
bearing on the motor.
In the Philly area we have a Dewalt repair shop, B&D repair center and
several others authorized repair center for Black and Decker tools. The
Dewalt center in Philly has a retired machinist doing repairs. A call to a
center may get more information.


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