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Old August 2nd 20, 01:39 AM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.survival,alt.slack
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On 8/1/2020 7:44 AM, Lindgs wrote:
I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture.* The old* one was
difficult
to remove.* The new one will not totally seat in the fixture.* Can some
kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?


Thank you for the question Lindgs. Indeed you may use the proper lube
to make this tube "slid right in." I've found K-Y Jelly is good for
just such a jam, and the nice thing is any leftovers can be used on your
anus.

Hope this helps. 💋

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Old August 2nd 20, 02:47 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On 08/01/2020 06:30 PM, wrote:
Also pay attention to the color. LEDs come anything from a warm 2700k
to an arc light "stalag 17" 6000k maybe even "hotter".


I like the Stalag 17 setting. The cataracts introduce enough yellow into
my life without the warm candlelight effect.

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Old August 2nd 20, 09:41 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default lowbrowwoman, Birdbrain's eternal senile whore!

On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 19:47:09 -0600, lowbrowwoman, the endlessly driveling,
troll-feeding, senile idiot, blabbered again:


I like the Stalag 17 setting. The cataracts introduce enough yellow into
my life without the warm candlelight effect.


Obviously not enough to stop you from spreading your endless bull**** on
Usenet, lowbrowwoman!
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Old August 2nd 20, 02:01 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 10:44:05 AM UTC-4, Lindgs wrote:
I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture. The old one was difficult
to remove. The new one will not totally seat in the fixture. Can some kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/mainte...t-1225749-.htm


I do not believe lubrication will help.

If you get tube lined up exactly and push straight in then turn, it should fit.

If it doesn't something is worn or broken, and lubrication will not help.

But getting them really straight without twisting or angling is usually the problem.

Also check the pins, you could have a bad tube. I've never seen one but it seems logical it could happen.

I converted to LED tubes - disconnected the ballast and discarded. It turned out my tombstones were nonshunted so I didn't even need to replace but you do need to check that. I'm happy with them so far. And I put the LED shoplights in my shed, and now in the winter they come on right away, unlike the fluorescent that can't handle the cold.


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Old August 2nd 20, 03:51 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 8:31:12 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 13:26:51 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 11:41:24 AM UTC-4, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On 8/1/20 9:44 AM, Lindgs wrote:
I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture.* The old* one was
difficult
to remove.* The new one will not totally seat in the fixture.* Can some
kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?

I think what you're after is called conductive grease. Something
like this:
https://www.amazon.com/NO-OX-ID-Tube-Special-Grease-Compound/dp/B00HSW341A/ref=sr_1_40?crid=3C8MFDS7V4KG9&dchild=1&keywords=c onductive+grease&qid=1596296036&sprefix=conductive +gr%2Caps%2C193&sr=8-40

or
https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3duq8vy

The makers of that stuff are pretty proud of it price wise.
You don't want dielectric grease which is non conductive.


ACtually, I think dielectric grease is what you would want to use. It's
what's used in auto lamp holders for example. Conductive grease would
create a current path. Dielectric grease works by keeping it lubricated
so it won't corrode, but it gets easily pressed out of the way of the
contact point so a good contact is made.

Bit I've yet to see a tube fixture that needed it. I'd suspect if you
put the bulb in correctly and twist, it will seat. Sometimes they can
be tricky, not sure grease will help. And agree that if it were my fixture,
I'd be looking at a new LED fixture as the first choice, or maybe a
retrofit if it can't be changed easily. They don't cost much, sure look
and work a lot better and use less electricity.



I lot depends on the fixture itself. If it was cheap to begin with,
buying a new LED ready to go is probably right but for the same amount
of work you can just hot wire the tombstones, remove the ballast and
use the direct wire LED. That is certainly a better idea if this is
some kind of designer fixture you really like.


Designer fixture and fluorescent tubes does not compute.





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Old August 2nd 20, 11:28 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On Sun, 2 Aug 2020 07:51:29 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 8:31:12 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 13:26:51 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 11:41:24 AM UTC-4, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On 8/1/20 9:44 AM, Lindgs wrote:
I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture.* The old* one was
difficult
to remove.* The new one will not totally seat in the fixture.* Can some
kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?

I think what you're after is called conductive grease. Something
like this:
https://www.amazon.com/NO-OX-ID-Tube-Special-Grease-Compound/dp/B00HSW341A/ref=sr_1_40?crid=3C8MFDS7V4KG9&dchild=1&keywords=c onductive+grease&qid=1596296036&sprefix=conductive +gr%2Caps%2C193&sr=8-40

or
https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3duq8vy

The makers of that stuff are pretty proud of it price wise.
You don't want dielectric grease which is non conductive.

ACtually, I think dielectric grease is what you would want to use. It's
what's used in auto lamp holders for example. Conductive grease would
create a current path. Dielectric grease works by keeping it lubricated
so it won't corrode, but it gets easily pressed out of the way of the
contact point so a good contact is made.

Bit I've yet to see a tube fixture that needed it. I'd suspect if you
put the bulb in correctly and twist, it will seat. Sometimes they can
be tricky, not sure grease will help. And agree that if it were my fixture,
I'd be looking at a new LED fixture as the first choice, or maybe a
retrofit if it can't be changed easily. They don't cost much, sure look
and work a lot better and use less electricity.



I lot depends on the fixture itself. If it was cheap to begin with,
buying a new LED ready to go is probably right but for the same amount
of work you can just hot wire the tombstones, remove the ballast and
use the direct wire LED. That is certainly a better idea if this is
some kind of designer fixture you really like.


Designer fixture and fluorescent tubes does not compute.


You don't know my wife. I think she spent $100 on the one in our
closet in the late 90s. It may not have actually cost her that much
but that was the MSRP. She worked for in interior design place at the
time. I wasn't involved. I just put it up. It is an industrial quality
ballast and good tombstones. Not the junk you got in $20-30 "shop
lights".


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