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Default Why are stairlifts so slow?

On Sun, 14 Jun 2020 12:09:30 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 14/6/20 3:36 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 13 Jun 2020 18:31:40 +0100, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:19:43 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 12/6/20 1:33 pm, Rod Speed wrote:


"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 6/11/2020 9:42 PM, Xeno wrote:
On 12/6/20 7:11 am, Rod Speed wrote:


"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 03:58:37 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 9/6/20 2:55 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Fri, 22 May 2020 22:26:09 +0100, Sam E
wrote:

On 5/21/20 12:45 PM, Rod Speed wrote:

[snip]

Or maybe they realise that anyone with an incontence
problem would have something to **** in which isnt upstairs.

I consider it a bad idea to have a multi-level house without
even a half
bathroom on each level.

But if you bought the house when you were 20....

I am living in my 4th purchased item of real estate. A house
purchased
in my 20s would not suit my current needs. I sell and buy as my
needs
change through life.

I guess you're one of those who somehow managed to pay off the
mortgage of the 1st three.

You don't have to have paid off the mortgage to be able to change
houses, stupid.

True. We just put all our efforts into paying our mortgage(s) off
asap.


Wow, I have to thank Mr. Rod for the laugh calling you stupid for
paying off your mortgage.

I didn't, I called the PHucker stupid for being so pig ignorant,
stupid.

You, Rod, are the pig ignorant one. *You* introduced the topic of
selling houses before paying off mortgages hence it is your *skew
factor*, not mine. I am aware of that ability but it was *not relevant*
to my response or the poster to whom I was replying. I was merely
responding to an assumption, correct though it surely was, by another
poster. *You* came barging in acting like a dick, as you often do.

On my third house and, of course, no mortgage.* My secont house
started at 15% and re-fi a couple of times.* Can't say I've done
everything right over the years but I knew retirement would be much
better with no debt.

A LOT of prople switch houses numerous times without ever paying off a
mortgage


I don't see the point.* You pick a house you like, then upgrade if and
when you can afford it.* That would only be once you've paid off your
mortgage entirely, otherwise you're just getting deeper into debt.


Needs and circumstances change at will and rarely when you have paid off
the mortgage.

- moving up, moving sideways, or moving down.


DOWN!?* Intolerable to move to a smaller space.


Retirees and empty nesters do it all the time. I went slightly
differently, smaller block of land, larger house.

It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%.


Wow!* When was it that high?* I thought mortgages had always been 3-6%.

Early 80s they peaked at about 24%

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.


So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!


No, we sold a $50,000 house to buy a $67000 house. What equity we had
in the old house plus the existing transferable mortgate on the new
house amounted to about $3000 less than the purchace price of the new
house - and we had $3000 cash available in cashable investments. It
took us a few years to pay off the existing mortgage, by which time
the value of the house had already climbed by over 50%. 38 years later
it is worth almost 10 times what we paid for it.
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Default Why are stairlifts so slow?

On Sun, 14 Jun 2020 16:14:35 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 14/6/20 1:29 pm, Rod Speed wrote:


"Xeno" wrote in message
...
On 14/6/20 3:36 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 13 Jun 2020 18:31:40 +0100, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:19:43 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 12/6/20 1:33 pm, Rod Speed wrote:


"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 6/11/2020 9:42 PM, Xeno wrote:
On 12/6/20 7:11 am, Rod Speed wrote:


"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 03:58:37 +0100, Xeno

wrote:

On 9/6/20 2:55 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Fri, 22 May 2020 22:26:09 +0100, Sam E
wrote:

On 5/21/20 12:45 PM, Rod Speed wrote:

[snip]

Or maybe they realise that anyone with an incontence
problem would have something to **** in which isnt upstairs.

I consider it a bad idea to have a multi-level house without
even a half
bathroom on each level.

But if you bought the house when you were 20....

I am living in my 4th purchased item of real estate. A house
purchased
in my 20s would not suit my current needs. I sell and buy as
my needs
change through life.

I guess you're one of those who somehow managed to pay off the
mortgage of the 1st three.

You don't have to have paid off the mortgage to be able to change
houses, stupid.

True. We just put all our efforts into paying our mortgage(s)
off asap.


Wow, I have to thank Mr. Rod for the laugh calling you stupid for
paying off your mortgage.

I didn't, I called the PHucker stupid for being so pig ignorant,
stupid.

You, Rod, are the pig ignorant one. *You* introduced the topic of
selling houses before paying off mortgages hence it is your *skew
factor*, not mine. I am aware of that ability but it was *not
relevant*
to my response or the poster to whom I was replying. I was merely
responding to an assumption, correct though it surely was, by another
poster. *You* came barging in acting like a dick, as you often do.

On my third house and, of course, no mortgage.* My secont house
started at 15% and re-fi a couple of times.* Can't say I've done
everything right over the years but I knew retirement would be much
better with no debt.

A LOT of prople switch houses numerous times without ever paying off a
mortgage

I don't see the point.* You pick a house you like, then upgrade if
and when you can afford it.* That would only be once you've paid off
your mortgage entirely, otherwise you're just getting deeper into debt.


Needs and circumstances change at will and rarely when you have paid
off the mortgage.


That last isnt true of downsizing, its very common
to have paid off the mortgage in that situation.


If you care to take a look, I was responding to a point regarding
*upgrading* a house. Most couples, when they start having kids, find the
house/apartment they started out with is no longer suited to the task of
a growing family. Rarely will these couples have paid off their mortgage.

- moving up, moving sideways, or moving down.

DOWN!?* Intolerable to move to a smaller space.


Retirees and empty nesters do it all the time. I went slightly
differently, smaller block of land, larger house.


And if we decided to move to a different house now, it would be to a
bungalow from the 2 story, and it would in all likleyhood end up
BIGGER than our current 2300 sq ft plus 1100 sq ft basement - AND
would require a mortgage because bungalows cost more than 2 stories in
our market.
Not many smaller less expensive bungalows available

It was an advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought -
it had a transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was
20-22%.

Wow!* When was it that high?* I thought mortgages had always been 3-6%.

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the
equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!



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Default Why are stairlifts so slow?

On 15/6/20 8:45 am, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 14 Jun 2020 12:06:01 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 14/6/20 3:31 am, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:19:43 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 12/6/20 1:33 pm, Rod Speed wrote:


"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 6/11/2020 9:42 PM, Xeno wrote:
On 12/6/20 7:11 am, Rod Speed wrote:


"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 03:58:37 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 9/6/20 2:55 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Fri, 22 May 2020 22:26:09 +0100, Sam E
wrote:

On 5/21/20 12:45 PM, Rod Speed wrote:

[snip]

Or maybe they realise that anyone with an incontence
problem would have something to **** in which isnt upstairs.

I consider it a bad idea to have a multi-level house without
even a half
bathroom on each level.

But if you bought the house when you were 20....

I am living in my 4th purchased item of real estate. A house
purchased
in my 20s would not suit my current needs. I sell and buy as my needs
change through life.

I guess you're one of those who somehow managed to pay off the
mortgage of the 1st three.

You don't have to have paid off the mortgage to be able to change
houses, stupid.

True. We just put all our efforts into paying our mortgage(s) off asap.


Wow, I have to thank Mr. Rod for the laugh calling you stupid for
paying off your mortgage.

I didn't, I called the PHucker stupid for being so pig ignorant, stupid.

You, Rod, are the pig ignorant one. *You* introduced the topic of
selling houses before paying off mortgages hence it is your *skew
factor*, not mine. I am aware of that ability but it was *not relevant*
to my response or the poster to whom I was replying. I was merely
responding to an assumption, correct though it surely was, by another
poster. *You* came barging in acting like a dick, as you often do.

On my third house and, of course, no mortgage.* My secont house
started at 15% and re-fi a couple of times.* Can't say I've done
everything right over the years but I knew retirement would be much
better with no debt.

A LOT of prople switch houses numerous times without ever paying off a
mortgage - moving up, moving sideways, or moving down. It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%. We
still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

Don't think any mortgages here are transferable. Not that I ever needed
to do that.


Here some are, some are not. If you feel you MAY want to sell before
the mortgage maturity, having a transferrable or an open mortgage can
be an advantage

Definitely, especially if you locked in a very low interest rate
*before* the interest rates went through the roof. They used to exist -
well, permanently locked in interest rates though I don't think they
were transferable here. Now you can only get a short term of interest
rate lock-in but, with interest rates at rock bottom and no sign of a
rise any time soon, it's no longer a concern.

--

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
(with apologies to Ralph Waldo Emerson)
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On 15/6/20 8:52 am, Clare Snyder wrote:

snipped

It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%.

Wow!* When was it that high?* I thought mortgages had always been 3-6%.

Early 80s they peaked at about 24%


Only about 18% here for home mortgages. Business mortgages were higher.

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!


No, we sold a $50,000 house to buy a $67000 house. What equity we had


We paid $67,000 for our first house with a loan of $56,000, sold it for
$300,000 about 18 years later. Paid $365,000 for for the next and
borrowed a mere $75,000 to get into that one. Sold it for $600,000 nine
years later. Because we did a sea/tree change, this house cost less than
we sold our previous for.

in the old house plus the existing transferable mortgate on the new
house amounted to about $3000 less than the purchace price of the new
house - and we had $3000 cash available in cashable investments. It
took us a few years to pay off the existing mortgage, by which time
the value of the house had already climbed by over 50%. 38 years later
it is worth almost 10 times what we paid for it.



--

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
(with apologies to Ralph Waldo Emerson)
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Default Why are stairlifts so slow?

On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 09:04:48 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 15/6/20 8:45 am, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 14 Jun 2020 12:06:01 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 14/6/20 3:31 am, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:19:43 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 12/6/20 1:33 pm, Rod Speed wrote:


"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 6/11/2020 9:42 PM, Xeno wrote:
On 12/6/20 7:11 am, Rod Speed wrote:


"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 03:58:37 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 9/6/20 2:55 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Fri, 22 May 2020 22:26:09 +0100, Sam E
wrote:

On 5/21/20 12:45 PM, Rod Speed wrote:

[snip]

Or maybe they realise that anyone with an incontence
problem would have something to **** in which isnt upstairs.

I consider it a bad idea to have a multi-level house without
even a half
bathroom on each level.

But if you bought the house when you were 20....

I am living in my 4th purchased item of real estate. A house
purchased
in my 20s would not suit my current needs. I sell and buy as my needs
change through life.

I guess you're one of those who somehow managed to pay off the
mortgage of the 1st three.

You don't have to have paid off the mortgage to be able to change
houses, stupid.

True. We just put all our efforts into paying our mortgage(s) off asap.


Wow, I have to thank Mr. Rod for the laugh calling you stupid for
paying off your mortgage.

I didn't, I called the PHucker stupid for being so pig ignorant, stupid.

You, Rod, are the pig ignorant one. *You* introduced the topic of
selling houses before paying off mortgages hence it is your *skew
factor*, not mine. I am aware of that ability but it was *not relevant*
to my response or the poster to whom I was replying. I was merely
responding to an assumption, correct though it surely was, by another
poster. *You* came barging in acting like a dick, as you often do.

On my third house and, of course, no mortgage.* My secont house
started at 15% and re-fi a couple of times.* Can't say I've done
everything right over the years but I knew retirement would be much
better with no debt.

A LOT of prople switch houses numerous times without ever paying off a
mortgage - moving up, moving sideways, or moving down. It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%. We
still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

Don't think any mortgages here are transferable. Not that I ever needed
to do that.


Here some are, some are not. If you feel you MAY want to sell before
the mortgage maturity, having a transferrable or an open mortgage can
be an advantage

Definitely, especially if you locked in a very low interest rate
*before* the interest rates went through the roof. They used to exist -
well, permanently locked in interest rates though I don't think they
were transferable here. Now you can only get a short term of interest
rate lock-in but, with interest rates at rock bottom and no sign of a
rise any time soon, it's no longer a concern.


Granddad bought a 100 acre farm from an estate in 1928 for $2000 with
an open 1.25% mortgage. He dutifully paid his $25 interest every year
untill 1965 when he sold the farm and paid off the mortgage. 3
generations of the estate were involved before it could be settled.
Nobody could acuse old granddad of wasting money!!!!


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On 15/6/20 2:46 pm, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 09:04:48 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 15/6/20 8:45 am, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 14 Jun 2020 12:06:01 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 14/6/20 3:31 am, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:19:43 +1000, Xeno
wrote:

On 12/6/20 1:33 pm, Rod Speed wrote:


"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 6/11/2020 9:42 PM, Xeno wrote:
On 12/6/20 7:11 am, Rod Speed wrote:


"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 03:58:37 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 9/6/20 2:55 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Fri, 22 May 2020 22:26:09 +0100, Sam E
wrote:

On 5/21/20 12:45 PM, Rod Speed wrote:

[snip]

Or maybe they realise that anyone with an incontence
problem would have something to **** in which isnt upstairs.

I consider it a bad idea to have a multi-level house without
even a half
bathroom on each level.

But if you bought the house when you were 20....

I am living in my 4th purchased item of real estate. A house
purchased
in my 20s would not suit my current needs. I sell and buy as my needs
change through life.

I guess you're one of those who somehow managed to pay off the
mortgage of the 1st three.

You don't have to have paid off the mortgage to be able to change
houses, stupid.

True. We just put all our efforts into paying our mortgage(s) off asap.


Wow, I have to thank Mr. Rod for the laugh calling you stupid for
paying off your mortgage.

I didn't, I called the PHucker stupid for being so pig ignorant, stupid.

You, Rod, are the pig ignorant one. *You* introduced the topic of
selling houses before paying off mortgages hence it is your *skew
factor*, not mine. I am aware of that ability but it was *not relevant*
to my response or the poster to whom I was replying. I was merely
responding to an assumption, correct though it surely was, by another
poster. *You* came barging in acting like a dick, as you often do.

On my third house and, of course, no mortgage.* My secont house
started at 15% and re-fi a couple of times.* Can't say I've done
everything right over the years but I knew retirement would be much
better with no debt.

A LOT of prople switch houses numerous times without ever paying off a
mortgage - moving up, moving sideways, or moving down. It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%. We
still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

Don't think any mortgages here are transferable. Not that I ever needed
to do that.

Here some are, some are not. If you feel you MAY want to sell before
the mortgage maturity, having a transferrable or an open mortgage can
be an advantage

Definitely, especially if you locked in a very low interest rate
*before* the interest rates went through the roof. They used to exist -
well, permanently locked in interest rates though I don't think they
were transferable here. Now you can only get a short term of interest
rate lock-in but, with interest rates at rock bottom and no sign of a
rise any time soon, it's no longer a concern.


Granddad bought a 100 acre farm from an estate in 1928 for $2000 with
an open 1.25% mortgage. He dutifully paid his $25 interest every year
untill 1965 when he sold the farm and paid off the mortgage. 3
generations of the estate were involved before it could be settled.
Nobody could acuse old granddad of wasting money!!!!

The old timers who went through the depression certainly didn't waste
money. A friend, from a similar era, would accumulate his pay cheques in
his desk drawer and the payroll staff, every few months or so, would
have to remind him to cash them so they could balance the books. He was
single of course. Had he a wife, there would have been a rush every pay
day. ;-)

--

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
(with apologies to Ralph Waldo Emerson)
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On Fri, 22 May 2020 06:30:04 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 22/5/20 7:29 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Thu, 21 May 2020 12:47:55 +0100, Grumpy Old White Guy
wrote:

On 5/20/2020 8:32 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why are stairlifts so slow? A whole minute to get upstairs is not
acceptable for an old person desperate for the toilet.

Because most people have become pussified snowflakes, unwilling to
accept modest risk.


Agreed. Although in the case of the stairlift, at any speed you are
safe due to the supplied belt. If you don't use it, your fault not
theirs, so no compensation claim, nothing for them to worry about. And
they could even make it disable the motor if you don't fasten the belt.

But people have become incredibly illogical too. Ever notice all the
obese people wearing masks? Apparently it never occurred to them that
being obese was more of a threat than the Wuhan virus?


Agreed. Although I've seen nobody in the UK wearing a mask, we don't
bother.


Which is why you have high levels of contamination.


Which is the choice of each person.

And you clearly haven't been watching the stats, the UK rate dropped to a quarter when the world rate dropped to two thirds.

Maybe we're using what's called an immune system?

If they are so afraid of dying, why don't they change their diet and
lose some weight? The evidence is clear, metabolically healthy people
are largely unaffected by the Wuhan virus.


Agreed. When a fat person says they have a medical problem, I just say
"Eat. Less. Food." You don't need to change your diet, just eat less
of it. Or go for a run or something, it's not rocket science.


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On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 02:45:50 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 12/6/20 8:29 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 04:06:44 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 9/6/20 3:50 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Sat, 23 May 2020 02:43:11 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 23/5/20 11:23 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Fri, 22 May 2020 04:12:48 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 22/5/20 1:00 pm, williamwright wrote:
On 22/05/2020 01:47, Commander Kinsey wrote:

On that subject, I was once told it's impossible to pee with an
erection. Discuss.

So you've never had an erection?

Bill

Impossible for him to get an erection, he doesn't have a dick.

Then the appropriate word would be "she". Please learn basic English.

Mea culpa, the word I should have used is *it* since you've obviously
been castrated.

If you get your dick removed, you're now female. I don't believe in
this mid-gender new age ****.

You become neutral or, in other words, it. You are definitely not female
if castrated. I see you do not understand the basics of anatomy.

Besides, castration does not entail removal of the penis.


If you aren't fully equipped to be a man, you're a woman, even if just
as an insult.


Nope, you still remain a man, just dickless.


No, that's a rude term for somebody with a 6 inch cock.
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On Sat, 13 Jun 2020 13:46:11 +0100, Gary wrote:

Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Exactly. Anyone consistently going into greater debt has no clue how to
live within their means. I know a couple of people with rather modest
incomes but not only get by, but have a cushion in the bank.


That's me. I learned long ago to live within my means. No debt
here. I get teased for being cheap occasionally. It's not
being cheap, it's survival and knowing what you can afford.
No worries here and no envy of people that have more toys
than I do.


I seem to do both. I always find the cheapest thing to buy, or consider doing the job myself, but I still like something expensive now and then, like a holiday. The banks will not be getting my money back :-)
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On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 00:17:50 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 15/6/20 8:52 am, Clare Snyder wrote:

snipped

It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%.

Wow! When was it that high? I thought mortgages had always been 3-6%.

Early 80s they peaked at about 24%


Only about 18% here for home mortgages. Business mortgages were higher.


How on earth could that work? At under 5% people can only just afford to get one.

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!


No, we sold a $50,000 house to buy a $67000 house. What equity we had


We paid $67,000 for our first house with a loan of $56,000, sold it for
$300,000 about 18 years later. Paid $365,000 for for the next and
borrowed a mere $75,000 to get into that one. Sold it for $600,000 nine
years later. Because we did a sea/tree change, this house cost less than
we sold our previous for.


Double the price in 9 years is some profit. Mine has almost doubled in 20 years. Sid you deliberately buy something you thought would be worth more later? And I've no idea what sea/tree means.

in the old house plus the existing transferable mortgate on the new
house amounted to about $3000 less than the purchace price of the new
house - and we had $3000 cash available in cashable investments. It
took us a few years to pay off the existing mortgage, by which time
the value of the house had already climbed by over 50%. 38 years later
it is worth almost 10 times what we paid for it.




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"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Fri, 22 May 2020 06:30:04 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 22/5/20 7:29 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Thu, 21 May 2020 12:47:55 +0100, Grumpy Old White Guy
wrote:

On 5/20/2020 8:32 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
Why are stairlifts so slow? A whole minute to get upstairs is not
acceptable for an old person desperate for the toilet.

Because most people have become pussified snowflakes, unwilling to
accept modest risk.

Agreed. Although in the case of the stairlift, at any speed you are
safe due to the supplied belt. If you don't use it, your fault not
theirs, so no compensation claim, nothing for them to worry about. And
they could even make it disable the motor if you don't fasten the belt.

But people have become incredibly illogical too. Ever notice all the
obese people wearing masks? Apparently it never occurred to them that
being obese was more of a threat than the Wuhan virus?

Agreed. Although I've seen nobody in the UK wearing a mask, we don't
bother.


Which is why you have high levels of contamination.


Which is the choice of each person.


To infect lots of others by their stupidity like you do.

And you clearly haven't been watching the stats,


You are too stupid to even work out what they mean.

the UK rate dropped to a quarter


Pity about all those corpses.

when the world rate dropped to two thirds.


Because it takes time to get to the places that don't
see as much international movement of people, stupid.

Maybe we're using what's called an immune system?


Nope, that's the result of the lockdown, stupid.

If they are so afraid of dying, why don't they change their diet and
lose some weight? The evidence is clear, metabolically healthy people
are largely unaffected by the Wuhan virus.

Agreed. When a fat person says they have a medical problem, I just say
"Eat. Less. Food." You don't need to change your diet, just eat less
of it. Or go for a run or something, it's not rocket science.


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On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 06:07:24 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH the trolling senile asshole's latest troll**** unread

--
Another typical retarded conversation between our two village idiots,
Birdbrain and Rodent Speed:

Birdbrain: "You beat me to it. Plain sex is boring."

Senile Rodent: "Then **** the cats. That wont be boring."

Birdbrain: "Sell me a de-clawing tool first."

Senile Rodent: "Wont help with the teeth."

Birdbrain: "They've never gone for me with their mouths."

Rodent Speed: "They will if you are stupid enough to try ****ing them."

Birdbrain: "No, they always use claws."

Rodent Speed: "They wont if you try ****ing them. Try it and see."

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Default Why are stairlifts so slow?



"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 00:17:50 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 15/6/20 8:52 am, Clare Snyder wrote:

snipped

It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%.

Wow! When was it that high? I thought mortgages had always been
3-6%.
Early 80s they peaked at about 24%


Only about 18% here for home mortgages. Business mortgages were higher.


How on earth could that work?


The rate hiked after they got the mortgage.

At under 5% people can only just afford to get one.


That depends on the property value, stupid.

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the
equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!

No, we sold a $50,000 house to buy a $67000 house. What equity we had


We paid $67,000 for our first house with a loan of $56,000, sold it for
$300,000 about 18 years later. Paid $365,000 for for the next and
borrowed a mere $75,000 to get into that one. Sold it for $600,000 nine
years later. Because we did a sea/tree change, this house cost less than
we sold our previous for.


Double the price in 9 years is some profit.


Some of ours did that.

Mine has almost doubled in 20 years.


Because no one is actually stupid enough to want
a house in a council sink estate like yours.

Sid you deliberately buy something you thought would be worth more later?


Virtually always true here.

And I've no idea what sea/tree means.


Leave one of the state capitals to live by the
sea or away from the sea where the trees are.

in the old house plus the existing transferable mortgate on the new
house amounted to about $3000 less than the purchace price of the new
house - and we had $3000 cash available in cashable investments. It
took us a few years to pay off the existing mortgage, by which time
the value of the house had already climbed by over 50%. 38 years later
it is worth almost 10 times what we paid for it.


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On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 06:14:26 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH the two subnormal sociopathic cretins' endless absolutely idiotic
blather

--
Another typical retarded "conversation" between the two resident idiots:

Birdbrain: "But imagine how cool it was to own slaves."

Senile Rodent: "Yeah, right. Feed them, clothe them, and fix them when
they're broken.
After all, you paid good money for them. Then you've got to keep an eye
on them all the time."

Birdbrain: "Better than having to give them wages on top of that."

Senile Rodent: "Specially when they make more slaves for you
and produce their own food and clothes."

MID:
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On 19/6/20 4:57 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 00:17:50 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 15/6/20 8:52 am, Clare Snyder wrote:

snipped

It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%.

Wow!* When was it that high?* I thought mortgages had always been
3-6%.
* Early 80s they peaked at about 24%


Only about 18% here for home mortgages. Business mortgages were higher.


How on earth could that work?* At under 5% people can only just afford
to get one.


That may be the case in the UK. I started with a mortgage of 13%. Not
long after I took it on, the interest rate went to, in my case, 17.5%.
Heady times indeed.

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the
equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!

No, we sold a $50,000 house to buy a $67000 house. What equity we had


We paid $67,000 for our first house with a loan of $56,000, sold it for
$300,000 about 18 years later. Paid $365,000 for for the next and
borrowed a mere $75,000 to get into that one. Sold it for $600,000 nine
years later. Because we did a sea/tree change, this house cost less than
we sold our previous for.


Double the price in 9 years is some profit.* Mine has almost doubled in
20 years.* Sid you deliberately buy something you thought would be worth
more later?* And I've no idea what sea/tree means.


Nope. I bought in order to *get into the market*. With house prices
rising that much over a relatively short period of time, people found
themselves in a position where even being able to save up the *deposit*
was difficult. Set a target and it's moved out of reach by the time you
achieve it. As an example. The house I sold 7 years ago for $600k,
located a mere 16 kilometres from the heart of Melbourne, doubled in
price over the next *5* years. That's insane price rises in anyone's book.
Around here, people have a sea change if they move/retire from the city
to a seaside town. People have a tree change if they move/retire to a
rural town. I did both in the same move. I now live in a small rural
seaside city where where we are surrounded by farms but the nearest
beach is 5 kilometres distant. In other words, it's a rural centre and a
beachside holiday resort.

in the old house plus the existing transferable mortgate on the new
house amounted to about $3000 less than the purchace price of the new
house - and we had $3000 cash available in cashable investments. It
took us a few years to pay off the existing mortgage, by which time
the value of the house had already climbed by over 50%. 38 years later
it is worth almost 10 times what we paid for it.




--

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
(with apologies to Ralph Waldo Emerson)


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On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 23:39:02 +1000, Beno, another brainless, troll-feeding,
senile Australian idiot, blathered:



That may be the case in the UK.


Are you back again, you troll-feeding senile asshole from Oz? Is the
unwashed Scottish ******'s cock THAT irresistible to you?
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Default Why are stairlifts so slow?

On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 14:39:02 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 19/6/20 4:57 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 00:17:50 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 15/6/20 8:52 am, Clare Snyder wrote:

snipped

It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%.

Wow! When was it that high? I thought mortgages had always been
3-6%.
Early 80s they peaked at about 24%

Only about 18% here for home mortgages. Business mortgages were higher.


How on earth could that work? At under 5% people can only just afford
to get one.


That may be the case in the UK. I started with a mortgage of 13%. Not
long after I took it on, the interest rate went to, in my case, 17.5%.
Heady times indeed.


According to https://www.worldometers.info/gdp/gdp-per-capita/ Aussies aren't much richer than Poms. But then you have more land per person, so I guess houses are cheaper.

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the
equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of paint
to do any redecorating.

So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!

No, we sold a $50,000 house to buy a $67000 house. What equity we had

We paid $67,000 for our first house with a loan of $56,000, sold it for
$300,000 about 18 years later. Paid $365,000 for for the next and
borrowed a mere $75,000 to get into that one. Sold it for $600,000 nine
years later. Because we did a sea/tree change, this house cost less than
we sold our previous for.


Double the price in 9 years is some profit. Mine has almost doubled in
20 years. Sid you deliberately buy something you thought would be worth
more later? And I've no idea what sea/tree means.


Nope. I bought in order to *get into the market*. With house prices
rising that much over a relatively short period of time, people found
themselves in a position where even being able to save up the *deposit*
was difficult. Set a target and it's moved out of reach by the time you
achieve it. As an example. The house I sold 7 years ago for $600k,
located a mere 16 kilometres from the heart of Melbourne, doubled in
price over the next *5* years. That's insane price rises in anyone's book.
Around here, people have a sea change if they move/retire from the city
to a seaside town. People have a tree change if they move/retire to a
rural town. I did both in the same move. I now live in a small rural
seaside city where where we are surrounded by farms but the nearest
beach is 5 kilometres distant. In other words, it's a rural centre and a
beachside holiday resort.


It amazes me that the houses in nicer places cost less. I wouldn't live in a city even if I could afford it.
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"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 14:39:02 +0100, Xeno wrote:

On 19/6/20 4:57 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 00:17:50 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 15/6/20 8:52 am, Clare Snyder wrote:

snipped

It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%.

Wow! When was it that high? I thought mortgages had always been
3-6%.
Early 80s they peaked at about 24%

Only about 18% here for home mortgages. Business mortgages were higher.

How on earth could that work? At under 5% people can only just afford
to get one.


That may be the case in the UK. I started with a mortgage of 13%. Not
long after I took it on, the interest rate went to, in my case, 17.5%.
Heady times indeed.


According to https://www.worldometers.info/gdp/gdp-per-capita/ Aussies
aren't much richer than Poms.


That's not a measure of richer, stupid.

But then you have more land per person,


What matters is the size of the house block of land, stupid.

so I guess houses are cheaper.


Its much more complicated than that, stupid.

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the
equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of
paint
to do any redecorating.

So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!

No, we sold a $50,000 house to buy a $67000 house. What equity we had

We paid $67,000 for our first house with a loan of $56,000, sold it for
$300,000 about 18 years later. Paid $365,000 for for the next and
borrowed a mere $75,000 to get into that one. Sold it for $600,000 nine
years later. Because we did a sea/tree change, this house cost less
than
we sold our previous for.

Double the price in 9 years is some profit. Mine has almost doubled in
20 years. Sid you deliberately buy something you thought would be worth
more later? And I've no idea what sea/tree means.


Nope. I bought in order to *get into the market*. With house prices
rising that much over a relatively short period of time, people found
themselves in a position where even being able to save up the *deposit*
was difficult. Set a target and it's moved out of reach by the time you
achieve it. As an example. The house I sold 7 years ago for $600k,
located a mere 16 kilometres from the heart of Melbourne, doubled in
price over the next *5* years. That's insane price rises in anyone's
book.
Around here, people have a sea change if they move/retire from the city
to a seaside town. People have a tree change if they move/retire to a
rural town. I did both in the same move. I now live in a small rural
seaside city where where we are surrounded by farms but the nearest
beach is 5 kilometres distant. In other words, it's a rural centre and a
beachside holiday resort.


It amazes me that the houses in nicer places cost less.


Yes, you actually are that stupid.

I wouldn't live in a city even if I could afford it.


Most do that for the jobs, stupid.

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On Sat, 20 Jun 2020 07:01:54 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH the two subnormal sociopathic cretins' endless absolutely idiotic
blather

--
TYPICAL retarded "conversation" between sociopath Rodent and sociopath
Birdbrain from August 26th 2018:

Birdbrain: "I have one head but 5 fingers."

Senile Rodent: "Obvious lie. You hairy legged cross dressers are so inbred
that you all have two heads."

Birdbrain: "You're the one that likes hairy legs remember?"

Senile Rodent: "The problem isnt the hairy legs, it's the gross inbreeding
that
produces two headed unemployables like you."

Birdbrain: "So why did you mention hairy legs?"

Senile Rodent: "Because that's what those who arent actually stupid enough
to shave their legs have."

Birdbrain: "You only have hairy legs if both of the following are true:
1) You're quite far back on the evolutionary scale.
2) You haven't learned what a razor is for."

Senile Rodent: "Only a terminal ****wit or a woman shaves their legs."

Birdbrain: "There is literally zero point in having hair all over your
body."

Senile Rodent: "There is even less point in wasting your time changing what
you are born with."

MID:
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On 20/6/20 7:01 am, Rod Speed wrote:


"Commander Kinsey" wrote in message
news[email protected]...
On Fri, 19 Jun 2020 14:39:02 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 19/6/20 4:57 am, Commander Kinsey wrote:
On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 00:17:50 +0100, Xeno
wrote:

On 15/6/20 8:52 am, Clare Snyder wrote:

snipped

It was an
advantage for the folks selling our house when we bought - it
had a
transferable mortgage at 6 1/4% when the going rate was 20-22%.

Wow!* When was it that high?* I thought mortgages had always been
3-6%.
* Early 80s they peaked at about 24%

Only about 18% here for home mortgages. Business mortgages were
higher.

How on earth could that work?* At under 5% people can only just afford
to get one.

That may be the case in the UK. I started with a mortgage of 13%. Not
long after I took it on, the interest rate went to, in my case, 17.5%.
Heady times indeed.


According to https://www.worldometers.info/gdp/gdp-per-capita/ Aussies
aren't much richer than Poms.


That's not a measure of richer, stupid.

But then you have more land per person,


What matters is the size of the house block of land, stupid.

so I guess houses are cheaper.


Its much more complicated than that, stupid.

We still had a mortgage on the house we moved out of too, but the
equity
in house#1 allowed us to pretty much pay cash to the existing
mortgage. We payed off that mortgage before buying a gallon of
paint
to do any redecorating.

So you bought a house worth less than your old one?!

No, we sold a $50,000 house to buy a $67000 house. What equity we had

We paid $67,000 for our first house with a loan of $56,000, sold it
for
$300,000 about 18 years later. Paid $365,000 for for the next and
borrowed a mere $75,000 to get into that one. Sold it for $600,000
nine
years later. Because we did a sea/tree change, this house cost less
than
we sold our previous for.

Double the price in 9 years is some profit.* Mine has almost doubled in
20 years.* Sid you deliberately buy something you thought would be
worth
more later?* And I've no idea what sea/tree means.

Nope. I bought in order to *get into the market*. With house prices
rising that much over a relatively short period of time, people found
themselves in a position where even being able to save up the *deposit*
was difficult. Set a target and it's moved out of reach by the time you
achieve it. As an example. The house I sold 7 years ago for $600k,
located a mere 16 kilometres from the heart of Melbourne, doubled in
price over the next *5* years. That's insane price rises in anyone's
book.
Around here, people have a sea change if they move/retire from the city
to a seaside town. People have a tree change if they move/retire to a
rural town. I did both in the same move. I now live in a small rural
seaside city where where we are surrounded by farms but the nearest
beach is 5 kilometres distant. In other words, it's a rural centre and a
beachside holiday resort.


It amazes me that the houses in nicer places cost less.


Yes, you actually are that stupid.

I wouldn't live in a city even if I could afford it.


Most do that for the jobs, stupid.


Indeed. That was my motivation, a career move to Melbourne in 1980.

--

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
(with apologies to Ralph Waldo Emerson)
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