Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11   Report Post  
Old August 28th 19, 05:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2018
Posts: 170
Default An idea I had concerning Student Loans

Ralph Mowery wrote:
In article ,
says...

Private trade schools and charter schools are often just big scams -
the "official" community colleges and polytechnics have generally good
teachers and turn out qualified graduates.




It depends on the school. A local 'offical ' community college was much
different. A co worker taught for several years at one at night. He is
very good at teaching.

One year he was teaching a 2nd course in electrical. The students ere
grown men that their companies sent them there for classes. He found
out that they had just been passed through the first part and did not
know much. He had to fail about half of them. He was called in by the
head of the college and said that his services were no longer needed.

Seems that the college was just after the money from the local
businesses and all the students 'had to pass with a C or better'.


Private colleges in particular work hard to make certain that
students are "successful". Big state schools are a little more
"callous". Community colleges generally attract a much less
"traditional" group of students, many of them out of high school
for many years. A department chair is likely to say that if the
students aren't being successful it's the teacher's fault. Surely
the failing students will say it's the teacher's fault. No
college likes to lose students. Graduate schools expect to lose
some. There's no place for ineptitude on the part of the students
or the teachers. The "bottom line analysis" is very often done in
terms of numbers, since that's the easiest way.

Brick and mortar schools are quite concerned about the upcoming
ones on the Internet. They are quite concerned with "staying
relevant". Loneliest place on most campuses these days--the
library. Little joke: What's a "library"?


  #12   Report Post  
Old August 28th 19, 06:26 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2015
Posts: 2,472
Default An idea I had concerning Student Loans

On 8/28/2019 12:44 PM, Bill wrote:
Ralph Mowery wrote:
In article ,
says...

Private trade schools and charter schools are often just big scams -
the "official" community colleges and polytechnics have generally good
teachers and turn out qualified graduates.




It depends on the school.¬* A local 'offical ' community college was much
different.¬* A co worker taught for several years at one at night.¬* He is
very good at teaching.

One year he was teaching a 2nd course in electrical.¬* The students ere
grown men that their companies sent them there for classes.¬* He found
out that they had just been passed through the first part and did not
know much.¬* He had to fail about half of them.¬* He was called in by the
head of the college and said that his services were no longer needed.

Seems that the college was just after the money from the local
businesses and all the students 'had to pass with a C or better'.


Private colleges in particular work hard to make certain that students
are "successful".¬* Big state schools are a little more "callous".
Community colleges generally attract a much less "traditional" group of
students, many of them out of high school for many years. A department
chair is likely to say that if the students aren't being successful it's
the teacher's fault. Surely the failing students will say it's the
teacher's fault. No college likes to lose students. Graduate schools
expect to lose some. There's no place for ineptitude on the part of the
students or the teachers. The "bottom line analysis" is very often done
in terms of numbers, since that's the easiest way.

Brick and mortar schools are quite concerned about the upcoming ones on
the Internet.¬* They are quite concerned with "staying relevant".
Loneliest place on most campuses these days--the library.¬* Little joke:
What's a "library"?


Same thing happened to a classmate of mine at a community college
teaching civil engineering. I was talking to a a student at U of Del
the other day and she said they are still tough.
  #13   Report Post  
Old August 28th 19, 08:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2018
Posts: 170
Default An idea I had concerning Student Loans

Frank wrote:
On 8/28/2019 12:44 PM, Bill wrote:
Ralph Mowery wrote:
In article ,
says...

Private trade schools and charter schools are often just big
scams -
the "official" community colleges and polytechnics have
generally good
teachers and turn out qualified graduates.




It depends on the school.¬* A local 'offical ' community
college was much
different.¬* A co worker taught for several years at one at
night.¬* He is
very good at teaching.

One year he was teaching a 2nd course in electrical.¬* The
students ere
grown men that their companies sent them there for classes.
He found
out that they had just been passed through the first part and
did not
know much.¬* He had to fail about half of them.¬* He was called
in by the
head of the college and said that his services were no longer
needed.

Seems that the college was just after the money from the local
businesses and all the students 'had to pass with a C or better'.


Private colleges in particular work hard to make certain that
students are "successful".¬* Big state schools are a little more
"callous". Community colleges generally attract a much less
"traditional" group of students, many of them out of high
school for many years. A department chair is likely to say that
if the students aren't being successful it's the teacher's
fault. Surely the failing students will say it's the teacher's
fault. No college likes to lose students. Graduate schools
expect to lose some. There's no place for ineptitude on the
part of the students or the teachers. The "bottom line
analysis" is very often done in terms of numbers, since that's
the easiest way.

Brick and mortar schools are quite concerned about the upcoming
ones on the Internet.¬* They are quite concerned with "staying
relevant". Loneliest place on most campuses these days--the
library.¬* Little joke: What's a "library"?


Same thing happened to a classmate of mine at a community college
teaching civil engineering.¬* I was talking to a a student at U of
Del the other day and she said they are still tough.


I think engineering courses can afford to be tougher since the
students are tougher, and they tend to be better prepared--and
they didn't choose engineering as a major because they were
looking for the path of least resistance.
  #14   Report Post  
Old August 29th 19, 12:46 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2015
Posts: 2,472
Default An idea I had concerning Student Loans

On 8/28/2019 3:07 PM, Bill wrote:
Frank wrote:
On 8/28/2019 12:44 PM, Bill wrote:
Ralph Mowery wrote:
In article ,
says...

Private trade schools and charter schools are often just big scams -
the "official" community colleges and polytechnics have generally good
teachers and turn out qualified graduates.




It depends on the school.¬* A local 'offical ' community college was
much
different.¬* A co worker taught for several years at one at night.
He is
very good at teaching.

One year he was teaching a 2nd course in electrical.¬* The students ere
grown men that their companies sent them there for classes. He found
out that they had just been passed through the first part and did not
know much.¬* He had to fail about half of them.¬* He was called in by the
head of the college and said that his services were no longer needed.

Seems that the college was just after the money from the local
businesses and all the students 'had to pass with a C or better'.

Private colleges in particular work hard to make certain that
students are "successful".¬* Big state schools are a little more
"callous". Community colleges generally attract a much less
"traditional" group of students, many of them out of high school for
many years. A department chair is likely to say that if the students
aren't being successful it's the teacher's fault. Surely the failing
students will say it's the teacher's fault. No college likes to lose
students. Graduate schools expect to lose some. There's no place for
ineptitude on the part of the students or the teachers. The "bottom
line analysis" is very often done in terms of numbers, since that's
the easiest way.

Brick and mortar schools are quite concerned about the upcoming ones
on the Internet.¬* They are quite concerned with "staying relevant".
Loneliest place on most campuses these days--the library.¬* Little
joke: What's a "library"?


Same thing happened to a classmate of mine at a community college
teaching civil engineering.¬* I was talking to a a student at U of Del
the other day and she said they are still tough.


I think engineering courses can afford to be tougher since the students
are tougher, and they tend to be better prepared--and they didn't choose
engineering as a major because they were looking for the path of least
resistance.


I agree. All STEM courses are tougher. STEM students spend the college
years with their heads in the books, not partying. You also need the
talent for these studies and some cannot cut it no matter how hard they
study.
  #15   Report Post  
Old August 29th 19, 03:17 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2017
Posts: 2,450
Default An idea I had concerning Student Loans

On Wed, 28 Aug 2019 12:44:52 -0400, Bill wrote:

Ralph Mowery wrote:
In article ,
says...

Private trade schools and charter schools are often just big scams -
the "official" community colleges and polytechnics have generally good
teachers and turn out qualified graduates.




It depends on the school. A local 'offical ' community college was much
different. A co worker taught for several years at one at night. He is
very good at teaching.

One year he was teaching a 2nd course in electrical. The students ere
grown men that their companies sent them there for classes. He found
out that they had just been passed through the first part and did not
know much. He had to fail about half of them. He was called in by the
head of the college and said that his services were no longer needed.

Seems that the college was just after the money from the local
businesses and all the students 'had to pass with a C or better'.


Private colleges in particular work hard to make certain that
students are "successful". Big state schools are a little more
"callous". Community colleges generally attract a much less
"traditional" group of students, many of them out of high school
for many years. A department chair is likely to say that if the
students aren't being successful it's the teacher's fault. Surely
the failing students will say it's the teacher's fault. No
college likes to lose students. Graduate schools expect to lose
some. There's no place for ineptitude on the part of the students
or the teachers. The "bottom line analysis" is very often done in
terms of numbers, since that's the easiest way.

Brick and mortar schools are quite concerned about the upcoming
ones on the Internet. They are quite concerned with "staying
relevant". Loneliest place on most campuses these days--the
library. Little joke: What's a "library"?

Check into the Ontario "colleges of applied arts and technology" -
AKA "Community colleges"
Look at "Conestoga College of Applied Arts and Technology" in
Kitchener Ontario. It is a degree granting college as well as a
certificate or diploma granting college - and MANY of their students
are "university graduates" furthering their education - particularly
in technology - like graduate engineers going to college to learn
something that will make them usefull in today's job market.

Students often from one of the top engineering and high tech
universities in North America - the University of Waterloo.

Yes - we have a pretty good college and university program/system up
here. They also teach the courses for the Insurance Bureau for
insurance workers to earn their qualifications. And the nurses
training program - and paramedicals and first responders.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
An idea I had concerning Student Loans Ralph Mowery Home Repair 9 August 29th 19 06:05 PM
An idea I had concerning Student Loans Frank[_24_] Home Repair 4 August 28th 19 01:05 AM
An idea I had concerning Student Loans [email protected] Home Repair 1 August 27th 19 07:08 PM
An idea I had concerning Student Loans Bill[_91_] Home Repair 0 August 27th 19 06:48 PM
An idea I had concerning Student Loans [email protected] Home Repair 0 August 27th 19 06:15 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:38 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017