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  #31   Report Post  
Old June 11th 19, 06:43 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 9,446
Default Sub Panel neutral bonding

On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 11:48:12 -0500, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 6/11/2019 8:32 AM, wrote:


Why is the ground rod at the service any better than the one at the
shop? I agree 4 is better than 2 but they are already bonded together
via the neutral in a 3 wire feeder. I doubt he wants to dig up the
yard. This was done this way for 90 years and we didn't pile up a lot
of bodies. The code change was mostly just to make the language
consistent with the rest of the code. Same with ranges and dryers. The
grandfather clause is still there for things done pre 96 adoption.
It does mean you have to be more careful with your bonding and
grounding tho.

the ground connection serves 2 purposes

1) a path for lightning
the ground rod is to provide a path for lightning etc.
this NEEDS to be a path to actual Earth ground because that is where lightning will go.

2) protection from shock due to equipment faults
this is to protect you from a shock if the hot wire shorts to the metal case inside an appliance. Think of a motor with all those windings of enameled wire. If the insulation should fail and connect the power to the metal case of the appliance, you can be shocked by touching the appliance. If the case is grounded however, when

the short happens, a large fault current will flow and blow the breaker. For a LARGE fault current to flow, the ground must be low resistance. So you want a BOND WIRE between the neutral and ground in the system. This provides a path for the fault current to flow sufficient to blow the breaker if there is a ground fault.
Often a ground rod alone is too high resistance.

#2 is an important safety feature, I would not skimp on this.


So if have only 3 wires between the buildings and you can't add the 4th wire, I think bonding the outbuilding neutral and ground together at the entrance to the outbuilding is the safer option compared to relying on a ground rod alone.

You can also add a ground rod there to help for lightning.

If you don't need 240V and need only 120V in the outbuilding, you can use the 3 wires as hot neutral and ground. That is 100% safe and legal but you give up having 240V.



mark


* Done is done , I have bonded the ground/neutral in the sub panel and
added a ground rod out in the shop . Doing without 240V is unacceptable
, I have 2 welders and an air compressor that all need 240V . And plans
are to install a 240V 3 phase motor with a VFD on the mill in the future
. Lightning is unlikely down in The Holler , but still possible . This
is a "hobby" shop , but is very well equipped - pretty much a full
machine and welding shop .


Rock on dude ;-)

  #32   Report Post  
Old June 11th 19, 09:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,924
Default Sub Panel neutral bonding

On 6/11/2019 12:43 PM, wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 11:48:12 -0500, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 6/11/2019 8:32 AM,
wrote:

Why is the ground rod at the service any better than the one at the
shop? I agree 4 is better than 2 but they are already bonded together
via the neutral in a 3 wire feeder. I doubt he wants to dig up the
yard. This was done this way for 90 years and we didn't pile up a lot
of bodies. The code change was mostly just to make the language
consistent with the rest of the code. Same with ranges and dryers. The
grandfather clause is still there for things done pre 96 adoption.
It does mean you have to be more careful with your bonding and
grounding tho.
the ground connection serves 2 purposes

1) a path for lightning
the ground rod is to provide a path for lightning etc.
this NEEDS to be a path to actual Earth ground because that is where lightning will go.

2) protection from shock due to equipment faults
this is to protect you from a shock if the hot wire shorts to the metal case inside an appliance. Think of a motor with all those windings of enameled wire. If the insulation should fail and connect the power to the metal case of the appliance, you can be shocked by touching the appliance. If the case is grounded however, when

the short happens, a large fault current will flow and blow the breaker. For a LARGE fault current to flow, the ground must be low resistance. So you want a BOND WIRE between the neutral and ground in the system. This provides a path for the fault current to flow sufficient to blow the breaker if there is a ground fault.
Often a ground rod alone is too high resistance.
#2 is an important safety feature, I would not skimp on this.


So if have only 3 wires between the buildings and you can't add the 4th wire, I think bonding the outbuilding neutral and ground together at the entrance to the outbuilding is the safer option compared to relying on a ground rod alone.

You can also add a ground rod there to help for lightning.

If you don't need 240V and need only 120V in the outbuilding, you can use the 3 wires as hot neutral and ground. That is 100% safe and legal but you give up having 240V.



mark

* Done is done , I have bonded the ground/neutral in the sub panel and
added a ground rod out in the shop . Doing without 240V is unacceptable
, I have 2 welders and an air compressor that all need 240V . And plans
are to install a 240V 3 phase motor with a VFD on the mill in the future
. Lightning is unlikely down in The Holler , but still possible . This
is a "hobby" shop , but is very well equipped - pretty much a full
machine and welding shop .

Rock on dude ;-)

* Well ,this afternoon it's a country mix on YouTube ...

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

  #33   Report Post  
Old June 11th 19, 10:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,446
Default Sub Panel neutral bonding

On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:21:46 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 12:47:52 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 6/11/2019 8:32 AM, wrote:


Why is the ground rod at the service any better than the one at the
shop? I agree 4 is better than 2 but they are already bonded together
via the neutral in a 3 wire feeder. I doubt he wants to dig up the
yard. This was done this way for 90 years and we didn't pile up a lot
of bodies. The code change was mostly just to make the language
consistent with the rest of the code. Same with ranges and dryers. The
grandfather clause is still there for things done pre 96 adoption.
It does mean you have to be more careful with your bonding and
grounding tho.
the ground connection serves 2 purposes

1) a path for lightning
the ground rod is to provide a path for lightning etc.
this NEEDS to be a path to actual Earth ground because that is where lightning will go.

2) protection from shock due to equipment faults
this is to protect you from a shock if the hot wire shorts to the metal case inside an appliance. Think of a motor with all those windings of enameled wire. If the insulation should fail and connect the power to the metal case of the appliance, you can be shocked by touching the appliance. If the case is grounded however,

when the short happens, a large fault current will flow and blow the breaker. For a LARGE fault current to flow, the ground must be low resistance. So you want a BOND WIRE between the neutral and ground in the system. This provides a path for the fault current to flow sufficient to blow the breaker if there is a ground fault.
Often a ground rod alone is too high resistance.

#2 is an important safety feature, I would not skimp on this.


So if have only 3 wires between the buildings and you can't add the 4th wire, I think bonding the outbuilding neutral and ground together at the entrance to the outbuilding is the safer option compared to relying on a ground rod alone.

You can also add a ground rod there to help for lightning.

If you don't need 240V and need only 120V in the outbuilding, you can use the 3 wires as hot neutral and ground. That is 100% safe and legal but you give up having 240V.



mark


* Done is done , I have bonded the ground/neutral in the sub panel and
added a ground rod out in the shop . Doing without 240V is unacceptable
, I have 2 welders and an air compressor that all need 240V . And plans
are to install a 240V 3 phase motor with a VFD on the mill in the future
. Lightning is unlikely down in The Holler , but still possible . This
is a "hobby" shop , but is very well equipped - pretty much a full
machine and welding shop .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !


That's what I would have done too, except probably adding a second ground
rod. IDK how you're going to install 3 phase eqpt though, without redoing
what you just did and a whole new service, for that matter?


You can get a VFD that is single phase in and 3 phase out
  #34   Report Post  
Old June 11th 19, 10:20 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2014
Posts: 11,930
Default Sub Panel neutral bonding

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 5:05:03 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:21:46 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 12:47:52 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 6/11/2019 8:32 AM, wrote:


Why is the ground rod at the service any better than the one at the
shop? I agree 4 is better than 2 but they are already bonded together
via the neutral in a 3 wire feeder. I doubt he wants to dig up the
yard. This was done this way for 90 years and we didn't pile up a lot
of bodies. The code change was mostly just to make the language
consistent with the rest of the code. Same with ranges and dryers. The
grandfather clause is still there for things done pre 96 adoption.
It does mean you have to be more careful with your bonding and
grounding tho.
the ground connection serves 2 purposes

1) a path for lightning
the ground rod is to provide a path for lightning etc.
this NEEDS to be a path to actual Earth ground because that is where lightning will go.

2) protection from shock due to equipment faults
this is to protect you from a shock if the hot wire shorts to the metal case inside an appliance. Think of a motor with all those windings of enameled wire. If the insulation should fail and connect the power to the metal case of the appliance, you can be shocked by touching the appliance. If the case is grounded however,

when the short happens, a large fault current will flow and blow the breaker. For a LARGE fault current to flow, the ground must be low resistance.. So you want a BOND WIRE between the neutral and ground in the system. This provides a path for the fault current to flow sufficient to blow the breaker if there is a ground fault.
Often a ground rod alone is too high resistance.

#2 is an important safety feature, I would not skimp on this.


So if have only 3 wires between the buildings and you can't add the 4th wire, I think bonding the outbuilding neutral and ground together at the entrance to the outbuilding is the safer option compared to relying on a ground rod alone.

You can also add a ground rod there to help for lightning.

If you don't need 240V and need only 120V in the outbuilding, you can use the 3 wires as hot neutral and ground. That is 100% safe and legal but you give up having 240V.



mark


* Done is done , I have bonded the ground/neutral in the sub panel and
added a ground rod out in the shop . Doing without 240V is unacceptable
, I have 2 welders and an air compressor that all need 240V . And plans
are to install a 240V 3 phase motor with a VFD on the mill in the future
. Lightning is unlikely down in The Holler , but still possible . This
is a "hobby" shop , but is very well equipped - pretty much a full
machine and welding shop .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !


That's what I would have done too, except probably adding a second ground
rod. IDK how you're going to install 3 phase eqpt though, without redoing
what you just did and a whole new service, for that matter?


You can get a VFD that is single phase in and 3 phase out


I see, well that solves that.

So here's another puzzling question. In that thread about solar panels
that has now run amok, Danny brought up the issue of preventing backfeeding
into the grid. AFAIK, that's built into the inverters, but how do they
do it? It would seem like the chicken and the egg problem. You need to
detect the grid power going off, but you are connected directly to it and
also powering it. So, how do they detect it? Obviously before connecting
they must first monitor the voltage, freq and phase and sync to it, but
once you connect, how do you then tell the other grid sources are gone?
I guess you could look for voltage drop, since with the grid down
you'd expect 99.9% there will be big voltage decrease. But is that
sufficient? And what do they really do inside those inverters?

Hypothetically, suppose there are 6 houses on a utility line that
have solar and that segment is connected to the whole distribution
system. The sun is shining, those houses are using significantly
less than the panels put out. I cut the line to the rest of the grid,
leaving just those 6 connected. What happens? Is the "grid" down?
How do those inverters detect it? Do they? What happens?
  #35   Report Post  
Old June 11th 19, 10:22 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,924
Default Sub Panel neutral bonding

On 6/11/2019 4:05 PM, wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:21:46 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 12:47:52 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 6/11/2019 8:32 AM,
wrote:

Why is the ground rod at the service any better than the one at the
shop? I agree 4 is better than 2 but they are already bonded together
via the neutral in a 3 wire feeder. I doubt he wants to dig up the
yard. This was done this way for 90 years and we didn't pile up a lot
of bodies. The code change was mostly just to make the language
consistent with the rest of the code. Same with ranges and dryers. The
grandfather clause is still there for things done pre 96 adoption.
It does mean you have to be more careful with your bonding and
grounding tho.
the ground connection serves 2 purposes

1) a path for lightning
the ground rod is to provide a path for lightning etc.
this NEEDS to be a path to actual Earth ground because that is where lightning will go.

2) protection from shock due to equipment faults
this is to protect you from a shock if the hot wire shorts to the metal case inside an appliance. Think of a motor with all those windings of enameled wire. If the insulation should fail and connect the power to the metal case of the appliance, you can be shocked by touching the appliance. If the case is grounded however,

when the short happens, a large fault current will flow and blow the breaker. For a LARGE fault current to flow, the ground must be low resistance. So you want a BOND WIRE between the neutral and ground in the system. This provides a path for the fault current to flow sufficient to blow the breaker if there is a ground fault.
Often a ground rod alone is too high resistance.
#2 is an important safety feature, I would not skimp on this.


So if have only 3 wires between the buildings and you can't add the 4th wire, I think bonding the outbuilding neutral and ground together at the entrance to the outbuilding is the safer option compared to relying on a ground rod alone.

You can also add a ground rod there to help for lightning.

If you don't need 240V and need only 120V in the outbuilding, you can use the 3 wires as hot neutral and ground. That is 100% safe and legal but you give up having 240V.



mark

* Done is done , I have bonded the ground/neutral in the sub panel and
added a ground rod out in the shop . Doing without 240V is unacceptable
, I have 2 welders and an air compressor that all need 240V . And plans
are to install a 240V 3 phase motor with a VFD on the mill in the future
. Lightning is unlikely down in The Holler , but still possible . This
is a "hobby" shop , but is very well equipped - pretty much a full
machine and welding shop .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

That's what I would have done too, except probably adding a second ground
rod. IDK how you're going to install 3 phase eqpt though, without redoing
what you just did and a whole new service, for that matter?

You can get a VFD that is single phase in and 3 phase out

* Oops , I missed t-4's post ... yes , single in and 3 out , 240 is
just more efficient than converting 120 . I'm considering bonding the
structure frame to the ground too - this began life as a 12' x 20' metal
carport . All metal structure with IIRC 8 - 5/8" by 2 foot long spikes
driven into the ground and concrete floor . All it'd take is one lag
screw thru the side of the box and one 2x4 into the vertical tube .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !



  #37   Report Post  
Old June 12th 19, 12:46 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,446
Default Sub Panel neutral bonding

On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 14:20:47 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 5:05:03 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:21:46 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 12:47:52 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 6/11/2019 8:32 AM, wrote:


Why is the ground rod at the service any better than the one at the
shop? I agree 4 is better than 2 but they are already bonded together
via the neutral in a 3 wire feeder. I doubt he wants to dig up the
yard. This was done this way for 90 years and we didn't pile up a lot
of bodies. The code change was mostly just to make the language
consistent with the rest of the code. Same with ranges and dryers. The
grandfather clause is still there for things done pre 96 adoption.
It does mean you have to be more careful with your bonding and
grounding tho.
the ground connection serves 2 purposes

1) a path for lightning
the ground rod is to provide a path for lightning etc.
this NEEDS to be a path to actual Earth ground because that is where lightning will go.

2) protection from shock due to equipment faults
this is to protect you from a shock if the hot wire shorts to the metal case inside an appliance. Think of a motor with all those windings of enameled wire. If the insulation should fail and connect the power to the metal case of the appliance, you can be shocked by touching the appliance. If the case is grounded however,

when the short happens, a large fault current will flow and blow the breaker. For a LARGE fault current to flow, the ground must be low resistance. So you want a BOND WIRE between the neutral and ground in the system. This provides a path for the fault current to flow sufficient to blow the breaker if there is a ground

fault.
Often a ground rod alone is too high resistance.

#2 is an important safety feature, I would not skimp on this.


So if have only 3 wires between the buildings and you can't add the 4th wire, I think bonding the outbuilding neutral and ground together at the entrance to the outbuilding is the safer option compared to relying on a ground rod alone.

You can also add a ground rod there to help for lightning.

If you don't need 240V and need only 120V in the outbuilding, you can use the 3 wires as hot neutral and ground. That is 100% safe and legal but you give up having 240V.



mark


* Done is done , I have bonded the ground/neutral in the sub panel and
added a ground rod out in the shop . Doing without 240V is unacceptable
, I have 2 welders and an air compressor that all need 240V . And plans
are to install a 240V 3 phase motor with a VFD on the mill in the future
. Lightning is unlikely down in The Holler , but still possible . This
is a "hobby" shop , but is very well equipped - pretty much a full
machine and welding shop .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

That's what I would have done too, except probably adding a second ground
rod. IDK how you're going to install 3 phase eqpt though, without redoing
what you just did and a whole new service, for that matter?


You can get a VFD that is single phase in and 3 phase out


I see, well that solves that.

So here's another puzzling question. In that thread about solar panels
that has now run amok, Danny brought up the issue of preventing backfeeding
into the grid. AFAIK, that's built into the inverters, but how do they
do it? It would seem like the chicken and the egg problem. You need to
detect the grid power going off, but you are connected directly to it and
also powering it. So, how do they detect it? Obviously before connecting
they must first monitor the voltage, freq and phase and sync to it, but
once you connect, how do you then tell the other grid sources are gone?
I guess you could look for voltage drop, since with the grid down
you'd expect 99.9% there will be big voltage decrease. But is that
sufficient? And what do they really do inside those inverters?

Hypothetically, suppose there are 6 houses on a utility line that
have solar and that segment is connected to the whole distribution
system. The sun is shining, those houses are using significantly
less than the panels put out. I cut the line to the rest of the grid,
leaving just those 6 connected. What happens? Is the "grid" down?
How do those inverters detect it? Do they? What happens?


We got a pitch on these things a while ago. Basically a grid tie
inverter is clocked from the grid. No grid, no output. They run at a
voltage that can be potentially slightly higher than the grid so if
there is any power left over, it flows backward into the grid. A smart
meter will see that and meter based on your local tariff agreement.
The old style would just run backward if net flow was out instead of
in. If you netted more use than you fed back in, no harm, just a
lower bill. If you showed a negative bill I guess you would be talking
to the PoCo.
That is how people used to steal power, plug the meter in upside down
it runs backward so there is a chance you would be starting in the
fraud department if they did not know about your solar.
The "plug in" collectors plug in just like your toaster and will boost
the power on that side of your service. These things are usually too
small to ever feed back into the grid if you have anything running at
all.
  #38   Report Post  
Old June 12th 19, 12:55 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2014
Posts: 11,930
Default Sub Panel neutral bonding

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 7:46:48 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 14:20:47 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 5:05:03 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:21:46 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 12:47:52 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 6/11/2019 8:32 AM, wrote:


Why is the ground rod at the service any better than the one at the
shop? I agree 4 is better than 2 but they are already bonded together
via the neutral in a 3 wire feeder. I doubt he wants to dig up the
yard. This was done this way for 90 years and we didn't pile up a lot
of bodies. The code change was mostly just to make the language
consistent with the rest of the code. Same with ranges and dryers. The
grandfather clause is still there for things done pre 96 adoption.

  #39   Report Post  
Old June 12th 19, 04:19 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,446
Default Sub Panel neutral bonding

On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:55:43 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 7:46:48 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 14:20:47 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 5:05:03 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:21:46 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 12:47:52 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:
On 6/11/2019 8:32 AM, wrote:


Why is the ground rod at the service any better than the one at the
shop? I agree 4 is better than 2 but they are already bonded together
via the neutral in a 3 wire feeder. I doubt he wants to dig up the
yard. This was done this way for 90 years and we didn't pile up a lot
of bodies. The code change was mostly just to make the language
consistent with the rest of the code. Same with ranges and dryers. The
grandfather clause is still there for things done pre 96 adoption.
It does mean you have to be more careful with your bonding and
grounding tho.
the ground connection serves 2 purposes

1) a path for lightning
the ground rod is to provide a path for lightning etc.
this NEEDS to be a path to actual Earth ground because that is where lightning will go.

2) protection from shock due to equipment faults
this is to protect you from a shock if the hot wire shorts to the metal case inside an appliance. Think of a motor with all those windings of enameled wire. If the insulation should fail and connect the power to the metal case of the appliance, you can be shocked by touching the appliance. If the case is grounded

however,
when the short happens, a large fault current will flow and blow the breaker. For a LARGE fault current to flow, the ground must be low resistance. So you want a BOND WIRE between the neutral and ground in the system. This provides a path for the fault current to flow sufficient to blow the breaker if there is a ground

fault.
Often a ground rod alone is too high resistance.

#2 is an important safety feature, I would not skimp on this.


So if have only 3 wires between the buildings and you can't add the 4th wire, I think bonding the outbuilding neutral and ground together at the entrance to the outbuilding is the safer option compared to relying on a ground rod alone.

You can also add a ground rod there to help for lightning.

If you don't need 240V and need only 120V in the outbuilding, you can use the 3 wires as hot neutral and ground. That is 100% safe and legal but you give up having 240V.



mark


* Done is done , I have bonded the ground/neutral in the sub panel and
added a ground rod out in the shop . Doing without 240V is unacceptable
, I have 2 welders and an air compressor that all need 240V . And plans
are to install a 240V 3 phase motor with a VFD on the mill in the future
. Lightning is unlikely down in The Holler , but still possible . This
is a "hobby" shop , but is very well equipped - pretty much a full
machine and welding shop .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

That's what I would have done too, except probably adding a second ground
rod. IDK how you're going to install 3 phase eqpt though, without redoing
what you just did and a whole new service, for that matter?

You can get a VFD that is single phase in and 3 phase out

I see, well that solves that.

So here's another puzzling question. In that thread about solar panels
that has now run amok, Danny brought up the issue of preventing backfeeding
into the grid. AFAIK, that's built into the inverters, but how do they
do it? It would seem like the chicken and the egg problem. You need to
detect the grid power going off, but you are connected directly to it and
also powering it. So, how do they detect it? Obviously before connecting
they must first monitor the voltage, freq and phase and sync to it, but
once you connect, how do you then tell the other grid sources are gone?
I guess you could look for voltage drop, since with the grid down
you'd expect 99.9% there will be big voltage decrease. But is that
sufficient? And what do they really do inside those inverters?

Hypothetically, suppose there are 6 houses on a utility line that
have solar and that segment is connected to the whole distribution
system. The sun is shining, those houses are using significantly
less than the panels put out. I cut the line to the rest of the grid,
leaving just those 6 connected. What happens? Is the "grid" down?
How do those inverters detect it? Do they? What happens?


We got a pitch on these things a while ago. Basically a grid tie
inverter is clocked from the grid. No grid, no output.


But the question remains, the inverter is part of the grid, the inverters
along the block are part of the grid, in addition to some generators
somewhere. So, how does it know that the "grid" is down?

Hypothetically, suppose there are 6 houses on a utility line that
have solar and that segment is connected to the whole distribution
system. The sun is shining, those houses are using significantly
less than the panels put out. I cut the line to the rest of the grid,
leaving just those 6 connected. What happens? Is the "grid" down?
How do those inverters detect it? Do they? What happens?


That is an interesting question but theoretically each grid tied
inverter would lose clocking and shut down.
I have posed this question to everyone I have talked to without an
answer. What happens if you disconnect from the grid, drop all of
your loads and connect a battery powered inverter. Will that clock
your grid tie and allow you to add loads until you overwhelm it?

They run at a
voltage that can be potentially slightly higher than the grid so if
there is any power left over, it flows backward into the grid. A smart
meter will see that and meter based on your local tariff agreement.
The old style would just run backward if net flow was out instead of
in. If you netted more use than you fed back in, no harm, just a
lower bill. If you showed a negative bill I guess you would be talking
to the PoCo.
That is how people used to steal power, plug the meter in upside down
it runs backward so there is a chance you would be starting in the
fraud department if they did not know about your solar.
The "plug in" collectors plug in just like your toaster and will boost
the power on that side of your service. These things are usually too
small to ever feed back into the grid if you have anything running at
all.


But from everything I see, a 10KW home solar system behaves exactly
like the plug in ones and needs to detect when to disconnect.


That is the way I understand it. Each inverter should detect loss of
grid and shut down. It would be interesting if you had something else
feeding the grid like your generator idea that the plan might fail. I
also doubt there is enough power going into the grid to sustain it if
you are not getting utility power, even if you have a lot of people
with a black roof.
This might work if you had one guy on a street full of solar power
systems with a generator back feeding the street to tickle everyone's
inverter, all residents being frugal and a line cut isolating that
street from the rest of the grid.
It would work until sundown anyway ;-)

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Old June 12th 19, 02:48 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sub Panel neutral bonding



* Done is done , I have bonded the ground/neutral in the sub panel and
added a ground rod out in the shop .

snip...


I agree using the 3 wire system and bonding the neutral and ground is the most practical solution. But be aware, if that third ground/neutral wire should fail open, there will be a dangerous condition in the outbuilding. Everything that was ground, can become energized.



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