Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #21   Report Post  
Old November 14th 12, 03:49 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2011
Posts: 4,724
Default Keeping fat boy from freezing

Maybe that's the secret. I need a fur coat,a nd to blubber more?

(blubbering) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3y6gmt97J4g

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..

"The Daring Dufas" wrote in message
...

Whenever I wonder about how to cope with problems due to very cold
weather, I always look at what the Russians in Siberia do to cope. ^_^

http://rbth.ru/articles/2012/01/04/s...now_14073.html

http://tinyurl.com/c7lebrh

TDD



  #22   Report Post  
Old November 14th 12, 04:58 PM posted to alt.home.repair
EXT EXT is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,664
Default Keeping door latches from freezing


wrote in message
...
Have you ever found some sort of spray or grease that will keep stuff
from freezing? We got rain yesterday, and a deep freeze right
afterwards. Last night both push button door handles on my F-150 truck
were frozen. The push botton door latch on the house storm door and a
slide bolt on my toolshed door was also frozen.

Anyhow, have any of you ever found anything that will keep stuff like
that from freezing? I was wondering about silicone spray? Maybe
vaseline on the slide bolt, but that wont work on the truck? Any other
ideas?

For key holes use a commercial prepared lubricant designed to keep water
out, and make sure the little flap over the key hole is working, it won't
freeze if you keep the water out.

For push buttons, use a white grease around the button and work it in, again
to keep water out so it won't freeze. Freezing rain will still build up over
the button (and the key hole) making it difficult to use, but there is
nothing you can do about it, other than keeping water from entering and
freezing inside the mechanism.


  #23   Report Post  
Old November 15th 12, 06:04 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 6,599
Default Keeping door latches from freezing



HeyBub wrote:
wrote:

What is BIC?


A cigarette lighter

Or ball pen.
  #24   Report Post  
Old November 15th 12, 01:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2011
Posts: 4,724
Default Keeping door latches from freezing

Born In Covenant. (Mormon term.)

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..

"Tony Hwang" wrote in message
...


HeyBub wrote:
wrote:

What is BIC?


A cigarette lighter

Or ball pen.


  #25   Report Post  
Old November 15th 12, 02:12 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 13,015
Default Keeping Siberian homes from freezing

"Stormin Mormon" wrote:
The article says the only way to regulate the indoor temp is by opening
windows. To my way of thinking, if they covered parts of the radiators, it
would reduce the heat input into the room. The heat would go back to the
plant, and reduce the fuel consumption. Uncover as more heat is needed.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.

"The Daring Dufas" wrote in message
...

Whenever I wonder about how to cope with problems due to very cold
weather, I always look at what the Russians in Siberia do to cope. ^_^

http://rbth.ru/articles/2012/01/04/s...now_14073.html

http://tinyurl.com/c7lebrh

TDD


Please explain the physics behind the heat returning to the plant if the
radiator is partially covered.

First tell us what kind of radiators they have and how you would cover them
to accomplish your goal.


  #26   Report Post  
Old November 15th 12, 02:33 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2011
Posts: 4,724
Default Keeping Siberian homes from freezing

Physics: If the circulating water is in insulated tube like the delivery
system, the water retains the heat, rather than radiating it. If the water
is in uninsulated metal such as a radiator, the heat radiates. If the
radiator is insulated, the heat stays in the water, and the returning water
is hotter, and needs less heating.

I've not been to Russia, and don't know the details. The article also didn't
say. I'm guessing it's water circulation. Cast iron radiators. And, to "turn
down the heat" would be to partly cover the radiators with something like
fiberglass insulation, or a blanket.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..

"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...

"Stormin Mormon" wrote:
The article says the only way to regulate the indoor temp is by opening
windows. To my way of thinking, if they covered parts of the radiators, it
would reduce the heat input into the room. The heat would go back to the
plant, and reduce the fuel consumption. Uncover as more heat is needed.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.

http://rbth.ru/articles/2012/01/04/s...now_14073.html

http://tinyurl.com/c7lebrh

TDD


Please explain the physics behind the heat returning to the plant if the
radiator is partially covered.

First tell us what kind of radiators they have and how you would cover them
to accomplish your goal.


  #27   Report Post  
Old November 15th 12, 10:03 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 13,015
Default Keeping Siberian homes from freezing

On Nov 15, 8:38*am, "Stormin Mormon"
wrote:
Physics: If the circulating water is in insulated tube like the delivery
system, the water retains the heat, rather than radiating it. If the water
is in uninsulated metal *such as a radiator, the heat radiates. If the
radiator is insulated, the heat stays in the water, and the returning water
is hotter, and needs less heating.

I've not been to Russia, and don't know the details. The article also didn't
say. I'm guessing it's water circulation. Cast iron radiators. And, to "turn
down the heat" would be to partly cover the radiators with something like
fiberglass insulation, or a blanket.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
*www.lds.org
.

"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

...





"Stormin Mormon" wrote:
The article says the only way to regulate the indoor temp is by opening
windows. To my way of thinking, if they covered parts of the radiators, it
would reduce the heat input into the room. The heat would go back to the
plant, and reduce the fuel consumption. Uncover as more heat is needed.


Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
*www.lds.org
.


http://rbth.ru/articles/2012/01/04/s...now_14073.html


http://tinyurl.com/c7lebrh


TDD


Please explain the physics behind the heat returning to the plant if the
radiator is partially covered.

First tell us what kind of radiators they have and how you would cover them
to accomplish your goal.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


So let's say you and I live in the same building. Just my family and
yours for the sake of the discussion. My radiators are before yours in
the system. I decide to cover 1/2 of my radiators to keep the heat
down.

Wouldn't your apartment be hotter than before I covered my radiators?
Based on your explanation - which I am not necessarily doubting - the
water reaching your radiators would be hotter, therefore your
radiators would radiate more heat, which would mean that you would
have to cover more of your radiators than I did to maintain the same
heat, right?

Then the outside temperature goes down and I want more heat, so I
uncover 1/2 of the 1/2 I had covered. Now the water reaching your
radiators is cooler, so you need more heat for 2 reasons: 1, it's
colder outside and 2, the water reaching your radiator is cooler
because more of the heat is radiating into my apartment. Therefore you
have to uncover more of your radiator.

Now, extrapolate that out to 10 apartments or 50 or more. That seems
like a lot of constant covering and uncovering to maintain a
comfortable temperature in each apartment. Everytime someone makes a
change, the whole building is affected.

I think I'd stick with opening and closing windows which only impact
single apartments, or even single rooms within each apartment.
  #28   Report Post  
Old November 15th 12, 10:11 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2011
Posts: 631
Default Keeping Siberian homes from freezing

On 11/15/2012 2:03 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Nov 15, 8:38 am, "Stormin Mormon"
wrote:
Physics: If the circulating water is in insulated tube like the delivery
system, the water retains the heat, rather than radiating it. If the water
is in uninsulated metal such as a radiator, the heat radiates. If the
radiator is insulated, the heat stays in the water, and the returning water
is hotter, and needs less heating.

I've not been to Russia, and don't know the details. The article also didn't
say. I'm guessing it's water circulation. Cast iron radiators. And, to "turn
down the heat" would be to partly cover the radiators with something like
fiberglass insulation, or a blanket.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.

"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

...





"Stormin Mormon" wrote:
The article says the only way to regulate the indoor temp is by opening
windows. To my way of thinking, if they covered parts of the radiators, it
would reduce the heat input into the room. The heat would go back to the
plant, and reduce the fuel consumption. Uncover as more heat is needed.


Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


http://rbth.ru/articles/2012/01/04/s...now_14073.html


http://tinyurl.com/c7lebrh


TDD


Please explain the physics behind the heat returning to the plant if the
radiator is partially covered.

First tell us what kind of radiators they have and how you would cover them
to accomplish your goal.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


So let's say you and I live in the same building. Just my family and
yours for the sake of the discussion. My radiators are before yours in
the system. I decide to cover 1/2 of my radiators to keep the heat
down.

Wouldn't your apartment be hotter than before I covered my radiators?
Based on your explanation - which I am not necessarily doubting - the
water reaching your radiators would be hotter, therefore your
radiators would radiate more heat, which would mean that you would
have to cover more of your radiators than I did to maintain the same
heat, right?

Then the outside temperature goes down and I want more heat, so I
uncover 1/2 of the 1/2 I had covered. Now the water reaching your
radiators is cooler, so you need more heat for 2 reasons: 1, it's
colder outside and 2, the water reaching your radiator is cooler
because more of the heat is radiating into my apartment. Therefore you
have to uncover more of your radiator.

Now, extrapolate that out to 10 apartments or 50 or more. That seems
like a lot of constant covering and uncovering to maintain a
comfortable temperature in each apartment. Everytime someone makes a
change, the whole building is affected.

I think I'd stick with opening and closing windows which only impact
single apartments, or even single rooms within each apartment.


multiple loops. they're not all on the same loop. your example doesn't
hold up.


  #29   Report Post  
Old November 15th 12, 11:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2011
Posts: 4,724
Default Keeping Siberian homes from freezing

Lets say you're in apartment building with a lot of units. You're in the
first apartment. You want the room colder, so you open the window. The room
now has colder air, so there is greater delta T from the room to the
radiator. The radiator loses heat faster, and cools to a lower temp (lower
room temp) so the next guy gets colder water. And, the water going back to
the heating plant is colder, also. So they use more fuel. See? Opening
windows does at least two bad things. One of which is to cool the water that
the later apartments need.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..

"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...


So let's say you and I live in the same building. Just my family and
yours for the sake of the discussion. My radiators are before yours in
the system. I decide to cover 1/2 of my radiators to keep the heat
down.

Wouldn't your apartment be hotter than before I covered my radiators?
Based on your explanation - which I am not necessarily doubting - the
water reaching your radiators would be hotter, therefore your
radiators would radiate more heat, which would mean that you would
have to cover more of your radiators than I did to maintain the same
heat, right?

Then the outside temperature goes down and I want more heat, so I
uncover 1/2 of the 1/2 I had covered. Now the water reaching your
radiators is cooler, so you need more heat for 2 reasons: 1, it's
colder outside and 2, the water reaching your radiator is cooler
because more of the heat is radiating into my apartment. Therefore you
have to uncover more of your radiator.

Now, extrapolate that out to 10 apartments or 50 or more. That seems
like a lot of constant covering and uncovering to maintain a
comfortable temperature in each apartment. Everytime someone makes a
change, the whole building is affected.

I think I'd stick with opening and closing windows which only impact
single apartments, or even single rooms within each apartment.


  #30   Report Post  
Old November 15th 12, 11:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2011
Posts: 4,724
Default Keeping Siberian homes from freezing

Opening windows requires more fuel at the plant, regardless of the number of
loops.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..

"chaniarts"
wrote in message ...
On 11/15/2012 2:03 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:


I think I'd stick with opening and closing windows which only impact
single apartments, or even single rooms within each apartment.


multiple loops. they're not all on the same loop. your example doesn't
hold up.





Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My door latches all have very sharp edges MM UK diy 11 April 16th 12 10:53 PM
Door latches/locks for unsprung door knobs Michael Kilpatrick UK diy 8 December 22nd 09 12:02 AM
Keeping Washing Machine from Freezing VaTreeFarmer Home Repair 4 September 20th 09 07:18 AM
Keeping things from freezing Richard Evans Woodworking 14 October 5th 08 01:29 AM
Magnetic Door Latches Home Repair 1 March 4th 05 10:39 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:17 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017