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micky October 12th 14 08:17 PM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?
 
Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?

The fixture will be mounted about 24 feet above the ground so it has to
be bright.

The people who rate the one below say it's very bright, but have they
ever looked into a 100 watt incandescent floodlight? It's probably
blinding, so I'm not sure the raters' opinions are really comparisons.

The one below at Home Depot from Lithonia Lighting says it has "2
efficient 10-watt LEDs" where the two incandescent lights would
otherwise be. The picture shows two circular devices, each divided
into 3 120-degree parts, with what looks like a small concave reflector
with an LED in the middle of each part. I guess they are saying the 3
together use 10 watts. Are there really 3 1/3 watt LEDs, and is 10
watts from an LED as much light as 100 watts incandescent?? That's what
the floodlights use now, 200 watts total per fixture.

The maker's website
http://www.lithonia.com/commercial/2....VDrPJ 1fDuM0
says "Each head contains (3) 4780K high performance LEDs. Lumen output
of 1,222 is maintained at 50,000 hour life. LED driver is 120V and
operates at 60Hz."

I like the idea of LED, because it's very difficult to change the bulb
on one of my two** double-flloodlights.***, but not if it's not going to
light up the area.

Mostly what I'm looking for is a light that won't go on because of the
wind, but will go on when a person walks by.

This one, despite the high price, $116, only has 6 LEDs (2 by HD's
counting method!).
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Lithonia-...O-BZ/202598344

The same thing with three sets of three LEDs is 150 dollars, implying
that one group of three and the holder is $34
The same thing with photocell but no motion sensor is 98 dollars,
impliying that they're only charging 18 dollars for the motion sensor
and most of the price is for the LEDs.

Thanks.


Details that the electronics guys may find boring. Hey, everyone may
find them boring!
**The other floodlight in the back of the house I put in right under my
bedroom window, so I can just lean out and change the bulb. I wired it
from the receptacle just below the window, so little effort to run the
wires, and it sure looks better than several of my neighbors' who let an
electrician or handyman run surface Romex or conduit from the back porch
light, most of whom no longer have a back porch light.

*** It's chest high when I'm in the attic, so that's about 24 feet (?,
two story house, plus attic. The first floor is about a foot above the
ground.) and I don't have a ladder that long. What I've done to adjust
the light sensor and change the bulb is to unscrew the winged folding
toggle nut inside the attic, remove the big washer, disconnect the Romex
and tie a string to the end of the wire, and lower the whole fixture to
the ground. Do my work there, and pull tthe fixture back up. The hard
parts are getting the romex through its hole, and gettting the long
screw to go though its assigned hole (which is a lot bigger than the
screw, but still not easy to find) so I can screw the toggle nut back
on. I've done this twice with no more than 10 minutes each time trying
to get the screw through, but I fear some time it will take me hours,
and it woudl be nice if it used LED's and never burned out. But at 23
feet high, the light has to be bright!!

Bob F October 12th 14 08:53 PM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?
 
micky wrote:
Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?


The city street lights on my block are now LEDs, and they are plenty bright.



N8N[_2_] October 12th 14 09:00 PM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?
 
On Sunday, October 12, 2014 3:17:59 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:
Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?


Short answer, absolutely.

Long answer, make sure you look at the lumen output and beam angle specs for the specific light you are considering using, compared/contrasted to those for the conventional (100W, 200W, etc.) incandescent that you would otherwise use for that location. Do NOT trust the "wattage equivalent" verbiage on the packaging; pretty much all manufacturers of LED lighting fudge those a little bit, especially with screw in A19 and other similar formats commonly used as household lighting.

nate

trader_4 October 12th 14 09:13 PM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?
 
On Sunday, October 12, 2014 4:00:46 PM UTC-4, N8N wrote:
On Sunday, October 12, 2014 3:17:59 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?




Short answer, absolutely.



Long answer, make sure you look at the lumen output and beam angle specs for the specific light you are considering using, compared/contrasted to those for the conventional (100W, 200W, etc.) incandescent that you would otherwise use for that location. Do NOT trust the "wattage equivalent" verbiage on the packaging; pretty much all manufacturers of LED lighting fudge those a little bit, especially with screw in A19 and other similar formats commonly used as household lighting.



nate


+1

dadiOH[_3_] October 12th 14 09:36 PM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?
 
"micky" wrote in message

Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?

The fixture will be mounted about 24 feet above the ground so it has to
be bright.

The people who rate the one below say it's very bright, but have they
ever looked into a 100 watt incandescent floodlight? It's probably
blinding, so I'm not sure the raters' opinions are really comparisons.

The one below at Home Depot from Lithonia Lighting says it has "2
efficient 10-watt LEDs" where the two incandescent lights would
otherwise be. The picture shows two circular devices, each divided
into 3 120-degree parts, with what looks like a small concave reflector
with an LED in the middle of each part. I guess they are saying the 3
together use 10 watts. Are there really 3 1/3 watt LEDs, and is 10
watts from an LED as much light as 100 watts incandescent?? That's what
the floodlights use now, 200 watts total per fixture.


Compare lumens, no watts. Watts= enegy to produce lumens.

A reflector also makes a huge difference over a raw bulb. Type of
reflector also makes a difference...a given area at a given distance from
the light source will receive more light from a narrow beam reflector than
from a wide beam reflector.

--

dadiOH
____________________________

Winters getting colder? Tired of the rat race?
Taxes out of hand? Maybe just ready for a change?
Check it out... http://www.floridaloghouse.net


Jeff Liebermann October 12th 14 09:37 PM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?
 
On Sun, 12 Oct 2014 15:17:59 -0400, micky
wrote:

Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?


Yes. Spend $15 or more on a Lux Meter (photometer), measure the spot
intensities, and see for yourself:
www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=lux+meter+photometer
I have one of these:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/110764870937

However, there's a problem. The total light output of an LED light is
rated in lumens, not lux. Lux is just the intensity at a given point.
Focus the beam, and you get a really high lux value. Spread it out
into your floodlight, and the intensity is much less. Lumens is the
total output, in all directions. The right way to measure that is
with an integrating sphe
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrating_sphere
My way is much easier, but not terribly accurate. However, it will do
nicely for comparisons. I recently threw together the procedure and
posted it to the rec.bicycles.tech newsgroup. Cut-n-pasted:

1. Point light at the wall in a dark room at a distance of 1 meter.
There's nothing sacred about the 1 meter distance. If 1 meter seems
too close, just pick another distance.

2. Measure the spot diameter on the wall. If the light slowly fades
away from the hot spot, just guess the half brightness points. If the
spot is oval shaped, measure both the maximum and minimum diameters
and calculate an average.

3. At the same 1 meter distance, use the Lux meter to measure the
brightness. This is not really correct, since lumens is the total
brightness, including the over spray. The brightness will also follow
a Gaussian curve over the spot diameter.

4. Calculate the beam width in degrees. Dust off the long forgotten
inverse trigonometric functions on your calculator:
Beam_width_in_degrees = 2 * arctan (spot_radius/dist)
whe
spot_radius = 1/2 * spot diameter, in your favorite units of measure
dist = distance between light and spot in same units of measure.

5. Using the values of lux, distance, and beamwidth, plug into one of
the calculators at:
http://www.ledrise.com/shop_content.php?coID=19
https://ledstuff.co.nz/data_calculators.php
to obtain lumens.

I would be interested in collecting results as I only have a few
bicycle lights and flashlights suitable for testing. Please include
measurements, maker, model, battery type, manufacturers rated lumens,
and condition of battery (new, used, old, leaking, dead). So far:

Light spot_dia dist width bright calc mfg
(cm) (cm) (deg) (lux) (lumens) (lumens)
5w Cree light hi 80 100 43.6 480 216 500
5w Cree light hi 51 100 28.6 900 175 500
5w Cree light lo 80 100 43.6 140 63 ?
Planet Bike 1 watt 20 100 11.4 3000 93 76 (new batt)
Maglite 3D LED 13 100 7.4 3600 47 131 (old batt)

There are other problems when comparing LED and incandescent
brightness. The spectra is not the same. Therefore the perceived
brightness will vary with the color temperature. Most lights have
some amount of over-spray outside of the spot area. The lux meter
will not capture these, resulting in some error. The intensity across
the spot is not uniform but tends to follow a Gaussian curve. Some
lights have a very hot spot in the middle, and then just fade out
towards the edges. Do your best and see how close to the rated lumens
you get.

Good luck.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Mark[_43_] October 12th 14 09:48 PM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?
 
On 10/12/2014 3:17 PM, micky wrote:
Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?

The fixture will be mounted about 24 feet above the ground so it has to
be bright.

The people who rate the one below say it's very bright, but have they
ever looked into a 100 watt incandescent floodlight? It's probably
blinding, so I'm not sure the raters' opinions are really comparisons.

The one below at Home Depot from Lithonia Lighting says it has "2


Can't help you out on the question. But, I installed 21 Lithonia LED
can lights throughout my place. They cost a bit more than other brands,
but been real pleased with the lights/looks. Had to have 1 replacement
afterwards, and they sent me 2 with no questions asked.


Trevor Wilson October 12th 14 10:58 PM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?
 
On 13/10/2014 6:17 AM, micky wrote:
Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?

The fixture will be mounted about 24 feet above the ground so it has to
be bright.

The people who rate the one below say it's very bright, but have they
ever looked into a 100 watt incandescent floodlight? It's probably
blinding, so I'm not sure the raters' opinions are really comparisons.

The one below at Home Depot from Lithonia Lighting says it has "2
efficient 10-watt LEDs" where the two incandescent lights would
otherwise be. The picture shows two circular devices, each divided
into 3 120-degree parts, with what looks like a small concave reflector
with an LED in the middle of each part. I guess they are saying the 3
together use 10 watts. Are there really 3 1/3 watt LEDs, and is 10
watts from an LED as much light as 100 watts incandescent?? That's what
the floodlights use now, 200 watts total per fixture.

The maker's website
http://www.lithonia.com/commercial/2....VDrPJ 1fDuM0
says "Each head contains (3) 4780K high performance LEDs. Lumen output
of 1,222 is maintained at 50,000 hour life. LED driver is 120V and
operates at 60Hz."

I like the idea of LED, because it's very difficult to change the bulb
on one of my two** double-flloodlights.***, but not if it's not going to
light up the area.

Mostly what I'm looking for is a light that won't go on because of the
wind, but will go on when a person walks by.

This one, despite the high price, $116, only has 6 LEDs (2 by HD's
counting method!).
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Lithonia-...O-BZ/202598344

The same thing with three sets of three LEDs is 150 dollars, implying
that one group of three and the holder is $34
The same thing with photocell but no motion sensor is 98 dollars,
impliying that they're only charging 18 dollars for the motion sensor
and most of the price is for the LEDs.

Thanks.


Details that the electronics guys may find boring. Hey, everyone may
find them boring!
**The other floodlight in the back of the house I put in right under my
bedroom window, so I can just lean out and change the bulb. I wired it
from the receptacle just below the window, so little effort to run the
wires, and it sure looks better than several of my neighbors' who let an
electrician or handyman run surface Romex or conduit from the back porch
light, most of whom no longer have a back porch light.

*** It's chest high when I'm in the attic, so that's about 24 feet (?,
two story house, plus attic. The first floor is about a foot above the
ground.) and I don't have a ladder that long. What I've done to adjust
the light sensor and change the bulb is to unscrew the winged folding
toggle nut inside the attic, remove the big washer, disconnect the Romex
and tie a string to the end of the wire, and lower the whole fixture to
the ground. Do my work there, and pull tthe fixture back up. The hard
parts are getting the romex through its hole, and gettting the long
screw to go though its assigned hole (which is a lot bigger than the
screw, but still not easy to find) so I can screw the toggle nut back
on. I've done this twice with no more than 10 minutes each time trying
to get the screw through, but I fear some time it will take me hours,
and it woudl be nice if it used LED's and never burned out. But at 23
feet high, the light has to be bright!!


**In general terms, halogen flood lights are capable of between 5 ~ 10
Lumens/Watt. Good quality LEDs can manage between 100 ~ 120 Lumens/Watt.
I recently purchased a cheap, Chinese 100 Watt LED + power supply.
Without a reflector, it provides superior lighting to a standard 500
Watt halogen lamp (with reflector).

I took a couple of photos and found that the camera saw things
differently to the human eye. Although the halogen was distinctly yellow
and the LED very white, the amount of illumination was similar.

--
Trevor Wilson www.rageaudio.com.au

nestork October 13th 14 12:06 AM

I have a Pelican flashlight with a single LED light source. That flashlight is brighter than the old equivalent model Pelican Flashlights with the incandescent bulbs.

So, yes, LED's can be brighter than incandescent bulbs.

I expect you'll have no problems with the LED flood light.

Michael Black[_2_] October 13th 14 12:44 AM

Can and LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a realfloodlight?
 
On Sun, 12 Oct 2014, Bob F wrote:

micky wrote:
Can an LED floodlight possibly be as bright as a real floodlight?


The city street lights on my block are now LEDs, and they are plenty bright.



I remember a few years back starting to cross on what I thought was a
green light, except it was red. I was somehow taking in the next corner's
light, that turned green earlier, and it had to be an LED arrangement,
because it was so much brighter than the light closer to me.

Michael



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