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[email protected] April 6th 18 04:21 AM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 19:01:51 -0400, wrote:

On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 22:14:01 GMT, im2oldBob
om wrote:

replying to hrhofmann, im2oldBob wrote:
In a textbook, Electric Wiring Residential 15th edition based on 2005 National
Electrical Code by Ray C Mullen. ISBN1-4018-5019-. Mr. Mullen addresses the
subject. Mr. Mullen' advocates, that while not a code requirement that the
ground ( U blade) should be up for the reason that conductive items falling
would encounter the ground first, or at least fall across either one of the
conductors and the U blade if the conductor was positive then a shunt trip
would occur. Note; this is not an exact quote.


The only "book" that counts is the National Electrical Code and it is
silent on the issue.
If you look long enough you will find people arguing the opposite
case. When a plug loosens and starts falling out, ground down assures
the ground connection is the last to break.
Neither are a significant enough reason to drive a code change.


Install them any way you like. The code allows both ways. I personally
like the traditional way of putting the ground on the bottom. Wehn I
moved into my house, I had 2 outlets with the ground on top. That drove
me crazy. At least make them all the same in the same home. (I finally
rotated those two).


Ed Pawlowski April 6th 18 01:20 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On 4/5/2018 11:21 PM, wrote:


The only "book" that counts is the National Electrical Code and it is
silent on the issue.
If you look long enough you will find people arguing the opposite
case. When a plug loosens and starts falling out, ground down assures
the ground connection is the last to break.
Neither are a significant enough reason to drive a code change.


Install them any way you like. The code allows both ways. I personally
like the traditional way of putting the ground on the bottom. Wehn I
moved into my house, I had 2 outlets with the ground on top. That drove
me crazy. At least make them all the same in the same home. (I finally
rotated those two).


Depends on where you live. In the town where I worked, the inspector
wanted them with pin up. Yeah, you can argue with him, we put them pin
up.

Ralph Mowery April 6th 18 03:31 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
In article ,
says...

Install them any way you like. The code allows both ways. I personally
like the traditional way of putting the ground on the bottom. Wehn I
moved into my house, I had 2 outlets with the ground on top. That drove
me crazy. At least make them all the same in the same home. (I finally
rotated those two).




Put the ground terminal down. It makes it lookd like a smiling face.


Clare Snyder April 6th 18 07:08 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 08:20:30 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 4/5/2018 11:21 PM, wrote:


The only "book" that counts is the National Electrical Code and it is
silent on the issue.
If you look long enough you will find people arguing the opposite
case. When a plug loosens and starts falling out, ground down assures
the ground connection is the last to break.
Neither are a significant enough reason to drive a code change.


Install them any way you like. The code allows both ways. I personally
like the traditional way of putting the ground on the bottom. Wehn I
moved into my house, I had 2 outlets with the ground on top. That drove
me crazy. At least make them all the same in the same home. (I finally
rotated those two).


Depends on where you live. In the town where I worked, the inspector
wanted them with pin up. Yeah, you can argue with him, we put them pin
up.

Another case of a prick throwing his weight around with nothing to
back him up.

Heshould be in the white house - - -

=?iso-8859-15?Q?Tekkie=AE?= April 6th 18 07:48 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
posted for all of us...



On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 20:00:12 -0400, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 19:01:51 -0400,
wrote:

On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 22:14:01 GMT, im2oldBob
[email protected] com wrote:

replying to hrhofmann, im2oldBob wrote:
In a textbook, Electric Wiring Residential 15th edition based on 2005 National
Electrical Code by Ray C Mullen. ISBN1-4018-5019-. Mr. Mullen addresses the
subject. Mr. Mullen' advocates, that while not a code requirement that the
ground ( U blade) should be up for the reason that conductive items falling
would encounter the ground first, or at least fall across either one of the
conductors and the U blade if the conductor was positive then a shunt trip
would occur. Note; this is not an exact quote.

The only "book" that counts is the National Electrical Code and it is
silent on the issue.
If you look long enough you will find people arguing the opposite
case. When a plug loosens and starts falling out, ground down assures
the ground connection is the last to break.
Neither are a significant enough reason to drive a code change.



This has been an item of discussion and dissagreement for several
years. Traditionally american style 2 terminal (grounded) outlets have
been installed ground down.
There is also something of a tradition of "switched" outlets being
installed ground side up.

The ground down tradition has pretty well mandated that right angle
plugs have the terminals oriented so that the cable, when plugged into
the oputlet, runs DOWN the wall so gravity aids inkeeping the plug
installed rather than trying to pull it out, as it cones off the top
of the plug..

Non grounded polarized plugs are also trtaditionally installed with
the large (neutral) blade on the left.


Just install one of these and be done with it.

https://static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/6C567_AS01?$mdmain$


Yeah, that's the ticket. Use this as your universal response for this never
ending question.

--
Tekkie

Ralph Mowery April 6th 18 09:18 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
In article , says...

https://static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/6C567_AS01?$mdmain$


Yeah, that's the ticket. Use this as your universal response for this never
ending question.




Sometimes I wish I had some like that. If you buy something with a plug
where the cord comes out of the bottom/side or anything but the back of
the plug. Just needs some at the 45 deg angle for an odd plug or two
that I have.

[email protected] April 7th 18 12:03 AM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 14:48:20 -0400, Tekkie® wrote:

posted for all of us...



On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 20:00:12 -0400, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 19:01:51 -0400, wrote:

On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 22:14:01 GMT, im2oldBob
[email protected] com wrote:

replying to hrhofmann, im2oldBob wrote:
In a textbook, Electric Wiring Residential 15th edition based on 2005 National
Electrical Code by Ray C Mullen. ISBN1-4018-5019-. Mr. Mullen addresses the
subject. Mr. Mullen' advocates, that while not a code requirement that the
ground ( U blade) should be up for the reason that conductive items falling
would encounter the ground first, or at least fall across either one of the
conductors and the U blade if the conductor was positive then a shunt trip
would occur. Note; this is not an exact quote.

The only "book" that counts is the National Electrical Code and it is
silent on the issue.
If you look long enough you will find people arguing the opposite
case. When a plug loosens and starts falling out, ground down assures
the ground connection is the last to break.
Neither are a significant enough reason to drive a code change.


This has been an item of discussion and dissagreement for several
years. Traditionally american style 2 terminal (grounded) outlets have
been installed ground down.
There is also something of a tradition of "switched" outlets being
installed ground side up.

The ground down tradition has pretty well mandated that right angle
plugs have the terminals oriented so that the cable, when plugged into
the oputlet, runs DOWN the wall so gravity aids inkeeping the plug
installed rather than trying to pull it out, as it cones off the top
of the plug..

Non grounded polarized plugs are also trtaditionally installed with
the large (neutral) blade on the left.


Just install one of these and be done with it.

https://static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/6C567_AS01?$mdmain$


Yeah, that's the ticket. Use this as your universal response for this never
ending question.


The first one I ever saw was from Jim Pawley (VP SqD) at an inspector
seminar. It always gets a laugh and points out the silliness of the
debate.

[email protected] April 7th 18 12:04 AM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 16:18:44 -0400, Ralph Mowery
wrote:

In article , says...

https://static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/6C567_AS01?$mdmain$


Yeah, that's the ticket. Use this as your universal response for this never
ending question.




Sometimes I wish I had some like that. If you buy something with a plug
where the cord comes out of the bottom/side or anything but the back of
the plug. Just needs some at the 45 deg angle for an odd plug or two
that I have.


It is a hubbel part that you can get at any real electrical supplier
or on line. It goes in a 1900 box and a ring is available.

Barman April 21st 18 07:44 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
replying to Clare Snyder, Barman wrote:
I had a case where the inspector insisted I rotate all the outlets so that
ground was down, my argument was if I had the outlets mounted horizontally
(eg. kitchen backsplash) what direction would he want the ground.

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/mainte...e-1110235-.htm



Clare Snyder April 21st 18 08:33 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Sat, 21 Apr 2018 18:44:04 GMT, Barman
m wrote:

replying to Clare Snyder, Barman wrote:
I had a case where the inspector insisted I rotate all the outlets so that
ground was down, my argument was if I had the outlets mounted horizontally
(eg. kitchen backsplash) what direction would he want the ground.



If the inspector is that anal he'll want the ground to the left
(neutral up)


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