Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old July 11th 05, 12:20 PM
Robert Latest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Properties of "coin silver"?

Hello,

does anybody know what, exactly, "coin silver" is (I found something
like 90% silver 10% copper, but are there other standards), and what its
mechanical properties are?

I'm looking for a replacement/alternative alloy for CuSn6 for
low-temperature, non-magnetic applications.

Thanks,
robert

  #2   Report Post  
Old July 11th 05, 03:10 PM
jim rozen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Robert Latest says...

Hello,

does anybody know what, exactly, "coin silver" is (I found something
like 90% silver 10% copper, but are there other standards), and what its
mechanical properties are?

I'm looking for a replacement/alternative alloy for CuSn6 for
low-temperature, non-magnetic applications.


I thought 'coin silver' had a lot of nickel in it.

You might want to talk to a low-temperature engineer who's had
experiences with non-magnetic materials. If you need something
structural a common alloy is cupronickel, the nickel does not
form a local moment below about 20 percent or so.

What's your specific application, and how low do you need the
moment to be?

Jim


--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
  #3   Report Post  
Old July 11th 05, 04:41 PM
Dave Hinz
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 11 Jul 2005 07:10:01 -0700, jim rozen wrote:
In article , Robert Latest says...

Hello,

does anybody know what, exactly, "coin silver" is (I found something
like 90% silver 10% copper, but are there other standards), and what its
mechanical properties are?


I thought 'coin silver' had a lot of nickel in it.


The country of the coins will be central to getting a good answer. If
it's USA'n, then I'm sure there are FAQs out there which google could
scare up for him. Other large countries as well, I would think.

  #4   Report Post  
Old July 11th 05, 05:52 PM
Harold and Susan Vordos
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"jim rozen" wrote in message
...
In article , Robert Latest says...

Hello,

does anybody know what, exactly, "coin silver" is (I found something
like 90% silver 10% copper, but are there other standards), and what its
mechanical properties are?

I'm looking for a replacement/alternative alloy for CuSn6 for
low-temperature, non-magnetic applications.


I thought 'coin silver' had a lot of nickel in it.


Nope------it's 10% copper, 90% silver, at least here in the US. It was the
standard for striking silver coins, likely the reason it's called *coin
silver*. Canada uses a lower silver content, I think 80%. Other
countries use varying percentages.

There is no nickel in coin silver, never has been, although nickels, during
the war years, were made from silver and manganese, with no nickel content.
It's easy to distinguish the war years nickels (aside from looking at the
dates) because the mint marks are very large. Likely none left in
circulation now, though. They were probably all taken out of circulation
when the silver content exceeded their face value, in the same manner the
rest of our silver coinage experienced.

Harold


  #5   Report Post  
Old July 11th 05, 06:02 PM
Dave Hinz
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 09:52:08 -0700, Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

There is no nickel in coin silver, never has been, although nickels, during
the war years, were made from silver and manganese, with no nickel content.
It's easy to distinguish the war years nickels (aside from looking at the
dates) because the mint marks are very large. Likely none left in
circulation now, though.


I find one every 5 years or so in circulation. Instantly recognizable
due to the green-ish coloration.




  #6   Report Post  
Old July 11th 05, 11:32 PM
jim rozen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Harold and Susan Vordos says...

I thought 'coin silver' had a lot of nickel in it.


Nope------it's 10% copper, 90% silver, at least here in the US. It was the
standard for striking silver coins, likely the reason it's called *coin
silver*. Canada uses a lower silver content, I think 80%. Other
countries use varying percentages.

There is no nickel in coin silver, never has been, although nickels, during
the war years, were made from silver and manganese, with no nickel content.
It's easy to distinguish the war years nickels (aside from looking at the
dates) because the mint marks are very large. Likely none left in
circulation now, though. They were probably all taken out of circulation
when the silver content exceeded their face value, in the same manner the
rest of our silver coinage experienced.


The term "coin silver" has a specific meaning when used in the electrical
contact industry - and that is quite different than the term when used
in numismatic terms.

I seem to recall that somebody on RCM a long time ago researched this,
and found there was an appreciable amount of Ni in electrical contacts
that were called 'coin silver' and the term had its roots in germany
from long ago.

I suspect the original poster was not refering to silver gotten from
coins for his apparatus. The term seems to be a bit vague, but the
90/10 cu/ag number you cite seems pretty much the standard. If
that meets his needs, it will of course be non-magnetic - but there
may be other more mechanically desirable materials out there.

I still seem to remember somebody here posted historic details
on that alloy that included Ni though.

Jim


--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
  #7   Report Post  
Old July 11th 05, 11:57 PM
Nick Müller
 
Posts: n/a
Default

jim rozen wrote:

and found there was an appreciable amount of Ni in electrical contacts
that were called 'coin silver' and the term had its roots in germany
from long ago.


Are you shure that you don't confuse this with "new silveer" (Neusilber)
that has no silver at all. It is als called Alpaka:

77-30% copper
11-26% nickel
12-44% Zinc

and is used for contacts.

just guessing. If I'm off, ignore me.

Nick
--
Motormodelle / Engine Models:
http://www.motor-manufaktur.de
Ellwe 2FB * VTM 87 * DLM-S3a * cubic
more to come ...
  #8   Report Post  
Old July 12th 05, 12:44 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 11 Jul 2005 15:32:26 -0700, jim rozen
wrote:

In article , Harold and Susan Vordos says...

I thought 'coin silver' had a lot of nickel in it.


Nope------it's 10% copper, 90% silver, at least here in the US. It was the
standard for striking silver coins, likely the reason it's called *coin
silver*. Canada uses a lower silver content, I think 80%. Other
countries use varying percentages.

There is no nickel in coin silver, never has been, although nickels, during
the war years, were made from silver and manganese, with no nickel content.
It's easy to distinguish the war years nickels (aside from looking at the
dates) because the mint marks are very large. Likely none left in
circulation now, though. They were probably all taken out of circulation
when the silver content exceeded their face value, in the same manner the
rest of our silver coinage experienced.


The term "coin silver" has a specific meaning when used in the electrical
contact industry - and that is quite different than the term when used
in numismatic terms.

I seem to recall that somebody on RCM a long time ago researched this,
and found there was an appreciable amount of Ni in electrical contacts
that were called 'coin silver' and the term had its roots in germany
from long ago.

I suspect the original poster was not refering to silver gotten from
coins for his apparatus. The term seems to be a bit vague, but the
90/10 cu/ag number you cite seems pretty much the standard. If
that meets his needs, it will of course be non-magnetic - but there
may be other more mechanically desirable materials out there.

I still seem to remember somebody here posted historic details
on that alloy that included Ni though.

Jim



Okay, In the interest of the straight poop, I rummaged around and
found my copy of "Butts & Coxe" A lieberal and queer pair of
metalurgists (stolen from another thread) who wrote "Silver Economics,
Metalurgy and Use", VanNostrand, 1967

In their list of "Silver alloys frequently used as electrical
contacts" they list "Coin silver" as 90% Ag, 10% Cu.

While they obviously do not list every alloy ever used for electrical
contacts, the highest nickle content in any of the 15 alloys they have
listed is .5%.

Of course these don't show composite type contacts, where the silver
may be laminated unto a nickle substrate.

Now, to the original poster, while I have this book out, the word
"properties" covers a lot of territory. Exactly which properties are
you interested in.

Paul K. Dickman
  #10   Report Post  
Old July 12th 05, 04:03 PM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 12 Jul 2005 09:33:07 GMT, Robert Latest
wrote:

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 18:44:01 -0500,
wrote
in Msg.

Now, to the original poster, while I have this book out, the word
"properties" covers a lot of territory. Exactly which properties are
you interested in.


Mechanical as regards strength, hardness, and machineability.

Thanks,
robert



Hardness Rockwell 15T, annealed 70, cold worked 83
Electrical conductivity %IACS 85
Ultimate tensile strength (psi), annealed 40000, cold worked, 75000
Elongation % in 2in , annealed 32, cold worked, 4

As to machinability, they do not list it, so this info is anecdotal
based on my own limited experience.

Fine silver maccines about like copper.
Sterling silver machines about like 260 brass
Coin silver machines slightly better.

Paul K. Dickman


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Silver tube casting. [email protected] Metalworking 10 July 3rd 05 09:31 PM
silver solder for silver "plating"? jtaylor Metalworking 5 June 7th 05 08:19 PM
soldering to brass Grant Erwin Metalworking 16 April 29th 04 04:54 AM
Gold and Silver Roy's Junk Metalworking 24 December 26th 03 09:47 PM
silver and deming vs. reduced shank? FixerDave Metalworking 7 December 2nd 03 07:17 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:03 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2017 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017