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Old January 4th 12, 11:55 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default 3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

You sound like an old man who has gained a lot of wisdom. What kind of oil
do you use? ND30, or what?

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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..

wrote in message
...

As a farmer, I am constantly oiling and greasing stuff. Lots of larger
motors on farm machinery need to be oiled. "Sealed bearings" is just
another way to say "disposible motor". When the bearings seize up,
you toss the motor, spend a couple hundred bucks for a new one and
more if you need an installerm V/S spending 5 minutes and 5 cents
worth of oil every year. I have machinery motors that date back to
the 1950's and 60's that still work fine, but I need to oil then
yearly. But we live in a disposible society and most people would
rather help fill up a garbage dump and spend a large sum of money
every 5 years, than spend any time oiling a motor. For me, when I had
a furnace that needed oil on motors (and most forced air blower
bearings still require oil),, I just did it in fall when I changed the
furnace filter the first time before winter. At the same time I would
oil every other motor, door hinges and whatever needed it in the
house. A half hour of time at most was needed to do all that stuff. A
pump oiler can is always available.






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Old January 4th 12, 11:56 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default 3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

Shoulders, knees, other rotating joints. Silly!

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..

"The Daring Dufas" wrote in message
...

As a farmer, I am constantly oiling and greasing stuff. Lots of larger
motors on farm machinery need to be oiled. "Sealed bearings" is just
another way to say "disposible motor". When the bearings seize up,


Um, where are the grease fittings located on your average cow? ^_^

TDD



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Old January 4th 12, 11:57 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default 3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

Helps em slide from stall to pasture? Makes em moooove easier?

Keep em from watching TV, or they will go liberal, and joine MOOOVE on dot
org. You know how cows love Obamoooooo.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..

"Tony Miklos" wrote in message
...
On 1/4/2012 6:17 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:
house. A half hour of time at most was needed to do all that stuff. A
pump oiler can is always available.


Um, where are the grease fittings located on your average cow? ^_^

TDD


They get "Bag Balm" grease on their teats.


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Old January 5th 12, 12:51 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default 3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

Ed wrote:
With today being very cold and the furnace about to run a lot, I realized that
the electric motor that runs the burner in my oil furnace hadn't been oiled in
a year. I remember in years past having asked the furnace-maintenance guy if
it was okay to use 3-in-1 Multipurpose Household oil in the burner's oil cup.
He'd said it was okay. So that's what I put in, about 8 drops. (The can must
be 10 years old so any volatile ingredients might have evaporated.)

Then I did some online research and have read that is not okay to use that. So
I went to Lowes and got 3-in-1 Motor Oil SAE 20. Can I put that in to flush
out the Household oil with the penetrant that's in the Household oil? Is this
a big problem, or am I worried for nothing?

Is it possible to put too much oil into that hole for the oil cup and cause
damage somehow?


Sae 30 would probably be better. I have been using this oiler for years.
It's got a telescoping tube that you can squirt up, or down, depending on
how you stretch the tube. I should order new stock, and use sae 30 .

http://www.altex.com/GC-Telescoping-...0-P141837.aspx

Greg


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Old January 5th 12, 03:50 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default 3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 17:17:37 -0600, The Daring Dufas
wrote:

On 1/4/2012 12:54 PM, wrote:
On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 05:52:25 -0500, Ed wrote:

On Tue, 03 Jan 2012 23:43:13 -0600,
wrote:

On Tue, 03 Jan 2012 18:07:57 -0500, wrote:


Personally, I think 3-in-1 Multipurpose Household oil is an expensive
way to oil things. Buy a pump oiler can, get a quart of non-detergent
straight weight SAE 20 oil, and use that in the future.


Many years ago, I'd have agreed with you. Seems like everything today
is electronic or has sealed bearings. I cannot think of a single
thing that I've oiled in years. I have a little can of some kind of
multi-purpose oil and I bet it is 30 years old.

I have a spray can of Big 90 that I've had for many years and I've
used it on a hinge or two. Last pump oil can I bought was 45 years
ago and I have no idea where it disappeared to.


As a farmer, I am constantly oiling and greasing stuff. Lots of larger
motors on farm machinery need to be oiled. "Sealed bearings" is just
another way to say "disposible motor". When the bearings seize up,
you toss the motor, spend a couple hundred bucks for a new one and
more if you need an installerm V/S spending 5 minutes and 5 cents
worth of oil every year. I have machinery motors that date back to
the 1950's and 60's that still work fine, but I need to oil then
yearly. But we live in a disposible society and most people would
rather help fill up a garbage dump and spend a large sum of money
every 5 years, than spend any time oiling a motor. For me, when I had
a furnace that needed oil on motors (and most forced air blower
bearings still require oil),, I just did it in fall when I changed the
furnace filter the first time before winter. At the same time I would
oil every other motor, door hinges and whatever needed it in the
house. A half hour of time at most was needed to do all that stuff. A
pump oiler can is always available.


Um, where are the grease fittings located on your average cow? ^_^

TDD

Just below the tail - but the grease comes OUT.
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Old January 5th 12, 03:53 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default 3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

On Wed, 4 Jan 2012 18:55:06 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"
wrote:

You sound like an old man who has gained a lot of wisdom. What kind of oil
do you use? ND30, or what?

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.

wrote in message
.. .

As a farmer, I am constantly oiling and greasing stuff. Lots of larger
motors on farm machinery need to be oiled. "Sealed bearings" is just
another way to say "disposible motor". When the bearings seize up,
you toss the motor, spend a couple hundred bucks for a new one and
more if you need an installerm V/S spending 5 minutes and 5 cents
worth of oil every year. I have machinery motors that date back to
the 1950's and 60's that still work fine, but I need to oil then
yearly. But we live in a disposible society and most people would
rather help fill up a garbage dump and spend a large sum of money
every 5 years, than spend any time oiling a motor. For me, when I had
a furnace that needed oil on motors (and most forced air blower
bearings still require oil),, I just did it in fall when I changed the
furnace filter the first time before winter. At the same time I would
oil every other motor, door hinges and whatever needed it in the
house. A half hour of time at most was needed to do all that stuff. A
pump oiler can is always available.




Non Detergent is really not a "requirement" - don't think a normal
ball or sleeve bearing cares one way or the other.

Same for multigrade - a straight grade oil MAY stand up a bit better -
but I doubt the difference would be noticeable, personally.
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Old January 5th 12, 03:55 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default 3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

On Thu, 5 Jan 2012 00:51:32 +0000 (UTC), gregz
wrote:

Ed wrote:
With today being very cold and the furnace about to run a lot, I realized that
the electric motor that runs the burner in my oil furnace hadn't been oiled in
a year. I remember in years past having asked the furnace-maintenance guy if
it was okay to use 3-in-1 Multipurpose Household oil in the burner's oil cup.
He'd said it was okay. So that's what I put in, about 8 drops. (The can must
be 10 years old so any volatile ingredients might have evaporated.)

Then I did some online research and have read that is not okay to use that. So
I went to Lowes and got 3-in-1 Motor Oil SAE 20. Can I put that in to flush
out the Household oil with the penetrant that's in the Household oil? Is this
a big problem, or am I worried for nothing?

Is it possible to put too much oil into that hole for the oil cup and cause
damage somehow?


Sae 30 would probably be better. I have been using this oiler for years.
It's got a telescoping tube that you can squirt up, or down, depending on
how you stretch the tube. I should order new stock, and use sae 30 .

http://www.altex.com/GC-Telescoping-...0-P141837.aspx

Greg

Personally, I just use the white multi-hydraulic fluid that I also
use in the gearbox of my Myford
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Old January 6th 12, 01:08 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default 3-in-1 oil in an electric motor

On Thu, 5 Jan 2012 09:59:50 -0800, "Steve B" wrote:


wrote

Um, where are the grease fittings located on your average cow? ^_^

TDD

Just below the tail - but the grease comes OUT.


Sounds to me like your dipstick has fallen out of the filler tube, and it's
coming out the overflow.

Steve

You've obviosly never been "greased" by a cow.
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