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Old September 29th 16, 02:18 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

A friend of mine asked me today why the electrical outlets in my house were
"upside down". They are positioned with the ground pin hole at the top and
the two slots of the outlet on the bottom. I agree that, to me, they "look"
like they are upside down, and I think they would "look" better with the
ground pin hole on the bottom. But, my belief is that the National
Electrical Code (NEC) is silent on this question and that there is no right
or wrong orientation for electrical outlets.

My friend said that he has had code enforcement officials tell him that
electrical outlets with the ground pin hole on top were "upside down" and
that they needed to be reversed to be with the ground pin on the bottom to
pass the electrical inspection.

Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside down" and the
other way is the "correct" orientation?


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Old September 29th 16, 02:57 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

On 9/28/2016 9:18 PM, TomR wrote:
A friend of mine asked me today why the electrical outlets in my house
were "upside down". They are positioned with the ground pin hole at the
top and the two slots of the outlet on the bottom. I agree that, to me,
they "look" like they are upside down, and I think they would "look"
better with the ground pin hole on the bottom. But, my belief is that
the National Electrical Code (NEC) is silent on this question and that
there is no right or wrong orientation for electrical outlets.

My friend said that he has had code enforcement officials tell him that
electrical outlets with the ground pin hole on top were "upside down"
and that they needed to be reversed to be with the ground pin on the
bottom to pass the electrical inspection.

Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside down" and
the other way is the "correct" orientation?



This was discussed recently. Some inspectors want the pin up. The
reason is that in an office a paper clip fell and hit the prongs of a
plug that was not pushed in fully. Pin up would not let it short.
IIRC, national code does not mention it.
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Old September 29th 16, 03:16 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

I don't know about nationally but I know
in the state of MA there's no spec. It can
be either way. State code is what you should
be concerned with.

"TomR" wrote

| Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside down" and
the
| other way is the "correct" orientation?
|


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Old September 29th 16, 05:21 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

On Wed, 28 Sep 2016 21:18:13 -0400, "TomR" wrote:

A friend of mine asked me today why the electrical outlets in my house were
"upside down". They are positioned with the ground pin hole at the top and
the two slots of the outlet on the bottom. I agree that, to me, they "look"
like they are upside down, and I think they would "look" better with the
ground pin hole on the bottom. But, my belief is that the National
Electrical Code (NEC) is silent on this question and that there is no right
or wrong orientation for electrical outlets.

My friend said that he has had code enforcement officials tell him that
electrical outlets with the ground pin hole on top were "upside down" and
that they needed to be reversed to be with the ground pin on the bottom to
pass the electrical inspection.

Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside down" and the
other way is the "correct" orientation?


Short answer, No. There is no rule about how they are mounted and
there is even a school of thought that ground up is better. Something
falling between the plug and the wall would hit the ground.

Typically when a receptacle is different than the rest, it is
switched.
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Old September 29th 16, 05:44 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

On Thu, 29 Sep 2016 00:21:29 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 28 Sep 2016 21:18:13 -0400, "TomR" wrote:

A friend of mine asked me today why the electrical outlets in my house were
"upside down". They are positioned with the ground pin hole at the top and
the two slots of the outlet on the bottom. I agree that, to me, they "look"
like they are upside down, and I think they would "look" better with the
ground pin hole on the bottom. But, my belief is that the National
Electrical Code (NEC) is silent on this question and that there is no right
or wrong orientation for electrical outlets.

My friend said that he has had code enforcement officials tell him that
electrical outlets with the ground pin hole on top were "upside down" and
that they needed to be reversed to be with the ground pin on the bottom to
pass the electrical inspection.

Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside down" and the
other way is the "correct" orientation?


Short answer, No. There is no rule about how they are mounted and
there is even a school of thought that ground up is better. Something
falling between the plug and the wall would hit the ground.

Typically when a receptacle is different than the rest, it is
switched.


I think they look stupid when they are upside down (ground on top). I
put them with ground on bottom because thats what I'm used to and what
looks best. I dont make a habit of dropping paper clips on plugs, and
actually if a metal object was to fall on a loose plug, it could contact
the ground as well as the hot terminal too (with the ground on top).

Any inspector who wont pass someone's wiring because of the mounting
direction of outlets is an idiot. I'd like to see that one taken in
front of a board of electricians. It's not code, so it cant be enforced
either way.




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Old September 29th 16, 11:45 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

TomR explained on 9/28/2016 :
A friend of mine asked me today why the electrical outlets in my house were
"upside down". They are positioned with the ground pin hole at the top and
the two slots of the outlet on the bottom. I agree that, to me, they "look"
like they are upside down, and I think they would "look" better with the
ground pin hole on the bottom. But, my belief is that the National
Electrical Code (NEC) is silent on this question and that there is no right
or wrong orientation for electrical outlets.

My friend said that he has had code enforcement officials tell him that
electrical outlets with the ground pin hole on top were "upside down" and
that they needed to be reversed to be with the ground pin on the bottom to
pass the electrical inspection.

Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside down" and the
other way is the "correct" orientation?


No, but some installations such as hospitals might dictate the ground
up preference. Some equipment designed for hospitals and such might
have cords with right-angle plugs on the end which expect the
ground-up orientation. As someone else has mentioned, there may be
locals codes to consider where NEC is agnostic on the matter.

You are probably right, your friend is probably wrong, and his
enforcement official should be able to cite an official local code to
remove the 'probably' from those statements. If he does cite a source,
I would like to see it because no such source has ever been cited
before as far as I know.
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Old September 29th 16, 11:55 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?


news 04:44:33 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

Any inspector who wont pass someone's wiring because of the
mounting direction of outlets is an idiot. I'd like to see that
one taken in front of a board of electricians. It's not code, so
it cant be enforced either way.


If local code exists specifying ground pin up in a specific location,
it's to be ground pin up. Just because NEC doesn't care one way or
another doesn't mean you'll have power connected because you chose to
violate local code. You'll **** off the inspector, they'll be a real
hardass when they come to inspect you for the second time.

Until you pass inspection, your jobsite doesn't go farther than temp
power and, as the name implies, it's temporary power. Keep ****ing
around, you won't even have temp power on the jobsite. Nobody will
like you then.

Word may get around that you're a troublemaker, too. Until your work
passes their inspection, the power company isn't going to hook up
permanent power. Having the reputation as a troublemaker and one who
holds up job sites can put you out of business. Nobody wants to deal
with a self righteous asshat who costs them more time and money.

Arguing with an electrical inspector is like wrestling with a pig in
the mud. Sooner or later, you'll realize, the pig is enjoying it.



--
People you encounter every day are fighting battles you know nothing
about. Be kind.
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Old September 29th 16, 12:39 PM posted to alt.home.repair,alt.usenet.kooks
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

On 9/28/2016 6:18 PM, TomR wrote:
A friend of mine asked me today why the electrical outlets in my house
were "upside down". They are positioned with the ground pin hole at the
top and the two slots of the outlet on the bottom. I agree that, to me,
they "look" like they are upside down, and I think they would "look"
better with the ground pin hole on the bottom. But, my belief is that
the National Electrical Code (NEC) is silent on this question and that
there is no right or wrong orientation for electrical outlets.

My friend said that he has had code enforcement officials tell him that
electrical outlets with the ground pin hole on top were "upside down"
and that they needed to be reversed to be with the ground pin on the
bottom to pass the electrical inspection.

Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside down" and
the other way is the "correct" orientation?



This is a question I tackled, successfully, years ago, here at Sunset
Chateau.
The neutral pin on the top is a safety precaution all us expert
electrical types know about and perform on a routine basis. The purpose
of such arrangement is to prevent a short should, for example, someone
drop a metal object on partially exposed pins.

May the Eye of Horus be which you.


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Old September 29th 16, 12:41 PM posted to alt.home.repair,uk.rec.driving
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

On 9/28/2016 9:21 PM, wrote:
Typically when a receptacle is different than the rest, it is
switched.


Uh....well.....true....... And the same can be said of Ladyboys.
Did you know that?

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Old September 29th 16, 02:26 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

On Thursday, September 29, 2016 at 7:39:29 AM UTC-4, Colonel Edmund J. Burke wrote:
On 9/28/2016 6:18 PM, TomR wrote:
A friend of mine asked me today why the electrical outlets in my house
were "upside down". They are positioned with the ground pin hole at the
top and the two slots of the outlet on the bottom. I agree that, to me,
they "look" like they are upside down, and I think they would "look"
better with the ground pin hole on the bottom. But, my belief is that
the National Electrical Code (NEC) is silent on this question and that
there is no right or wrong orientation for electrical outlets.

My friend said that he has had code enforcement officials tell him that
electrical outlets with the ground pin hole on top were "upside down"
and that they needed to be reversed to be with the ground pin on the
bottom to pass the electrical inspection.

Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside down" and
the other way is the "correct" orientation?



This is a question I tackled, successfully, years ago, here at Sunset
Chateau.
The neutral pin on the top is a safety precaution all us expert
electrical types know about and perform on a routine basis. The purpose
of such arrangement is to prevent a short should, for example, someone
drop a metal object on partially exposed pins.


Neutral pin? On the top?

That can only happen if the receptacle is mounted sideways. I'd hardly
consider that to be "routine".


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