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Default Receptacle in bathroom lighting fixture

Is it possible to obtain one of these now? I don't see them in the
stores. Actually there is nothing wrong with the one that I have, it's
just that I'd like to add one or two receptacles to mine, but I was
just wondering why I don't see them in the stores now.

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Colbyt
 
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wrote in message
oups.com...
Is it possible to obtain one of these now? I don't see them in the
stores. Actually there is nothing wrong with the one that I have, it's
just that I'd like to add one or two receptacles to mine, but I was
just wondering why I don't see them in the stores now.


GFIC protection is required in bathrooms. These things are not considered
safe. To sell them would entail a lot of potential product liability issues.

For the safety of your family you should consider getting this upgraded.


Colbyt


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Is it possible to obtain one of these now? I don't see them in the
stores. Actually there is nothing wrong with the one that I have, it's
just that I'd like to add one or two receptacles to mine, but I was
just wondering why I don't see them in the stores now.


GFIC protection is required in bathrooms. These things are not considered
safe. To sell them would entail a lot of potential product liability issues.


So you feed the whole thing off the load side of a GFCI outlet,
or (if you're going on to too many other outlets*) a GFCI breaker.
BFD.

But I can't think of any particular reason why you'd want to add recepticals
to an existing vanity-fixture, rather than just adding a normal duplex box
at each end of the counter. The latter way, all the electric crap that you
leave
plugged in all the time can be shoved off to the ends of the counter,
rather than cluttering up the middle.

--Goedjn

* What's the point of limiting the load-side of a GFCI outlet to
4 additional devices, anyway? It's not like you can't suck the
whole 20 amps out of one plug down the line with a hair-dryer..
Is it just so that you don't have to hunt back through 12 boxes
to find the problem when it blows?


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Pop
 
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....

GFIC protection is required in bathrooms. These things are
not
considered safe. To sell them would entail a lot of potential
product liability issues.

....

That's in incredible load of bunk! Installed to code, there is
absolutely NOTHING wrong and no increased liablity at all. And
if not installed to code, then the liability is nil; nothing to
do with anything since it's the homeowner's responsibility.

Last time I was in my local True Value, I saw several with
receptables: from one on one end to one at each end, even one
big expensive one with three receptacles; there would have been
4, but one was used for the switch.

Please get your facts straight.

Pop


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Jeff Wisnia
 
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

wrote:

Is it possible to obtain one of these now? I don't see them in the
stores. Actually there is nothing wrong with the one that I have, it's
just that I'd like to add one or two receptacles to mine, but I was
just wondering why I don't see them in the stores now.


You probably don't see them for sale anymore because when you use them
you get in effect an "old fashioned" two blade socket without a ground
pin hole. The potential liability for a manufacturer probably
discourages them from making the limited number which could be sold
these days.

Also things have changed a lot since the days when electricity was used
in homes almost solely to provide lighting, and homes were built with
few if any wall recepticals, hence the usefullness of those adaptors.

I think I've got a couple in my "hell box" but haven't had any
application for them in years.

Follow the other guy's warnings, if the fixture is not protected by a
GFI device, you'd be well advised to make it so.

Happy Holidays,

Jeff


Looks like maybe I misunderstood your OP. I took it to mean you were
looking for those things about the size and shape of an old glass fuse
which screwed into a lightbulb socket and turned it into a two blade
plug receptical.

Sounds to me now like you want a light fixture with regular grounding
recepticals mounted right on it.

Jeff

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
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Colbyt
 
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"Pop" wrote in message
...
...

GFIC protection is required in bathrooms. These things are
not
considered safe. To sell them would entail a lot of potential
product liability issues.

...

That's in incredible load of bunk! Installed to code, there is
absolutely NOTHING wrong and no increased liablity at all. And
if not installed to code, then the liability is nil; nothing to
do with anything since it's the homeowner's responsibility.

Last time I was in my local True Value, I saw several with
receptables: from one on one end to one at each end, even one
big expensive one with three receptacles; there would have been
4, but one was used for the switch.

Please get your facts straight.

Pop


I don't buy electrical supplies at True Value.

None of the stores that I shop at in this area carry them.

You would need to GFIC the circuit to be safe.

And even then when you plug that 1600 watt hair dryer in you run the risk of
frying those #16 wires that are inside the fixture.

Code enforcement won't allow them in rental property in this area. Period.


Colbyt


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It is a grounded receptacle in the light fixture! I just want more.
It's the only place where I can add them without tearing up my walls.
Plus my bathroom is tiny so space is a problem. If I could add a GFCI
to the light ficture, I would, but they are huge and there is no room
for that (unless I can stuff it in the wall behind the light fixture,
but then there is no test and reset switch).

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Matt
 
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Scott -

Assuming you could get them (and you can, I'm sure HD carries them) -
where would you mount it? Were you thinking of cutting a notch out of
the light fixture? If that's the case, why not just get a GFI power
strip, plug your appliances into it, and then plug it into the light
fixture when needed?

Also - keep in mind that just because your light fixture has a grounded
outlet - that doesn't necessarily mean that the ground terminal is
actually hooked to anything....... if your house is over 35 years old
or so, I'd say it probably isn't.

Basically, you've got 2 options:

1) Hack something together and hope for the best.
2) Pay the $$ to do the job right (have a new outlet added and home run
to the electrical panel).

I know, I know - money is tight. But when you are lying in helpless
convulsions on the bathroom floor as 120V has it's way with you, or
perhaps your house catches fire due to faulty wiring - you will really
wish that you had spent the $$. Well, maybe for a few moments anyway.

Not trying to be an ass - but this is a basic lesson that many people
died learning.

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Pop
 
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wrote:
It is a grounded receptacle in the light fixture! I just want
more.
It's the only place where I can add them without tearing up my
walls.
Plus my bathroom is tiny so space is a problem. If I could
add a
GFCI to the light ficture, I would, but they are huge and
there is
no room for that (unless I can stuff it in the wall behind the
light
fixture, but then there is no test and reset switch).


GFCI: There are "portable" GFCIs available: You plug them into
an outlet, and the plug whatever you want protected into it.
They only have one receptacle but have the usual test/reset
switches. About $7 last I noticed at True Value.

MORE OUTLETS:
Think about a power strip. Find a place to mount a power strip
and plug in up to 6 more things in it. Most power strips have a
switch to turn them off, and a ten amp breaker.

Put a portable GFCI on the existing light fixture, plug the power
strip into it. Now anything plugged into the power strip is
protected, plus you've got up to 6 more outlets available. It
won't help the existing fixture, but, even if it's not grounded
at the third pin (and neither will the power strip be in that
case), the GFCI will still protect the power strip outlets.
Code usually says an extension cord is only to be used for
thirty days max, but when I had my inspection done about two
years ago, no mentio of any problems with the power strips in my
computer room or out in my shop except to count the number of
total receptacles.

HTH,

Pop




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"And even then when you plug that 1600 watt hair dryer in you run the
risk of frying those #16 wires that are inside the fixture."

Which is why I'm going to replace the wires with something better. Now
can we get back on topic? I don't need GFCI's in a 1950 home anyway
(got them in places where they were easy to install, but one doesn't
have to retrofit every time the electrical code shanges).

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"I know, I know - money is tight. But when you are lying in helpless
convulsions on the bathroom floor as 120V has it's way with you, or
perhaps your house catches fire due to faulty wiring - you will really
wish that you had spent the $$. Well, maybe for a few moments anyway."

Umm, I used to design and build power plants as en electrical engineer
for a living. Before that I was an electronics technician for years.
I doubt that I could hire a contracter that is smarter or that will do
a better job than me (or one that speaks English). Now exactly what
are your qualifications?

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"Also - keep in mind that just because your light fixture has a
grounded
outlet - that doesn't necessarily mean that the ground terminal is
actually hooked to anything....... if your house is over 35 years old
or so, I'd say it probably isn't"
All of my ground terminals work, I have checked them.

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Jeff Wisnia
 
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wrote:

It is a grounded receptacle in the light fixture! I just want more.
It's the only place where I can add them without tearing up my walls.
Plus my bathroom is tiny so space is a problem. If I could add a GFCI
to the light ficture, I would, but they are huge and there is no room
for that (unless I can stuff it in the wall behind the light fixture,
but then there is no test and reset switch).



At the risk of having missed something on this thread, is there a reason
you couldn't install a GFCI breaker in the main panel - for the circuit
feeding that fixture?

Assuming of course that the place isn't so old it's still got a "fuse box".

I'm no big fan of panel mounted GFCIs myself, it can be too damned hard
to track down where along the road some slight electrical leakage is
causing nuisance tripping, as in damp weather.

As built, our house had one GFCI breaker in the panel which serviced
three bathrooms' recipticals and an exterior plug receptical, plus two
small bathroom vent fans. The vent fan motors would sometimes leak
enough after a steamy shower to trip the breaker, and I got ****ed at
having to run down two flights of stairs bare assed and dripping to
reset the breaker.

I prefer to use GFCI outlets wherever there is a possibility that a
person could get in trouble, which is what I've done inside and out
throughout our house.

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
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Umm, I used to design and build power plants as en electrical engineer
for a living. Before that I was an electronics technician for years.
I doubt that I could hire a contracter that is smarter or that will do
a better job than me (or one that speaks English). Now exactly what
are your qualifications?


If you're that good, then putting a normal GFCI Duplex outlet in the wall
on it's own circut shouldn't be beyond you.



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"At the risk of having missed something on this thread, is there a
reason you couldn't install a GFCI breaker in the main panel - for the
circuit feeding that fixture?"

One 15A feeder for the whole upper floor of the house. Think 1950. I
don't want a GFCI for a whole floor in the house and don't have the
spare room in my electrical panel for something that big. I did put
one in for the kitchen so I do know about how much space they take up.
Besides that, you don't need GFCI for a house built in 1950. Code
doesn't require a retrofit. We are getting way off topic here.

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"If you're that good, then putting a normal GFCI Duplex outlet in the
wall
on it's own circut shouldn't be beyond you."

I'm not interested in doing that unless I'm tearing up my walls for
something else anyway. Why would I want to do that when I can add them
to my might fixture (which is in a more convenient location anyway).
My house is less than 14' wide, minus the stairs and hallway and you
get the idea about how long my bathroom is. Now can we get back on
topic as to why no receptacles in light fixtures?

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Matt
 
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Wow.

Reading through all the replies, and most especially scott's, I've
concluded:

Scott is an electrical engineer who lives in a 14 foot wide house built
in 1950.

Hey scott, did you design Chernobyl? Cool design, man.

Now, back on topic - as you wish:

Go to home depot, buy about 25 of the snap in type outlets, just like
the one on your fixture. Cut 25 holes in your fixture, and snap them
all in. Make sure you get the wiring right!!!!

Better yet, wad them all up into a ball, and shove em up your ass.
If you don't want people's advice - don't ask for it, ****wad.

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get the idea about how long my bathroom is. Now can we get back on
topic as to why no receptacles in light fixtures?


Because you decline to go the places that have them.
--Goedjn

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