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Old June 17th 11, 03:04 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

I'm interested in experimenting with trying to revive some old NiCd
batteries by zapping them and I ran across this on YouTube. Good,
clear video about using two other good NiCd batteries to revive the
dead one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e8hHLyXAyQ

R

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Old June 17th 11, 03:58 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

On Jun 17, 10:04*am, RicodJour wrote:
I'm interested in experimenting with trying to revive some old NiCd
batteries by zapping them and I ran across this on YouTube. *Good,
clear video about using two other good NiCd batteries to revive the
dead one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e8hHLyXAyQ

R


I wonder if it works how much more life you get out of them.
I saw this a while back when I had a driver/drill pack that went
bad. Finally decided that for $20 I could get new batteries on
Ebay and just rebuild it.
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Old June 17th 11, 04:35 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

On Jun 17, 9:58*am, "
wrote:
On Jun 17, 10:04*am, RicodJour wrote:

I'm interested in experimenting with trying to revive some old NiCd
batteries by zapping them and I ran across this on YouTube. *Good,
clear video about using two other good NiCd batteries to revive the
dead one.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e8hHLyXAyQ


R


I wonder if it works how much more life you get out of them.
I saw this a while back when I had a driver/drill pack that went
bad. * Finally decided that for $20 I could get new batteries on
Ebay and just rebuild it.


What the OP is talking about is using a low-impedance power source to
burn open the whiskers that sometimes form on older NICAD batteries,
especially when they are left unused and uncharged for long periods of
time. Once the cells start whiskering, they almost always are prone
for it to happen again, the best thing to prevent/stop this is to keep
them permanently on a trickle charger. I have some very old nicads,
perhaps 30+ years old, that I still use in some tools that I keep on
trickle chargers. I know I am using power to keep them charged, but
the convenience of always having the tools ready when I need them
outweighs the small cost. When they were new, they were very
expensive so that is another reason I hate to discard them.
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Old June 17th 11, 07:29 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

On Jun 17, 3:04*pm, RicodJour wrote:
I'm interested in experimenting with trying to revive some old NiCd
batteries by zapping them and I ran across this on YouTube. *Good,
clear video about using two other good NiCd batteries to revive the
dead one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e8hHLyXAyQ

R


A car battery is better. This is a kill or cure solution.
Whiskers of cadmium short out the battery plates.
The massive current blows the whiskers apart.
Good idea to wear gloves and eye protedtion for this trick, the Nicd
can explode
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Old June 18th 11, 01:09 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,864
Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

wrote:
On Jun 17, 11:35 am, "hr(bob) "
wrote:
On Jun 17, 9:58 am, "
wrote:

On Jun 17, 10:04 am, RicodJour wrote:


I'm interested in experimenting with trying to revive some old NiCd
batteries by zapping them and I ran across this on YouTube. Good,
clear video about using two other good NiCd batteries to revive the
dead one.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e8hHLyXAyQ

R


I wonder if it works how much more life you get out of them.
I saw this a while back when I had a driver/drill pack that went
bad. Finally decided that for $20 I could get new batteries on
Ebay and just rebuild it.


What the OP is talking about is using a low-impedance power source to
burn open the whiskers that sometimes form on older NICAD batteries,
especially when they are left unused and uncharged for long periods
of time. Once the cells start whiskering, they almost always are
prone for it to happen again, the best thing to prevent/stop this is
to keep them permanently on a trickle charger. I have some very old
nicads, perhaps 30+ years old, that I still use in some tools that I
keep on trickle chargers. I know I am using power to keep them
charged, but the convenience of always having the tools ready when I
need them outweighs the small cost. When they were new, they were
very expensive so that is another reason I hate to discard them.


Actually I've read just the opposite. That leaving them completely
discharged is the best way to store them.


I wouldn't believe that for a moment.




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Old June 18th 11, 02:13 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 13:30:24 -0700 (PDT), bob haller
wrote:


I have also heard of people doing the same thing with a car battery
but the down side of that is that the battery pack can blow up if
there are to many internal shorts.


car batteries plates are consumed and fall apart after awhile, you
might get a shorted cell once in a great while but the vast majority
of car batteries plates just disengrate

I THINK he meant using a car battery to ZAP the NiCad.
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Old June 18th 11, 02:27 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 17:09:12 -0700, "Bob F"
wrote:

wrote:
On Jun 17, 11:35 am, "hr(bob) "
wrote:
On Jun 17, 9:58 am, "
wrote:

On Jun 17, 10:04 am, RicodJour wrote:

I'm interested in experimenting with trying to revive some old NiCd
batteries by zapping them and I ran across this on YouTube. Good,
clear video about using two other good NiCd batteries to revive the
dead one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e8hHLyXAyQ

R

I wonder if it works how much more life you get out of them.
I saw this a while back when I had a driver/drill pack that went
bad. Finally decided that for $20 I could get new batteries on
Ebay and just rebuild it.

What the OP is talking about is using a low-impedance power source to
burn open the whiskers that sometimes form on older NICAD batteries,
especially when they are left unused and uncharged for long periods
of time. Once the cells start whiskering, they almost always are
prone for it to happen again, the best thing to prevent/stop this is
to keep them permanently on a trickle charger. I have some very old
nicads, perhaps 30+ years old, that I still use in some tools that I
keep on trickle chargers. I know I am using power to keep them
charged, but the convenience of always having the tools ready when I
need them outweighs the small cost. When they were new, they were
very expensive so that is another reason I hate to discard them.


Actually I've read just the opposite. That leaving them completely
discharged is the best way to store them.


I wouldn't believe that for a moment.

According to Panasonic, storing NiCads should be between 10 and 30
degrees F, and charged at least once a year. Never store the battery
dead.
NiMh batteries are a different story and can be stored long-term
either dead or fully charged, According to both Sony and Duracell you
may need to "reactivate" them by charge cycling - long term storage
between -20 and +35 F, 50% RH.

DO NOT store dead with a load connected.
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Old June 18th 11, 11:22 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 6,405
Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

On Jun 17, 9:27*pm, wrote:
On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 17:09:12 -0700, "Bob F"
wrote:





wrote:
On Jun 17, 11:35 am, "hr(bob) "
wrote:
On Jun 17, 9:58 am, "
wrote:


On Jun 17, 10:04 am, RicodJour wrote:


I'm interested in experimenting with trying to revive some old NiCd
batteries by zapping them and I ran across this on YouTube. Good,
clear video about using two other good NiCd batteries to revive the
dead one.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e8hHLyXAyQ


R


I wonder if it works how much more life you get out of them.
I saw this a while back when I had a driver/drill pack that went
bad. Finally decided that for $20 I could get new batteries on
Ebay and just rebuild it.


What the OP is talking about is using a low-impedance power source to
burn open the whiskers that sometimes form on older NICAD batteries,
especially when they are left unused and uncharged for long periods
of time. Once the cells start whiskering, they almost always are
prone for it to happen again, the best thing to prevent/stop this is
to keep them permanently on a trickle charger. I have some very old
nicads, perhaps 30+ years old, that I still use in some tools that I
keep on trickle chargers. I know I am using power to keep them
charged, but the convenience of always having the tools ready when I
need them outweighs the small cost. When they were new, they were
very expensive so that is another reason I hate to discard them.


Actually I've read just the opposite. *That leaving them completely
discharged is the best way to store them.


I wouldn't believe that for a moment.


According to Panasonic, storing NiCads should be between 10 and 30
degrees F, and charged at least once a year. Never store the battery
dead.
NiMh batteries are a different story and can be stored long-term
either dead or fully charged, According to both Sony and Duracell you
may need to "reactivate" them by charge cycling - long term storage
between -20 and +35 F, 50% RH.

DO NOT store dead with a load connected.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


And here's some sources that say they should be stored
discharged:

http://www.batterystuff.com/tutorial-NiCad.html

" When preparing to store NiCad batteries, be sure to discharge the
batteries fairly deeply. The range in recommendations is between 40%
and 0% charged when going into storage. "

http://www.saftbatteries.com/SAFT/Up...ft/PDF/tn1.pdf

http://users.frii.com/dlc/battery.htm

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Old June 18th 11, 02:33 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3,240
Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

On Jun 18, 5:22*am, "
wrote:
On Jun 17, 9:27*pm, wrote:





On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 17:09:12 -0700, "Bob F"
wrote:


wrote:
On Jun 17, 11:35 am, "hr(bob) "
wrote:
On Jun 17, 9:58 am, "
wrote:


On Jun 17, 10:04 am, RicodJour wrote:


I'm interested in experimenting with trying to revive some old NiCd
batteries by zapping them and I ran across this on YouTube. Good,
clear video about using two other good NiCd batteries to revive the
dead one.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e8hHLyXAyQ


R


I wonder if it works how much more life you get out of them.
I saw this a while back when I had a driver/drill pack that went
bad. Finally decided that for $20 I could get new batteries on
Ebay and just rebuild it.


What the OP is talking about is using a low-impedance power source to
burn open the whiskers that sometimes form on older NICAD batteries,
especially when they are left unused and uncharged for long periods
of time. Once the cells start whiskering, they almost always are
prone for it to happen again, the best thing to prevent/stop this is
to keep them permanently on a trickle charger. I have some very old
nicads, perhaps 30+ years old, that I still use in some tools that I
keep on trickle chargers. I know I am using power to keep them
charged, but the convenience of always having the tools ready when I
need them outweighs the small cost. When they were new, they were
very expensive so that is another reason I hate to discard them.


Actually I've read just the opposite. *That leaving them completely
discharged is the best way to store them.


I wouldn't believe that for a moment.


According to Panasonic, storing NiCads should be between 10 and 30
degrees F, and charged at least once a year. Never store the battery
dead.
NiMh batteries are a different story and can be stored long-term
either dead or fully charged, According to both Sony and Duracell you
may need to "reactivate" them by charge cycling - long term storage
between -20 and +35 F, 50% RH.


DO NOT store dead with a load connected.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


And here's some sources that say they should be stored
discharged:

http://www.batterystuff.com/tutorial-NiCad.html

" When preparing to store NiCad batteries, be sure to discharge the
batteries fairly deeply. The range in recommendations is between 40%
and 0% charged when going into storage. "

http://www.saftbatteries.com/SAFT/Up...ft/PDF/tn1.pdf

http://users.frii.com/dlc/battery.htm- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I would trust Panasonic more than some web site
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Old June 18th 11, 07:35 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 3,643
Default Reviving old NiCd batteries

On Jun 18, 11:56*am, wrote:
On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 13:30:24 -0700 (PDT), bob haller
wrote:



I have also heard of people doing the same thing with a car battery
but the down side of that is that the battery pack can blow up if
there are to many internal shorts.


car batteries plates are consumed and fall apart after awhile, you
might get a shorted cell once in a great while but the vast majority
of car batteries plates just disengrate


I was talking about using the car battery to fix the nicad


Sorry i miss toook what you said

But nicad cell wear out too, one failure must be shorted cell, but
nothing lasts forever

A local tool store had a big business going for awhile, apparently
zapping battery packs. Ther business ended as people lined up for
refunds....


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