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Old March 13th 05, 10:14 PM
Way Back Jack
 
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Default Home Generator / Automatic Transfer Switch

It's 15kw and the available automatic transfer switch comes in 8, 10,
or 12 circuit versions.

Why would you choose a switch with 8 or 10 circuit capability if your
generator supports 12?

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Old March 13th 05, 10:24 PM
toller
 
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Why would you choose a switch with 8 or 10 circuit capability if your
generator supports 12?


Cause you simply don't have more than 8 circuits you need to power during a
blackout; and all the extra wiring fills up your breaker box pretty fast.
I have a 6 circuit transfer switch and had trouble deciding on the 5th and
6th circuits, as I only really wanted 4.


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Old March 13th 05, 10:24 PM
Greg O
 
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"Way Back Jack" wrote in message
...
It's 15kw and the available automatic transfer switch comes in 8, 10,
or 12 circuit versions.

Why would you choose a switch with 8 or 10 circuit capability if your
generator supports 12?


Price?
You only need 8?
Greg


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Old March 13th 05, 10:53 PM
Way Back Jack
 
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On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 22:24:14 GMT, "toller" wrote:


Why would you choose a switch with 8 or 10 circuit capability if your
generator supports 12?


Cause you simply don't have more than 8 circuits you need to power during a
blackout; and all the extra wiring fills up your breaker box pretty fast.
I have a 6 circuit transfer switch and had trouble deciding on the 5th and
6th circuits, as I only really wanted 4.


OK, in your estimation, how many circuits would be typically involved
in this bare-bones scenario:

Refrigerator; oil-fired furnace; well/water storage tank; water
neutralizer/softener; water heater; sump-pump.

Thanx, Jack
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Old March 14th 05, 12:02 AM
toller
 
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"Way Back Jack" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 22:24:14 GMT, "toller" wrote:


Why would you choose a switch with 8 or 10 circuit capability if your
generator supports 12?


Cause you simply don't have more than 8 circuits you need to power during
a
blackout; and all the extra wiring fills up your breaker box pretty fast.
I have a 6 circuit transfer switch and had trouble deciding on the 5th and
6th circuits, as I only really wanted 4.


OK, in your estimation, how many circuits would be typically involved
in this bare-bones scenario:

Refrigerator; oil-fired furnace; well/water storage tank; water
neutralizer/softener; water heater; sump-pump.

If the water heater is 240v, then you have 7 circuits there. All these
items should be on their own circuit. Or is this a trick question?
Adding one circuit for some lights and your TV gets you to 8.
(I don't have a water heater, sumppump, well, or softener; so 4 was plenty
for me.)




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Old March 14th 05, 01:24 AM
Way Back Jack
 
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On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 00:02:46 GMT, "toller" wrote:


"Way Back Jack" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 22:24:14 GMT, "toller" wrote:


Why would you choose a switch with 8 or 10 circuit capability if your
generator supports 12?

Cause you simply don't have more than 8 circuits you need to power during
a
blackout; and all the extra wiring fills up your breaker box pretty fast.
I have a 6 circuit transfer switch and had trouble deciding on the 5th and
6th circuits, as I only really wanted 4.


OK, in your estimation, how many circuits would be typically involved
in this bare-bones scenario:

Refrigerator; oil-fired furnace; well/water storage tank; water
neutralizer/softener; water heater; sump-pump.

If the water heater is 240v, then you have 7 circuits there. All these
items should be on their own circuit. Or is this a trick question?
Adding one circuit for some lights and your TV gets you to 8.
(I don't have a water heater, sumppump, well, or softener; so 4 was plenty
for me.)


No trick question. I'm just stupid on these issues and trying to
learn. Thanks.

Jack
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Old March 14th 05, 01:39 AM
Doug Miller
 
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In article [email protected] news, (Way Back Jack) wrote:
On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 00:02:46 GMT, "toller" wrote:
"Way Back Jack" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 22:24:14 GMT, "toller" wrote:
Why would you choose a switch with 8 or 10 circuit capability if your
generator supports 12?

Cause you simply don't have more than 8 circuits you need to power during
a
blackout; and all the extra wiring fills up your breaker box pretty fast.
I have a 6 circuit transfer switch and had trouble deciding on the 5th and
6th circuits, as I only really wanted 4.

OK, in your estimation, how many circuits would be typically involved
in this bare-bones scenario:

Refrigerator; oil-fired furnace; well/water storage tank; water
neutralizer/softener; water heater; sump-pump.


Water softener is obviously not a critical device.

If the water heater is 240v, then you have 7 circuits there.


No, six circuits. But two of them are 240V circuits (the water heater, and the
well pump). Five if you subtract the unnecessary water softener.

All these
items should be on their own circuit. Or is this a trick question?


That's just silly. There's no need to put each of these on its own circuit.
Neither a furnace blower nor a sump pump is a particularly high-current
device, so these two could share a circuit, and still have capacity left to
support lights or outlets. And a water softener draws hardly any current, so
it could share a 120V circuit with any of the other loads.

Adding one circuit for some lights and your TV gets you to 8.


Lights can share a circuit with either the refrigerator or the furnace and
sump pump, as long as you don't try to turn night into day.

So a more realistic count at this point is
two 240V circuits:
- water heater
- well pump
two 120V circuits
- oil furnace + sump pump + optional water softener + a few outlets
- refrigerator + some lights

(I don't have a water heater, sumppump, well, or softener; so 4 was plenty
for me.)


I *hope* you mean you don't have an *electric* water heater... ;-)

No trick question. I'm just stupid on these issues and trying to
learn. Thanks.


No, not "stupid". Uninformed.

Ignorance can be cured, but stupidity is forever.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt.
And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Old March 14th 05, 02:27 AM
m Ransley
 
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240v takes 2 transfer panel circuits, Sumps, refrigerator, water
sofener etc etc, get a clamp on amp meter and measre start up peak-surge
and run load, dont guess or read the labels, measure it. Refrigerators
can pull as little as 350 surge and 100 running or 1300 surge and 600
running., Surge load is critical with a gen, surge can be 8 times run
load, but is usualy 4-6 times. Figure it wrong and you will ruin your
gen. Even if it is a auto panel you dont want all loads comming on at
the same time. You also will have 2 amp meters, you need to balance your
load for max gen life. I like manual panels, I can monitor usage and
balance the load. Also what brand is your generator and what is run load
and peak load . Is furnace modern with a circuit board. A rough guess
you could have a 50-60 Amp surge with what you mentioned Your gen may
not handle it and die on startup or burn up trying. figure your startup
load and run load first. Any high draw motor give it is own circuit.
Your 2 - 240 v will take 4 circuits.

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Old March 14th 05, 02:28 AM
m Ransley
 
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Each generator leg puts out 120, so balancing is important.

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Old March 14th 05, 02:56 AM
stretch
 
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The refrigerator should always have it's own circuit per code. Same
with the furnace and water heater.


Stretch



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