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Old February 11th 19, 03:25 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Best kitchen floor surfaces?

On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 10:09:03 AM UTC-5, Davej wrote:
On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 1:22:49 PM UTC-6, trader_4 wrote:
On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:44:27 PM UTC-5, Davej wrote:
My house has some sort of modern tongue-in-groove plank-style
wooden floor...[...] Any suggestions?


Suggestions for what? Replacing the wood floor? Or ideas to
prevent the problems you cite, leaving the floor there? If
it was me and the floor was in good condition, I'd just enjoy
it and look at the positives. Like everything, there are
tradeoffs.


Hey, if there is a way to waterproof it I would be interested
to hear. We thought it was a bit odd to have a wooden kitchen
floor and I have had a few puddles that did soak in a bit.


IDK of any way to waterproof it, but wood floors in kitchens are not
unusual. You see them here in NJ in the more expensive homes. I think
it also depends on the actual wood used. For new floors, most often
it's one of the pre-finished, engineered materials that combine a
substrate with a thinner veneer of the desired wood. They have the
finish applied at the factory and it's harder, more durable, more
resistant to warping, etc. Most of those, the good ones for sure,
can be refinished a couple times too.




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Old February 11th 19, 04:59 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Best kitchen floor surfaces?

On 2/10/2019 12:44 PM, Davej wrote:
My house has some sort of modern tongue-in-groove plank-style
wooden floor throughout the entryways, breakfast area, and
kitchen, installed over the plywood sub-floor. I like the fact
that wood is a comfortable surface for bare feet, but don't
like the fact that every spill of water can be a problem and
every dropped utensil can create another dent or gouge. Any
suggestions?

I wanted hard wood when we built the house almost 10 years ago.
However, we do have a large dog and hard wood was not recommended. So
we put in laminate. It looks as good as when it was new. Yes there
might be a ding here or there, but, it really doesn't show. The
laminate even survived a situation when the fridge decided to turn
itself off when we were on vacation. Water from the freezer did leak
out and swell it a bit but after it dried the swelling now is almost
invisible. In my previous house we had ceramic tile. If you dropped
something glass on it, not only did the glass break, but the tile
usually chipped.
  #23   Report Post  
Old February 11th 19, 07:59 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Best kitchen floor surfaces?



"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 2/11/2019 10:08 AM, Davej wrote:
On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 1:22:49 PM UTC-6, trader_4 wrote:
On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:44:27 PM UTC-5, Davej wrote:
My house has some sort of modern tongue-in-groove plank-style
wooden floor...[...] Any suggestions?

Suggestions for what? Replacing the wood floor? Or ideas to
prevent the problems you cite, leaving the floor there? If
it was me and the floor was in good condition, I'd just enjoy
it and look at the positives. Like everything, there are
tradeoffs.


Hey, if there is a way to waterproof it I would be interested
to hear. We thought it was a bit odd to have a wooden kitchen
floor and I have had a few puddles that did soak in a bit.

A few coats of polyurethane usually works.


Yeah, that’s what I did with some raw edges of chip board
which have laminate on the work surfaces, up against the
wall where they might get some spilled water at times.
Works well, you never get any of the swelling you normally
get with chip board that gets wet.

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Old February 11th 19, 08:54 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 109
Default Best kitchen floor surfaces?

Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/10/2019 6:00 PM, ChairMan wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/10/2019 3:00 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 09:44:25 -0800 (PST), Davej
wrote:

My house has some sort of modern tongue-in-groove plank-style
wooden floor throughout the entryways, breakfast area, and
kitchen, installed over the plywood sub-floor. I like the fact
that wood is a comfortable surface for bare feet, but don't
like the fact that every spill of water can be a problem and
every dropped utensil can create another dent or gouge. Any
suggestions?
Solid premium vinyl
Armstrong used to have (and may still) a solid vinyl line that was
really tough . Bitch to install too , had to warm it up to cut it .
We're undecided whether to carry the (solid 3/4" prefinished
oak)hardwood into the "wet" areas . I planned on ceramic or
porcelain tile in the bathrooms and kitchen work area , but she
kinda likes the idea of it all being hardwood .

It was called Solarian, if memory serves me right and yes a bitch to
install especially in cold weather. I remember epoxy was used on
seams

Yeah , Designer Solarian ! There were cheaper solids that didn't have
the no-wax finish too . Best way we found to fit that stuff was to
scribe a pattern from roofing felt and cut it out before it ever went
into place . Sounds like you know a bit about the business , did y'all
ever go coving ? Roll the flooring 4 1/2" up the wall with an aluminum
cap strip . Fun !


Yup and it too was a pain in the ass. When I was much younger the guy I
worked for did 99% Solarian. He was good at it and I got to do all the
seams, scribing and epoxying.....oh the fun we had : )


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Old February 11th 19, 09:55 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 2,209
Default Best kitchen floor surfaces?

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:00:16 -0600, "ChairMan" no
wrote:

Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/10/2019 3:00 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 09:44:25 -0800 (PST), Davej
wrote:

My house has some sort of modern tongue-in-groove plank-style
wooden floor throughout the entryways, breakfast area, and
kitchen, installed over the plywood sub-floor. I like the fact
that wood is a comfortable surface for bare feet, but don't
like the fact that every spill of water can be a problem and
every dropped utensil can create another dent or gouge. Any
suggestions?
Solid premium vinyl


Armstrong used to have (and may still) a solid vinyl line that was
really tough . Bitch to install too , had to warm it up to cut it .
We're undecided whether to carry the (solid 3/4" prefinished
oak)hardwood into the "wet" areas . I planned on ceramic or porcelain
tile in the bathrooms and kitchen work area , but she kinda likes the
idea of it all being hardwood .


It was called Solarian, if memory serves me right and yes a bitch to install
especially in cold weather. I remember epoxy was used on seams

Custom Solarian solid vinyl - what was installed in our kitchen and
mainfloor bath - It's not Epoxy that is used - but a special vinyl
cement that chemically "welds" the vinyl.

Strange story on ours - we "won" it at a home show - all we had to pay
was the installation. They brought it in about 8am on a cold Ontario
December day and started laying it. They were done well before noon (I
was at work - wife was home). When I got home I found there were 2
corners where it was visibly cracked - due to the "installers" not
knowing what they were doing and working it while still cold and
stiff. I called and told them they had 2 options - and only 2. Eother
come and rip it out and replace it properly, or forget about the
installation fee. They decided it was a lot cheaper to forget the
installation fee. I can live with 2 cracks about 1/2 inch long -
particularly after I glued them - they hardly show even now 20 - some
odd years later.


  #26   Report Post  
Old February 11th 19, 09:58 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2017
Posts: 2,209
Default Best kitchen floor surfaces?

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:07:02 -0600, Terry Coombs
wrote:

On 2/10/2019 6:00 PM, ChairMan wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/10/2019 3:00 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 09:44:25 -0800 (PST), Davej
wrote:

My house has some sort of modern tongue-in-groove plank-style
wooden floor throughout the entryways, breakfast area, and
kitchen, installed over the plywood sub-floor. I like the fact
that wood is a comfortable surface for bare feet, but don't
like the fact that every spill of water can be a problem and
every dropped utensil can create another dent or gouge. Any
suggestions?
Solid premium vinyl
Armstrong used to have (and may still) a solid vinyl line that was
really tough . Bitch to install too , had to warm it up to cut it .
We're undecided whether to carry the (solid 3/4" prefinished
oak)hardwood into the "wet" areas . I planned on ceramic or porcelain
tile in the bathrooms and kitchen work area , but she kinda likes the
idea of it all being hardwood .

It was called Solarian, if memory serves me right and yes a bitch to install
especially in cold weather. I remember epoxy was used on seams


* Yeah , Designer Solarian ! There were cheaper solids that didn't have
the no-wax finish too . Best way we found to fit that stuff was to
scribe a pattern from roofing felt and cut it out before it ever went
into place . Sounds like you know a bit about the business , did y'all
ever go coving ? Roll the flooring 4 1/2" up the wall with an aluminum
cap strip . Fun !

Looks just like Terrazo. Used a lot in institutional installations
where the corners are water-tight and easy to keep clean.
  #27   Report Post  
Old February 15th 19, 06:41 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,012
Default Best kitchen floor surfaces?

Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:00:16 -0600, "ChairMan" no

wrote:

Terry Coombs wrote:
On 2/10/2019 3:00 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 09:44:25 -0800 (PST), Davej
wrote:

My house has some sort of modern tongue-in-groove
plank-style
wooden floor throughout the entryways, breakfast area,
and
kitchen, installed over the plywood sub-floor. I like
the fact
that wood is a comfortable surface for bare feet, but
don't
like the fact that every spill of water can be a
problem and
every dropped utensil can create another dent or
gouge. Any
suggestions?
Solid premium vinyl

Armstrong used to have (and may still) a solid vinyl
line that was
really tough . Bitch to install too , had to warm it up
to cut it .
We're undecided whether to carry the (solid 3/4"
prefinished
oak)hardwood into the "wet" areas . I planned on ceramic
or
porcelain tile in the bathrooms and kitchen work area ,
but she
kinda likes the idea of it all being hardwood .


It was called Solarian, if memory serves me right and yes
a bitch to
install especially in cold weather. I remember epoxy was
used on
seams

Custom Solarian solid vinyl - what was installed in our
kitchen and
mainfloor bath - It's not Epoxy that is used - but a
special vinyl
cement that chemically "welds" the vinyl.


It was two part epoxy when I was installing it, mid 70s it
did change in late 70's early 80s


Strange story on ours - we "won" it at a home show - all
we had to pay
was the installation. They brought it in about 8am on a
cold Ontario
December day and started laying it. They were done well
before noon (I
was at work - wife was home). When I got home I found
there were 2
corners where it was visibly cracked - due to the
"installers" not
knowing what they were doing and working it while still
cold and
stiff. I called and told them they had 2 options - and
only 2. Eother
come and rip it out and replace it properly, or forget
about the
installation fee. They decided it was a lot cheaper to
forget the
installation fee. I can live with 2 cracks about 1/2 inch
long -
particularly after I glued them - they hardly show even
now 20 - some
odd years later.






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