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-   -   Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code? (https://www.diybanter.com/home-repair/402178-electrical-outlets-upside-down-code.html)

DerbyDad03 October 6th 16 03:40 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Thursday, October 6, 2016 at 10:18:00 AM UTC-4, Mark Lloyd wrote:
On 10/05/2016 02:00 PM, wrote:
bob haller:

Understand the reasoning behind it, but I think
it would make sense the other way round:

Always on: Ground pin up
Switched: pin down.


Is there some reason for that, other than it would mean most of the
receptacles would be ground-up.

Also, how would you install a duplex receptacle where only one side is
switched?


You cut the tab between the 2 Hot screws and wire one with a switched hot
wire and the other with an "always hot" wire (or another switched hot).

Here is the basic concept for one switched receptacle, the actual physical
wiring can vary. Note the missing connection between the 2 hot screws.
The tab for the neutrals is left intact.

http://www.electrical101.com/wpimage...ng-diagram.png

DerbyDad03 October 6th 16 03:54 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Thursday, October 6, 2016 at 10:18:00 AM UTC-4, Mark Lloyd wrote:
On 10/05/2016 02:00 PM, wrote:
bob haller:

Understand the reasoning behind it, but I think
it would make sense the other way round:

Always on: Ground pin up
Switched: pin down.


Is there some reason for that, other than it would mean most of the
receptacles would be ground-up.

Also, how would you install a duplex receptacle where only one side is
switched?


P.S. I have a split/switched receptacle in my garage, but for a very
strange reason.

I inherited an old 19" TV from my Dad. The picture doesn't go off when
you press the power button or use the remote. The sound goes off but the
picture stays on. You have to kill the AC input to turn it off completely,
so I split a duplex and added a switch. A one-time wiring job was easier
than using the plug to turn it on and off every time.

Here's the even stranger part: When you reapply the power, all you get is
snow. You still have to press the power button or use the remote to *really*
turn it on.

TomR[_3_] October 6th 16 08:35 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
In ,
typed:
On Wed, 5 Oct 2016 10:28:37 -0400, "TomR" wrote:

In ,
bob haller typed:
On Wednesday, September 28, 2016 at 9:18:14 PM UTC-4, TomR wrote:
A friend of mine asked me today why the electrical outlets in my
house were "upside down". They are positioned with the ground pin
hole at the top and the two slots of the outlet on the bottom. I
agree that, to me, they "look" like they are upside down, and I
think they would "look" better with the ground pin hole on the
bottom. But, my belief is that the National Electrical Code (NEC)
is silent on this question and that there is no right or wrong
orientation for electrical outlets.

My friend said that he has had code enforcement officials tell him
that electrical outlets with the ground pin hole on top were
"upside down" and that they needed to be reversed to be with the
ground pin on the bottom to pass the electrical inspection.

Is there anything in the NEC that says that one way is "upside
down" and the other way is the "correct" orientation?


homes in florida often have outlets in the same home orientated both
ways

ground pin down for always on, ground pin up for switched outlets


I wonder why that would be the criteria for ground pin up vs. down.


. . . . . On a "half hot"
the bottom one is switched.


Interesting. Good to know. I like to do the "half hot" switched outlet
routine once in a while, so it's good to know that the bottom one is
typically the switch-controlled half.



trader_4 October 6th 16 08:42 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Thursday, October 6, 2016 at 10:18:00 AM UTC-4, Mark Lloyd wrote:
On 10/05/2016 02:00 PM, wrote:
bob haller:

Understand the reasoning behind it, but I think
it would make sense the other way round:

Always on: Ground pin up
Switched: pin down.


Is there some reason for that, other than it would mean most of the
receptacles would be ground-up.


Following the only thing I've seen here cited as any reason for
ground up, you'd want the ground up on the ones that are permanently
on, because they are most likely to be energized and if a metal
object drops onto partially inserted pins, it will hit the ground pin.


Also, how would you install a duplex receptacle where only one side is
switched?


I'd do it with the top one live, because a lamp or similar could be
plugged in below on the switched one, leaving the upper one easier
to access.



--
80 days until the winter celebration (Sunday December 25, 2016 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).

Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"The cosmos is interesting rather than perfect, and everything is not
part of some greater plan, nor is all necessarily under control."
[Starhawk]



gdmellott January 26th 18 04:14 AM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
replying to Jes Doit, gdmellott wrote:
There is ah... not a mouse in my wall.

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/mainte...e-1110235-.htm



gdmellott January 26th 18 05:44 AM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
replying to gfretwell, gdmellott wrote:
Let's face it. There are parasitic loads ( both psychologically and
substantively evidenced) what ever ways its oriented.

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/mainte...e-1110235-.htm



im2oldBob April 5th 18 11:14 PM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
replying to hrhofmann, im2oldBob wrote:
In a textbook, Electric Wiring Residential 15th edition based on 2005 National
Electrical Code by Ray C Mullen. ISBN1-4018-5019-. Mr. Mullen addresses the
subject. Mr. Mullen' advocates, that while not a code requirement that the
ground ( U blade) should be up for the reason that conductive items falling
would encounter the ground first, or at least fall across either one of the
conductors and the U blade if the conductor was positive then a shunt trip
would occur. Note; this is not an exact quote.

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/mainte...e-1110235-.htm



[email protected] April 6th 18 12:01 AM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 22:14:01 GMT, im2oldBob
m wrote:

replying to hrhofmann, im2oldBob wrote:
In a textbook, Electric Wiring Residential 15th edition based on 2005 National
Electrical Code by Ray C Mullen. ISBN1-4018-5019-. Mr. Mullen addresses the
subject. Mr. Mullen' advocates, that while not a code requirement that the
ground ( U blade) should be up for the reason that conductive items falling
would encounter the ground first, or at least fall across either one of the
conductors and the U blade if the conductor was positive then a shunt trip
would occur. Note; this is not an exact quote.


The only "book" that counts is the National Electrical Code and it is
silent on the issue.
If you look long enough you will find people arguing the opposite
case. When a plug loosens and starts falling out, ground down assures
the ground connection is the last to break.
Neither are a significant enough reason to drive a code change.

Clare Snyder April 6th 18 01:00 AM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 19:01:51 -0400, wrote:

On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 22:14:01 GMT, im2oldBob
om wrote:

replying to hrhofmann, im2oldBob wrote:
In a textbook, Electric Wiring Residential 15th edition based on 2005 National
Electrical Code by Ray C Mullen. ISBN1-4018-5019-. Mr. Mullen addresses the
subject. Mr. Mullen' advocates, that while not a code requirement that the
ground ( U blade) should be up for the reason that conductive items falling
would encounter the ground first, or at least fall across either one of the
conductors and the U blade if the conductor was positive then a shunt trip
would occur. Note; this is not an exact quote.


The only "book" that counts is the National Electrical Code and it is
silent on the issue.
If you look long enough you will find people arguing the opposite
case. When a plug loosens and starts falling out, ground down assures
the ground connection is the last to break.
Neither are a significant enough reason to drive a code change.



This has been an item of discussion and dissagreement for several
years. Traditionally american style 2 terminal (grounded) outlets have
been installed ground down.
There is also something of a tradition of "switched" outlets being
installed ground side up.

The ground down tradition has pretty well mandated that right angle
plugs have the terminals oriented so that the cable, when plugged into
the oputlet, runs DOWN the wall so gravity aids inkeeping the plug
installed rather than trying to pull it out, as it cones off the top
of the plug..

Non grounded polarized plugs are also trtaditionally installed with
the large (neutral) blade on the left.

[email protected] April 6th 18 02:29 AM

Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?
 
On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 20:00:12 -0400, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 19:01:51 -0400, wrote:

On Thu, 05 Apr 2018 22:14:01 GMT, im2oldBob
[email protected] com wrote:

replying to hrhofmann, im2oldBob wrote:
In a textbook, Electric Wiring Residential 15th edition based on 2005 National
Electrical Code by Ray C Mullen. ISBN1-4018-5019-. Mr. Mullen addresses the
subject. Mr. Mullen' advocates, that while not a code requirement that the
ground ( U blade) should be up for the reason that conductive items falling
would encounter the ground first, or at least fall across either one of the
conductors and the U blade if the conductor was positive then a shunt trip
would occur. Note; this is not an exact quote.


The only "book" that counts is the National Electrical Code and it is
silent on the issue.
If you look long enough you will find people arguing the opposite
case. When a plug loosens and starts falling out, ground down assures
the ground connection is the last to break.
Neither are a significant enough reason to drive a code change.



This has been an item of discussion and dissagreement for several
years. Traditionally american style 2 terminal (grounded) outlets have
been installed ground down.
There is also something of a tradition of "switched" outlets being
installed ground side up.

The ground down tradition has pretty well mandated that right angle
plugs have the terminals oriented so that the cable, when plugged into
the oputlet, runs DOWN the wall so gravity aids inkeeping the plug
installed rather than trying to pull it out, as it cones off the top
of the plug..

Non grounded polarized plugs are also trtaditionally installed with
the large (neutral) blade on the left.


Just install one of these and be done with it.

https://static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/6C567_AS01?$mdmain$


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